Finnikin of the Rock (Lumatere Chronicles Series)

Finnikin of the Rock (Lumatere Chronicles Series)

by Melina Marchetta

Hardcover(Library Binding - Reprint)

$19.62 $21.80 Save 10% Current price is $19.62, Original price is $21.8. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Use Standard Shipping. For guaranteed delivery by December 24, use Express or Expedited Shipping.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781613831465
Publisher: Perfection Learning Corporation
Publication date: 08/28/2011
Series: Lumatere Chronicles Series
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 399
Sales rank: 989,063
Product dimensions: 5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.40(d)
Age Range: 14 - 17 Years

About the Author

Melina Marchetta is the acclaimed and award-winning author of JELLICOE ROAD, the Michael L. Printz Award winner, SAVING FRANCESCA, and LOOKING FOR ALIBRANDI. She lives in Australia, where FINNIKIN OF THE ROCK, her first fantasy novel, won an Aurealis Award.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Finnikin of the Rock 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 111 reviews.
stellernightair More than 1 year ago
Although not in her usual genre, Finnickin of the Rock is a hauntingly beautiful and artfully crafted work of fantasy. Marchetta's poetic style will break your heart and then carefully patch it back together ten times better than it was before. In an interview Marchetta stated that she wanted to write about a group of people struggling with a loss of cultural identity; to represent tragic real situations subtly occurring in our own world. We enter the story naiive and with a certain innocence, but the story leaves us with a profound sense of self awareness and compels one to question his/her own identity. There is something so sad about this story and yet through it all we never lose hope. Hope that the world will be better, that the situation will change, that the characters within it will find peace. And that is what makes this epic so damn good!
yearningtoread More than 1 year ago
Finnikin of the Rock has been traveling with his mentor, Sir Topher, for nearly ten years. Finnikin's father and mother died, along with most of the Lumeratens during the five days of unspeakable, when the Lumeraten country was taken over by an imposter king. Finnikin and Sir Topher believe the heir to the throne, Balthazaar, is dead until Finnikin is visited in his dreams by a goddess, who calls Finnikin to find her. The goddess gives Finnikin the novice Evanjalin, a silent girl with a bald head who claims that the heir of Lumatere is alive - and that she can take them to him. Loyal to his country but annoyed by this strange girl who won't speak to him, Finnikin and Sir Topher set off on a journey to find the heir and bring their country back together. I don't really know how I feel about this book. For certain aspects, I love it. For others...not so much. It was strange, but when I put it down, I felt that it could have been epic, but part of its epicness was overshadowed. By what? Well, I'll start with the bad, and end with the good. Bad: For one, there were several sexual implications or references. Some were obvious; some had hidden meanings. They were scattered all throughout the book. On top of that, I felt a bit lost, especially toward the beginning. While the book was written excellently, at times I felt there was too much information, and at others I felt there was too little. I found myself skimming over certain parts with little interest and then would read the scenes that had huge impact on the story, or I found interesting. On the other hand, we have the good of this story: Melina Marchetta definitely has a talent when it comes to forming her sentences, and her characters. The characters had strong quirks or "handles" that made them singular. But the one thing about this book that struck me most was the culture, the desperateness of a people ruined and lost. The countries and peoples were fell formed and described. I was deeply moved by the plight of the Lumeratens, the scenes of Finnikin carrying a dead baby to its dead mother, of men and women fighting for all that they have lived for - all that their fathers, brothers, mothers, and sisters have died for. It was these things, as well as the powerful love story, that gave the book a mood and a feel to it that most books long for. So whether or not you want to read it is your choice. While I can't really point you in either direction, I wish I could. And I hope there's a sequel that will be exactly what this one could have been - epic.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Finnikin has had the world on his shoulders since the age of nine. Although not yet men, Prince Balthazar, Lucien, and he promised to protect the royal family for the rest of their lives. The boys are unaware that in a short time their world will be torn apart; the royal family murdered, and their country in despair. In ten years time, Finnikin and Evanjalin, a novice of a Goddess, work towards ending the terrible rule over the people of Lumatere. FINNIKIN OF THE ROCK is spoken through the hand of a true fantasy writer, Melina Marchetta. Validly, a world is created all on its own full of mystery, adventure, and both romantic and horrifying surprises. From beginning to end, every character is cherished and their flaws and strengths are examined openly - especially in the prolonged development of the relationship between Finnikin and Evanjalin, when each reveal they want something more than companionship but believe the fate of the world is more important than happiness.
