Fifty Easy Old-Fashioned Roses, Climbers and Vines

Fifty Easy Old-Fashioned Roses, Climbers and Vines

by Anne M. Zeman

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ISBN-13: 9781466884175
Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date: 10/28/2014
Sold by: Macmillan
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 108
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About the Author

Anne M. Zeman is the author of Fifty Easy Old-Fashioned Roses, Climbers and Vines


Anne M. Zeman is the author of Fifty Easy Old-Fashioned Roses, Climbers and Vines.

Read an Excerpt

Fifty Easy Old-Fashioned Roses, Climbers, and Vines


By Anne M. Zeman

Henry Holt and Company

Copyright © 1995 Irving Place, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4668-8417-5



CHAPTER 1

'Alfred de Dalmas'

Type: Moss

Parentage: Unknown

Introduced: 1855 by Portemer, France


HISTORY

The name 'Alfred de Dalmas' is used interchangeably with 'Mousseline' to describe this Moss rose. In the United States, 'Alfred de Dalmas' is the name more commonly used. Generally thought to be related to 'Autumn Damask' or 'Quartre Saisons Blanc,' 'Alfred de Dalmas,' like all Moss roses, is a Centifolia that has growth on its sepals that resembles moss. Bred between 1850 and 1870, Moss roses were quite popular with the Victorians.


DESCRIPTION

'Alfred de Dalmas' is the best repeat flowering Moss rose. Medium-size flowers are 2 1/2 to 3 inches across, in a pale blush pink, which fades to white. The delicately-scented blooms are cup-shaped, with high centers, and semi-double in form with 55 to 65 petals. Borne in tight clusters, the blooms of 'Alfred de Dalmas' are quite free-flowering. The moss is greenish-brown, turning to red-brown on older stems. Growth is compact and bushy, reaching 3 to 4 feet high, spreading about 2 to 3 feet. Foliage is pale green-gray with round, spoon-shaped leaves. The canes are rough, but have few thorns. 'Alfred de Dalmas' is tolerant of poor soils, disease resistant, and winter hardy.

Bloom time: Mid June with good repeat bloom in the fall. Often blooms continuously from June through October.

Uses: Because of the compactness of the bush, 'Alfred de Dalmas' is perfect for smaller gardens. It makes an exceptional low hedge and a charming specimen plant in rose gardens or in containers.

Position: Sun or part shade.

Zones: 4 to 9.

CHAPTER 2

'Baronne Prévost'

Type: Hybrid Perpetual

Parentage: Unknown

Introduced: 1842 by Desprez, France


HISTORY

Raised by Desprez of Yébles, France, 'Barron Prévost' is named for the sister of Desprez's friend, Guenoux, a breeder of dahlias. Desprez sold for a hundred francs the ownership of this rose Cochet, who marketed the rose in 1842.

'Baronne Prévost' is an early representative of the first state of development of the Hybrid Perpetual class. Hybrid Perpetuals emerged in the 1830s, a complex product of marrying Chinas, Portlands, Bourbons, and Noisettes. At first Hybrid Perpetuals competed with the Bourbons, but soon became very popular as an exhibition rose.


DESCRIPTION

Known for its beauty, hardiness, and general versatility, 'Baronne Prévost' has been available in America since 1848. Thick clusters of globular buds open flat and quartered, with as many as 100 petals, in a deep rose pink. A small button eye dots the center. The large, very fragrant blooms are 3 1/2 to 4 inches across. Free-flowering, 'Baronne Prévost,' provides a mass of color.

Vigorous and erect, with growth up to 5 feet tall and about 4 feet wide, these bushy plants have dark green, somewhat coarse leaves, and thick, thorny canes.

Fertilize generously for an abundance of blooms. During dormancy, prune down approximately one half their height to keep plants compact and to ensure continuous blooms. Tolerant of poor soils, disease resistant, and winter hardy, 'Baronne Prévost' can be spotted growing wild in the countryside.

Bloom time: Mid to late June with good repeat through summer and early fall.

Uses: Beautiful in an informal border or good as a specimen plant near a house or along pathways. Suitable for hedging.

Position: Sun.

Zones: 4 to 9.

CHAPTER 3

'Baroness Rothschild'

Type: Hybrid Perpetual

Parentage: Sport (mutation or genetically altered branch) of 'Souvenir de la Reine d'Angleterre'

Introduced: 1868 by Pére, France


HISTORY

Originally discovered by Pernet Pére, this rose is also known as 'Baronne Adolphe de Rothschild' or 'Mme. La Baronne de Rothschild.'