monsterofbooks More than 1 year ago
You know when you see something truly breathtaking and your in awe over how beautiful it is, well I think that is the right thing to say about Finnikin of the Rock. It is everything that makes a story perfect, but the book talks about a dystopian world. Melina Marchetta creates a story that has hauntingly real imagery, with words that flow nicely like a calm lake. She gives enough description to easily understand the situation and the word, and won't have readers falling asleep. The maps in the book are easy to follow, and I found myself looking at it quite a few times. The world is well built and it's easy to picture, it is also unique in the fact that you can see the cultural difference between each land as the characters travel through it. The emotion is strong and well put and will have readers at lost for words. The readers can really feel sad, angry and horrified as they read about the exile and fever camps, and hear of the five days of the unspeakable. But you will also feel hope that maybe, by the end of the book the people will regain hold of Lumatere. The characters are developed nicely, in a way that will have you make a soft spot for each one of them in your heart. Evanjalin and Froi were probably my favorite two characters. Evanjalin was such a strong, passionate and hopeful women/girl in the story. Anybody would envy that, and I certainly was proud to read about a strong women lead. Froi was someone who you hate at first, but then after hearing his POV you really feel for him. He's just a mischievous s little boy who envies people around him and wants to belong. Something that anyone can relate to. A lot of the situations were truthful, and how they were dealt with was faithful to how I can imagine them being laid out. Example of this is Trevanion's & Lady Beatriss relationship. The story's narration, which was from different characters POV, was amazingly well crafted. The romance in the story (between Evanjalin & Finnikin) was really well developed. Probably the first real romance that I truly enjoyed the development of. It wasn't to slow and it wasn't to fast, it was just right. It felt honest and good. Some of the plot twists were a bit obvious. What I would of liked to seen developed more was more knowledge of the impostor king. Who was he? I also think the battle to regain Lumatere should of been more descriptive and longer. It was a bit short, and was sort of a downer as it was what the whole book was leading up to. Usually I don't read fantasy, I find it to confusing. I enjoyed Eragon but found it confusing. It might of been because I was young when I read it. But this novel wasn't confusing and probably the first fantasy I actually really enjoyed. I really hope there is a sequel, though this book does work as a stand-alone to. So when I was reading the author's bio, I was very surprised to find that this was her first fantasy: "I was told often that I couldn't write fantasy unless I had read all the greats and knew the conventions well, but I think the first step to writing good fantasy is knowing this world we live in well. I wanted to look closely at that---where loss of faith, loss of homeland and identity, displacement of spirit, and breakdown of community are common--- because these are the scenes in today's media that affect me most. In this sense, the book is a search for identity in the same way that my other novels are." -Melina Marchetta. You wouldn't think after reading this book,
Miss-K More than 1 year ago
This is a great, easy read for those who love fantasy/adventure stories with some romance
ShellyPYA on LibraryThing 20 days ago
Finnikin was 9 when the royal family was slaughtered and an imposter king took the throne. After wandering the land for ten years recording the names of the exiles, he meets Evanjalin, a novice who claims that Balthazar, the true heir to the throne, is still alive. His travels with her to find him reveal that she has many secrets about her identity, his destiny, and the kingdom of Lumatere.
cay250 on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Cursed by a dying wise woman, the land of Lumatere waits for its lost heir to open the walled gates and free the population from a depraved and predatory dictator who killed their royal family. Finnikin of the Rock, his mentor Sir Topher and the mysterious novice Evanjalin trek through a variety of kingdoms freeing exiled leaders and rebuilding an army. Although it¿s a long story, fantasy readers will enjoy the complex plot, filled with political intrigue, frequent red herrings and close escapes from various dangers. Fans of Graceling with like this series.