Hybrid Perpetuals, a group of roses that originated in the 1830s, were the forerunners of the Hybrid Teas. The first to flower perpetually, or recurrently, Hybrid Perpetuals are the result of a union of many roses. The old-fashioned 'Baroness Rothschild' is also thought to be closely related to the Portland rose, a rose type that originated in the late 1800s from a cross between a Damask and a Gallica.


DESCRIPTION

'Baroness Rothschild' produces some of the most beautiful flowers of the old roses. The perfectly formed, large, double flowers are a soft, clear pink. The cup-shaped blooms, 51/2 to 6 inches wide, are dense with pink petals on the outside, growing deeper pink towards the center. One of the largest blooms of old roses, the larger outer petals surround many tightly packed, shorter central petals. Lightly fragrant, the flowers generally appear singly, but very free-flowering, on erect stems. 'Baroness Rothschild' grows 4 to 6 feet tall and spreads about 3 to 4 feet. The bush is thick with medium gray-green, semiglossy leaves with large leaflets. The canes are smooth with few thorns. 'Baroness Rothschild' is disease resistant, tolerant of poor soils, and winter hardy.

Bloom time: Mid to late June with fair repeat in fall.

USES: Because the flowers appear singly and are held on erect, strong stems, 'Baroness Rothschild' makes an excellent rose for cutting. It also does very well in containers and is fine for hedges, bedding, or massed in groups.

Position: Sun.

Zones: 4 to 9.

CHAPTER 4

'Belle de Créy'

Type: Gallica

Parentage: Unknown

Introduced: 1848 by Roeser, France


HISTORY

Grown before 1848 — some rose historians have placed this rose between 1830 and 1836 — the 'Belle de Crécy' was grown and introduced to the market by the Frenchman Roeser of Crécy en Brie. It's not clear whether the rose is named for Madame de Pompadour, who is said to have favored it in her garden at Crécy, or if the rose is simply named for Roeser's hometown.


DESCRIPTION

Among the many rosy-mauve and purple Gallicas available, 'Belle de Crécy' is one of the most reliable and free-flowering. The flowers go through a succession of shades of violets, purples, mauves, and pinks. Buds are pink and open into a deep pinkish-purple, maturing to violet-mauve, eventually turning to lavender-gray. Blooms open wide, flat, and quartered, with reflexing (curved back) petals around a green button eye. The 2 1/2 to 3-inch wide flowers may have as many as 200 petals. This exquisitely fragrant rose blooms for about three weeks in mid-summer. Reaching about 4 feet tall with a 3-foot spread, the plant's growth is rounded and compact. Foliage is medium to dark green with dull, rough leaves. The canes are nearly thornless. 'Belle de Crécy' is tolerant of poor soils, disease resistant, and winter hardy, although it is somewhat susceptible to mildew in wet weather.

Bloom time: Mid-June with no repeat.

Uses: In formal and informal rose collections, 'Belle de Crécy' contrasts nicely with white roses. Its compact size also makes it a fine rose for containers and suitable for low hedges.

Position: Sun.

Zones: 4 to 9.

CHAPTER 5

'Blanc Double de Coubert'

Type: Rugosa

Parentage: R. rugosa x 'Sombreuil'

Introduced: 1892 by Cochet-Cochet, France


HISTORY

Pierre Cochet and his two sons Philémon and Scipion, were rosarians from Suisnes, France, who bred and introduced many roses in the 1800s.

Rugosa roses are native to China, Japan, and Korea. They have two unique qualities: they are very hardy and they are almost alone among wild roses that repeat bloom. Crossing a Rugosa rose with the beautiful Tea rose 'Sombreuil' resulted in this new rose with the loveliest qualities of its parent plants.


DESCRIPTION

One of the most beautiful of white roses, 'Blanc Double de Coubert' also has the most intoxicating of fragrances. The large, snowy-white flowers are perfectly formed, 3 to 4 inches across, with loosely arranged petals around a yellow center. Buds appear with a hint of blush color, open in a semi-double form, and flower with remarkable consistency. Foliage is rich green and bushy, with leathery leaves that turn bright yellow in the fall. Shrubs are moderately vigorous, growing 4 to 6 feet tall, with a spread of about 4 to 5 feet. Bright orange-scarlet hips appear after flowering.

Deadheading will encourage more blooms. To groom and keep hips, cut only the spent petals. Prune only for thinning and to remove old, dead wood, or to shape.

One of the best performing Rugosas, 'Blanc Double de Coubert' is extremely resistant to disease, tolerant of poor soils and shade, and extremely hardy.

Bloom time: Early to mid June with good repeat bloom throughout summer.

Uses: Excellent in an informal bed or as a hedge, 'Blanc Double de Coubert' has a delicious fragrance, making it desirable near pathways or sitting areas. Because of its vigor, it makes a valuable plant for stabilizing steep banks or a fine planting at the seashore.

Position: Sun or part shade.

Zones: 3 to 8, occasionally 2.

CHAPTER 6

'Charles de Mills'

Type: Gallica

Parentage: Unknown

Introduced: 19th Century


HISTORY

Neither the parentage nor the origination date of the 'Charles de Mills' rose is known. One old rose source suggests that the breeder was Desportes, a Frenchman active between 1800 and 1835 and author of Rosetum Gallicum, published in 1828. Despite its misty origins, 'Charles de Mills' is one of the few old roses listed in the top ten most popular U. S. roses at the 1991 World Federation of Roses.


DESCRIPTION

'Charles de Mills' is a spectacular, dark magenta rose known to bloom in shades from crimson to purple and violet. Flowers are extra large, up to 4 1/2 inches across, fully double, and well quartered with about 200 petals. Blooms first open a rich rosy-purple but gradually darken in a succession of crimson tones. The flower is a unique shape, its extremely full petals forming a flat cup, as if the petals have been sheared across the top in an elegant, even way. When fully open, the bloom shows a green cavity rather than a button eye at its center. This moderately perfumed rose is immensely free-flowering, smothering the bush in blooms for as many as six weeks. Growth is upright and vigorous, reaching 41/2 to 5 feet tall, with very dark, rough, green leaves. Canes are moderately bristly with sparse thorns. Disease resistant and winder hardy, tolerant of poor soils — but especially productive in rich soil — 'Charles de Mills' is one of the finest performers among the old roses.

Bloom time: Mid to late June, no repeat bloom.

Uses: Good in general garden purposes, but deserving of a prominent position in a rose garden. 'Charles de Mills' spreads considerably, making a good hedge. It also makes a wonderful boutonniere. Plants are easy to root from cuttings.

Position: Sun.

Zones: 4 to 9.

CHAPTER 7

'Fatin–Latour'

Type: Centifolia

Parentage: Unknown

Introduced: 19th century


HISTORY

Nothing is known of the date or the origin of 'Fatin-Latour.' Found in an old English garden sometime in the mid to late 1800s, the owner had labeled the rose the "Best Garden Rose." Classified as a Centifolia because its bloom and habit are characteristic of the type, it also has some China rose qualities. It was named for the great French painter, Henri Fantin-Latour, whose finest paintings always included the old roses, many of which may be the rose named for him.


DESCRIPTION

Aglorious Centifolia, 'Fatin-Latour' makes a beautiful garden shrub. Dark rosy-pink buds open to a delicate, pale blush-pink color, each one about 3 1/2 inches wide. Forming a circular cup shape, the petals are a slightly darker pink in the center, later opening flat and growing paler. The fully double, sometimes quartered flowers have outer petals that reflex (curve back) with maturity to expose a small button center. Blossoms have a light, sweet fragrance. The multitude of flowers bloom in clusters of 2 to 5, which stay open a long time. Very free-flowering, 'Fatin-Latour' makes a large, rounded bush, 5 feet tall with a 4-foot spread. The dark green, rounded leaves have 3 to 5 large leaflets and canes with few thorns. 'Fatin-Latour' will tolerate poor soils.

Bloom time: Mid to late June, no repeat bloom.

Uses: Makes a beautiful cut flower, or grow it in small groups or in a shrub border. 'Fatin-Latour' is suitable for informal or woodland plantings and makes a fine hedge.

Position: Sun.

Zones: 4 to 9.

CHAPTER 8

'Félicité Parmentier'

Type: Alba

Parentage: Unknown

Introduced: Before 1828


HISTORY

Known since classical times, Alba roses were widely grown during the Middle Ages and appear in many paintings of that period. They are thought to be the result of natural hybridization between the Dog rose (Rosa canina) and either the Damask rose or Rosa gallica.

Parentage of 'Félicité Parmentier' is unknown but R. damascena may possibly be related. Both of these roses are characterized by openness of their branches.


DESCRIPTION

'Félicité Parmentier' is a stunning rose that develops rounded, creamy-yellow buds in late spring and early summer before opening to soft pink. Blooms consist of a multitude of petals formed into a tightly-packed cluster, wonderfully-scented and perfectly quartered. They open fully to form a small, round shape about 21/2 to 3 inches across. Flowers later reflex (curve backward) and fade to cream at the edges. Blooms open somewhat slowly and last long on the stems. Growth is bushy but compact, only 4 feet high by 3 feet wide, with light green leaves and contrasting dark thorns. Minimum pruning is necessary, but wait until second or third year because best blooms grow on second-year wood. Occasional hard pruning will encourage more blooms. 'Félicité Parmentier' is tolerant of poor soils, but in dry seasons in sandy soil, the flowers sometimes fail to open properly.