mjsnooks on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Probably my favourite book ever. This is one of the very few books I have reread again straight after finishing because it moved me so much. Whilst Fantasy, this novel is firmly based on both the evils and beauty of human nature.
ewyatt on LibraryThing 22 days ago
FInnikin is a statesman, ambassador, warrior, and leader of his people - only he doesn't realize this yet. He gets a mystical message from the goddess which starts him on a quest where he meets Evanjalin and a slave named Froi. Together this group tries to reunite their people who are in exile and reclaim their homeland which has been closed to them by a curse after the king was murdered and the throne usurped. A little slow going at the outset, but that might be a function of being introduced to this world. The characters are strong and vibrant. The suffering of the people is painful. And Finnikin is a stubborn, brave, loyal, and romantic future King.
ericajsc on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Everyone who enjoys reading should read this book. Seriously. Even if you¿re shying away from it because it¿s fantasy and you¿re not into fantasy, it doesn¿t matter. Yes, it has all the elements of fantasy that might be off-putting: a fictional land with strange-sounding kingdoms and tales of war and goddesses and prophesies. But within that frame, Marchetta tells a beautiful story about a boy, his journey to his people, and the renewed hope of a people who endured hardships that are the makings of nightmares.The book begins with a prologue that recounts the pledge Finnikin made with Balthazar and Lucian and the events that came swiftly after. The story is a little confusing at first, with talk that Evangeline has a mysterious gift and is believed to have a strange connection to the rightful heir to the Lumateran throne. But it didn¿t take long for me to become fully immersed in the story. Finnikin¿s crew takes a circuitous journey across the many kingdoms of the land, and there are surprises and revelations that kept me guessing at what would happen next. Melina Marchetta¿s writing is absolutely brilliant. She doesn¿t rely on flowery language or flashy gimmicks to create a good story. Instead, she artfully crafts a solid, mesmerizing tale through the use of superb character development and brilliant plotting.If you decide to pick up this book, even though fantasy isn¿t your thing, I urge you not to give up on it you don¿t get it at first. Read at least the first quarter of the story (approximately the end of Chapter Eight). I was hooked long before that, but I genuinely believe that you¿ll want to finish the book by the time you make it to that point in the story.
monsterofbooks on LibraryThing 22 days ago
You know when you see something truly breathtaking and your in awe over how beautiful it is, well I think that is the right thing to say about Finnikin of the Rock. It is everything that makes a story perfect, but the book talks about a dystopian world. Melina Marchetta creates a story that has hauntingly real imagery, with words that flow nicely like a calm lake. She gives enough description to easily understand the situation and the word, and won't have readers falling asleep. The maps in the book are easy to follow, and I found myself looking at it quite a few times. The world is well built and it's easy to picture, it is also unique in the fact that you can see the cultural difference between each land as the characters travel through it. The emotion is strong and well put and will have readers at lost for words. The readers can really feel sad, angry and horrified as they read about the exile and fever camps, and hear of the five days of the unspeakable. But you will also feel hope that maybe, by the end of the book the people will regain hold of Lumatere. The characters are developed nicely, in a way that will have you make a soft spot for each one of them in your heart. Evanjalin and Froi were probably my favorite two characters. Evanjalin was such a strong, passionate and hopeful women/girl in the story. Anybody would envy that, and I certainly was proud to read about a strong women lead. Froi was someone who you hate at first, but then after hearing his POV you really feel for him. He's just a mischievous s little boy who envies people around him and wants to belong. Something that anyone can relate to. A lot of the situations were truthful, and how they were dealt with was faithful to how I can imagine them being laid out. Example of this is Trevanion's & Lady Beatriss relationship.The story's narration, which was from different characters POV, was amazingly well crafted. The romance in the story (between Evanjalin & Finnikin) was really well developed. Probably the first real romance that I truly enjoyed the development of. It wasn't to slow and it wasn't to fast, it was just right. It felt honest and good.Some of the plot twists were a bit obvious. What I would of liked to seen developed more was more knowledge of the impostor king. Who was he? I also think the battle to regain Lumatere should of been more descriptive and longer. It was a bit short, and was sort of a downer as it was what the whole book was leading up to.Usually I don't read fantasy, I find it to confusing. I enjoyed Eragon but found it confusing. It might of been because I was young when I read it. But this novel wasn't confusing and probably the first fantasy I actually really enjoyed. I really hope there is a sequel, though this book does work as a stand-alone to. So when I was reading the author's bio, I was very surprised to find that this was her first fantasy: "I was told often that I couldn't write fantasy unless I had read all the greats and knew the conventions well, but I think the first step to writing good fantasy is knowing this world we live in well. I wanted to look closely at that---where loss of faith, loss of homeland and identity, displacement of spirit, and breakdown of community are common--- because these are the scenes in today's media that affect me most. In this sense, the book is a search for identity in the same way that my other novels are." -Melina Marchetta. You wouldn't think after reading this book, that this was her first fantasy. And if this review doesn't intrigue you enough, well then take it from Kristin Cashore: "The world of this book is dark and beautiful and utterly believable; and, as I¿ve come to expect of Marchetta¿s work, the characters are wonderfully complex. Here is an author who writes fantasy as well as she writes realism ¿ and in the case of Melina Marchetta, that¿s high praise, indeed!"The last thing I want to talk about is the ending. BEST ENDING EVER. I mean I've read endings that are s
brainlair on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Now on the cusp of manhood, Finnikin, who was a child when the royal family of Lumatere was brutally murdered and replaced by an imposter, reluctantly joins forces with an enigmatic young novice and fellow-exile, who claims that her dark dreams will lead them to a surviving royal child and a way to regain the throne of Lumatere.I was excited when Finnikin and Sir Topher picked up Evanjalin. She knew things she shouldn't and she wasn't afraid to use the information she needed. I was disappointed when they picked up the thief. He was unnecessary. I was excited when Evanjalin helped Finnikin "break" into the prison. Disappointed when the thief tried to rape her. That's how this book was for me; alternating between exciting and disappointing. While enjoyed the book, small parts were disappointing. Overall I loved the twists and turns and the not completely resolved issues. The idea of trying to bring a kingdom that been torn apart back together. To start over in a place they no longer knew. That's intriguing. People have their memories. They aren't all good or all bad. But the same story is remembered differently based on who you are and who you've been. Finnikin wanted things the way they were but you can't really go back home. In this case both home and Finnikin had changed.Still not sure what I think about this one. It's definitely one to add to the library and will be a great discussion book. But I wanted more from this book. Maybe a second read is necessary...
OmaRoses on LibraryThing 22 days ago
This is an amazing, beautifully written book that allows you to escape into a mesmerizing world full of love, adventure, tears, sadness, pride, honor and victory. Marchetta's writing was SPECTACULAR; it was vivid and simply brilliant!This was a page turner that I couldn't put down. If you enjoy reading, this is a MUST READ!
jenniferthomp75 on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Excellent tale of love, longing and returning to one's home.A dark spell has been cast over Finnikin's homeland of Lumatere after the royal family was murdered.Traveling across the world with his mentor, Finnikin meets a strange girl named Evanjalin who claims she can enter people's sleep and also claims to know that one of the prince's from the royal family is still alive.Wonderfully paced with thoughtful, intelligent characters, this book is a must-read. Marchetta, a former Printz winner, has found a new genre for her writing. I hope she writes more fantasy because this was wonderful! Definitely a Mock Printz consideration.
lilibrarian on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Finnikin was a child when his homeland was conquered and cursed. Now he is on his way back with a strange girl who claims to walk the streets of their home in her dreams.