Bloom time: Mid to late June with fair repeat bloom.

Uses: An extremely fragrant rose, it is excellent for cutting, lasting a long time in water. Its small and compact size makes it a good choice for small gardens. It is also suitable for woodland or country settings and makes a fine small hedge.

Position: Sun or part shade.

Zones: 3 to 9.

CHAPTER 9

'Frau Karl Druschki'

Type: Hybrid Perpetual

Parentage: 'Merveille de Lyon' x 'Mme. Caroline Testout'

Introduced: 1901 by Lambert, Germany


HISTORY

The 'Frau Karl Druschki' rose was raised by Peter Lambert who, in 1900, entered it in the German National Rose Society's competition for the best new German rose. The winner was to be named 'Otto von Bismarck.' Because its pure white petals were deemed unsuitable to represent the Iron Chancellor, Lambert's rose won second place and so he named the rose instead for the wife of the president of the Rose Society. Enthusiastically received, 'White American Beauty' (the name given to the rose in America) was described as the "most popular rose in America" in a 1920s rose catalog.


DESCRIPTION

This beautiful, pure white rose was called 'Snow Queen' in England and 'White American Beauty' in the United States; nurserymen thought 'Frau Karl Druschki' was difficult to remember and, during World War I, feared the rose by its other name would fall victim to anti-German sentiment. The large, double flowers, 4 to 41/2 inches wide, bloom abundantly in large clusters. The thick, rose-pink buds are pointed, and open to pure white flowers with high centers, like Hybrid Teas. When fully extended, the petals form a cup shape. This rose has little or no fragrance. A vigorous shrub, it can reach 5 to 7 feet tall, more if trained as a climber. Its habit is upright and thick with soft, medium green leaves; the nearly smooth canes have few thorns. To keep the plant in a woody bush form, prune it back hard each year, as you would a Hybrid Tea. Although not generally thought of as a climber, its vigorous and arching canes make it an excellent rose for pillars and fences. To encourage climbing, prune minimally, opening the center and training the canes laterally to induce growth to 8 to 12 feet. Remove old wood annually in late winter or early spring. Although disease resistant, it can be somewhat susceptible to black spot. It is one of the most weather-resistant white roses and is winter hardy.

Bloom time: Mid to late June with good repeat throughout the summer and into the fall.

Uses: Plant several bushes together to best effect. Makes an excellent thick hedge. Arching canes make it ideal for the back of the border or for use as a climber.

Position: Sun.

Zones: 4 to 9.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Fifty Easy Old-Fashioned Roses, Climbers, and Vines by Anne M. Zeman. Copyright © 1995 Irving Place, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Henry Holt and Company.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

Title Page,
Copyright Notice,
Dedication,
Acknowledgments,
Introduction,
Roses,
'Alfred de Dalmas',
'Baronne Prévost',
'Baroness Rothschild',
'Belle de Crécy',
'Blanc Double de Coubert',
'Charles de Mills',
'Fatin-Latour',
'Félicité Parmentier',
'Frau Karl Druschki',
'Harison's Yellow',
'Jacques Cartier',
'Katharina Zeimet',
'Königen von Dänemark',
'La Reine Victoria',
'Louise Odier',
'Madame Hardy',
'Madame Isaac Pereire',
'Old Blush',
'Paul Neyron',
'Reine des Violettes',
Rosa x centifolia,
'Rosa Mundi',
'Rose du Roi',
'Safrano',
'Salet',
'Sir Thomas Lipton',
'Souvenir de la Malmaison',
'Stanwell Perpetual',
Climbers,
'American Pillar',
'Cécile Brunner,' Climbing,
'Dorothy Perkins',
'Gloire de Dijon',
'Madame Alfred Carriere',
'Paul Ricaut',
'Sombreuil,' Climbing,
'Zéphirine Drouhin',
Vines,
Black-Eyed Susan Vine,
Canary Bird Vine,
Clematis,
Crossvine,
Dutchman's Pipe,
Honeysuckle,
Hydrangea, Climbing,
Ipomoea,
Morning Glory Vine,
Moonflower,
Cardinal Climber,
Cypress Vine,
Passion Flower,
Trumpet Creeper,
Wisteria,
About the Author,
Indexes,
Copyright,

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