Tatiana_G on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Knowing and admiring Melina Marchetta for her excellent contemporary YA novels, I was reluctant to read her first fantasy effort. I shouldn't have hesitated - this book is a success. Actually, I even found myself amused by the fact that it was blurbed by Kristin Cashore, an American YA fantasy writer, because clearly Marchetta is much better at it even though she had never written a fantasy before.This novel offers everything that a good fantasy story should offer: a well established world (with maps! love those), an interesting political intrigue, magic, a quest to save one's homeland, a love story, and a cast of memorable character with compelling back stories. On top of it, Finnikin of the Rock is a story about uniting a country torn by an invasion and dark magic, and about a man who struggles to accept his destiny.The strength of the book undoubtedly lies in the way Marchetta depicts interpersonal relationships and human nature - this is something that is so well done in her contemporary novels (Looking for Alibrandi, Saving Francesca, Jellicoe Road). Her characters are real, their struggles are real.The weakest part of the story is pacing. I think the novel is a little too long. It's not that it gets boring, but the length of the Finnikin's quest seems to lose momentum and when the climax of the story finally comes, it is rather understated. All Marchetta's books are a little anti-climatic, but it is more noticeable in this fantasy novel, because this is the genre where you expect a story to end with a bang.However, as a whole, Finnikin of the Rock is a satisfying, thought provoking work. According to Melina Marchetta, her intent was to create a story about a world "where loss of faith, loss of homeland and identity, displacement of spirit, and breakdown of community are common." That she definitely accomplished.
NickF. on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Finnikin is on the cusp of his manhood while being apprentice to Sir Topher. For the past 10 years Finninkin and Sir Topher have been traveling the lands that surrond their cursed kingdom. Before a massacre of the roayal family, Finninik, Lucian, and Balhatazr make a pledge on "Three Wonders Rock". People are trapped in their cursed kingdom while Finninik and Sir Topher are traveling the kingdoms surronding theirs learning the languages and trying to help exiles.My own opinion of this is great. Melina Marchetta has proven that she is a great writer. This book blew my mind away, their are some parts that are for mature readers only but it's still good. A part I don't like about this book is that Finninik's father Captain of the Guard is in a mine prison in Sarlen. But they plow on through the book and it's a best seller honestly. Overall its a 5/5.
Aerrin99 on LibraryThing 22 days ago
A truly excellent and heartbreaking novel about a people exiled from their home nation and the fight of a young man and a mysterious girl to help return them a decade later. Lumatere had once been prosperous and stable, with a bevy of Princesses and a Prince set to ensure the continuation of the royal line. But a betrayal ended with a massacred royal family, and the violence done to the people who lived in the forests of Lumatere in the aftermath led to a curse that locked the kingdom away from the rest of the world by an impenetrable barrier.Those outside Lumatere at the time have been left homeless for the past decade. They are poverty-stricken, outcasts, plagued by fever and death and despair. Finnikin's father was the captain of the guard and he grew up with the royal family. In the ten years since the exile, he has traveled with Sir Topher in an effort to ease the plight of displaced Lumatereans and, perhaps, to find them a new home. Early in the story they pick up a mysterious girl named Evanjalin, a novice of the Goddess who can walk in dreams and claims that the prince Balthazar is still alive and will be able to break the curse. Thus starts what could be a predictable and safe tale of overcoming odds to restore the kingdom of Lumatere - but Marchetta deftly saves it from both. She writes with a heart-breaking beauty that tackles everything from a growing romance that both parties are wary of to the very real cruelties experienced by the characters in her book. There are dark places here - the exiles of Lumatere do not feel fantastical. They feel very, very real, and your heart aches with every story of illness, homelessness, poverty, violence, and rape. More than any other book, this one has made me think about displaced people in our own world, which I think is a triumph for any fantasy tome. The politics and magic of her world are both complicated and interesting, but the real shine here are her characters. Finnikin is nineteen at the book's beginning, Evanjalin is younger, and both are struggling with being thrust into leadership roles that they aren't sure they want, but that they know are completely necessary. They doubt each other, they doubt their advisors, they doubt themselves. Their choices are difficult, and the reader feels the weight of that. It is simply impossible not to cheer for them. Finnikin of the Rock is one of those books that is surprising in its loveliness and almost shocking in its depth. I did not expect it to be what it is, and I did not expect it to linger in my mind like it did - it was a very, very welcome surprise.
stephxsu on LibraryThing 22 days ago
FINNIKIN OF THE ROCK proves once and for all that Melina Marchetta can do no wrong. This high fantasy novel is Marchetta¿s first foray outside of contemporary realism, but she writes in this genre as easily as the other. Finnikin¿s tale will appeal to the wandering soul in search of the grandiose, miraculous, and larger-than-life.
callmecayce on LibraryThing 22 days ago
I'd read Jellicoe Road by Marchetta and was eager to read another one of her books. I'm not a big fan of fantasy and so I was a bit skeptical, but by the end of the novel I was pleasantly surprised by how much I liked it. Granted, getting to the end was quite a trial, the writing is excellent and the plot moves along, but I just found it extremely laboring to get through. It was worth the effort, but Jellicoe is by far the better book.
BookAddictDiary on LibraryThing 22 days ago
When Finnikin was young, the royal family was brutally murdered and overthrown, and his family was forced into exile. With a usurper now on the throne of Finnikin's homeland, Finnkin has been training as under Sir Topher in hopes to one day put his skills to go use. When rumors begin to circulate that Balthazar, legitimate heir to the throne, may have somehow survived, Finnikin teams up with a novice named Evanjalin, who has the ability to enter people's dreams. Together, the pair set out to find Balthazar and bring their people out of exile.With such an interesting setup, it's hard to believe that Finnikin of the Rock could ever be boring -that, however, isn't quite true. The book starts off a little slow as author Marchetta introduces her complex, thoroughly-developed world, complete with slang and fairly unique mechanics. Though the story does get a little bogged down under all the explanation and vivid world detail, it picks up once the the exposition is taken care of and just doesn't let go. Filled with exciting intrigue, unexpected twists and fun characters, Finnikin of the Rock is an exciting and enjoyable adventure for readers of all ages.
Suzanne520 on LibraryThing 22 days ago
This is the kind of book you read when you want to fall in love with more than just a story. I fell in love with everything about this book. The characters, especially Finnikin, Evanjalin and Trevanion, had so much heart, courage, and strength. I loved the setting of this story as well, and the author writes so beautifully and descriptively that when you put the book down, it takes more than a few moments to fully come out of the world she created. The story itself was so interesting and great! It truly was original and it often surprised me, which is rare for me! Basically, I loved this book and highly recommend it!
wsquared on LibraryThing 22 days ago
Finnikin of the Rock, an epic fantasy tale, is a marked departure from Melina Marchetta's usual contemporary realistic fiction, but she has crafted a rich, complex world full of intriguing and mysterious characters. The strong socio-political undercurrents have parallels to our own world, but they don't overwhelm the core story about Finnikin's search for a homeland for his displaced kingdom and his acceptance of his destiny to become king.
ashooles on LibraryThing 22 days ago
This book was a beautifully, written, well told story of a fantasy land which had been attacked and destroyed. The characters were well chosen and well described and the Evanjalin/Isaboe part made me very interested.In some parts, I became a little confused, but really, this book was really good. I couldn't put it down.
Squishy133 on LibraryThing 22 days ago
I really wanted this book to be better than it was. I had heard so much hype about it that I thought, `great, something that¿s really going to capture my attention¿, but I found it sadly lacking.This isn¿t to say that it was a bad book. It was well written and had some nice description. At times it was very engaging and I wanted to know what was going to happen next, but there were parts of this book that I just didn¿t like.I didn¿t really connect with the characters, and that was my main reason, I think, for not liking the book. I thought Evanjalin was a bit of a cow really, especially towards the end of the book, so she just annoyed me. I didn¿t like Finnikin¿s dad, and I found Finnikin only `OK¿. The only character I really liked was Froi, and there were only a few times when we got to hear his point of view, and for me, they were the highlights of the story.I do however, love the cover. Which is irrelevant to the story or my rating, but it was very captivating. I just like to stare at it sometimes¿There were some alright twists in the book, but I felt sometimes things could have been better explained. When I finished I still wasn¿t exactly sure why the dark days occurred and what exactly happened. It was all very vague if you ask me.Nonetheless, I don¿t want to make this book sound like utter torment, because it wasn¿t. It had its charms and its good parts, but it just wasn¿t my piece of cake. I really don¿t know what the hype was about.