The First World War

The First World War

by John Keegan
4.0 22

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Overview

The First World War by John Keegan

The highest praise greeted the hardcover publication of this engrossing, brilliant book - THE definitive story of the Great War, the war that created the modern world, unleashing the terrors of mechanized warfare and mass death, and establishing the political fault lines that imperil European stability to this day.

Keegan takes us behind the scenes of the doomed diplomatic efforts to avert the catastrophe; he probes the haunting question of how a civilization at the height of its cultural achievement and prosperity could propel itself toward ruin with so little provocation; his panoramic narrative brings to life the nightmarish engagements whose names have become legend - Verdun, the Somme, Gallipoli - as with profound sympathy, he explores the minds of Joffe, Haig and Hindenburg, the famed generals who directed the cataclysm.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780676972245
Publisher: Knopf Canada
Publication date: 06/13/2000
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 528
Product dimensions: 5.22(w) x 7.98(h) x 1.03(d)

About the Author

John Keegan was for many years senior lecturer in military history at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, and has been a fellow at Princeton University and a visiting professor of history at Vassar College. He is the author of twenty books, including the acclaimed The Face of Battle and The Second World War. He lived in Wiltshire, England until his death in 2012.

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The First World War 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was great for me, especially since I didn't know the causes of World War I as much as for WWII. Keegan gives a full explanation of the incident that triggered it and the context behind all of it. Then, he provides an excellent account of the war from the first days to the very end. He also tells us more about the most important men involved in it without forgetting to tell us about more than just the battles and their technical side. This book is a great overview of the conflict, its causes, its meaning and its consequences.
otwgwg More than 1 year ago
Started by trying to listen to the CD: Ugh!!! Worst I've ever heard! Prebble is mush-mouthed. And what's worse, the content/context of the text he is reading is such that without the 15 maps included in the printed version, one is quickly lost among movements of obscurely-named divisions and armies advancing to and retreating from equally obscure villages, rivers and mountains. So, alas, I was forced (by curiosity and a burning desire to find maps of what the hell Keegan's talking about) to the used bookstore. There, having confirmed that, indeed, Keegan (or, more likely, his editor) had the sense/decency to include the aforementioned 15 maps in the book, I purchased a copy. Yeah, Keegan covers the whole four years, including the basic events which led to its unnecessary start. But, alas, I believe that many, many authors have done so more logically, cogently and readably: See Barbara Tuchman's "The Guns of August" and, for the battles on the Gallipoli peninsula (and the key to success/failure, the sea-battles in the Dardanelles and Sea of Marmara -- facets which Keegan almost completely ignores), see Alan Moorehead's "Gallipoli". Then there is Keegan's voice, which is often confusing, with verbs, adverbs, and modifying phrases reversed in order or distantly removed from their object in long, convoluted sentences not familiar to the ear expecting standard English. Sentences more reminiscent of Faulkner than of Hemingway. Thus, Keegan's points, perhaps critical to the outcome of a given action or subsequent reaction, are often obscurely or overly referenced and conditioned, though apparently not intended to be under-emphasized, through the insertion of names, places, dates, ground conditions, weather, preceding events, or other numerous and relevent (or not) facts, are lost. If you like that previous sentence, you'll love Keegan! I speculate that Keegan dictated the text, and that it was only lightly edited. On several occasions, facts are repeated verbatim three or four pages apart. His references to direction - north, south, east and west - and to rivers, towns or other landmarks are often inconsistent with those implied by the maps. Are the maps wrong? Is Keegan picturing a battle in his mind which does not match reality? I got through it. But as a result, I am convinced that there was a whole lot more to (and perhaps a whole lot different than) World War I than Keegan tells us -- or perhaps than he knows. --- gwg
Guest More than 1 year ago
Mr. Keegan continues his string of excellent historical war accounts. This work is remarkable in many ways, but its greatest asset is the author's ability to distill the massively, complex history of the Great War into a single volume. His insights are often fresh and perceptive. I particularly enjoyed his personal histories and wish he'd included many more. And the questions raised on his last page are truly important. The work's few minor flaws need not dissuade neophyte or experienced readers. It suffers most seriously from a deficit of maps. A standard atlas remedies the problem, but I suspect Mr. Keegan overestimates American understanding of world geography. Civilian privations are given slight shift. And I believe Mr. Keegan's generosity toward Generals French, Haig and Joffre (at a minimum) is far too complimentary. They are responsible for the wholesale butchering of countless innocent soldiers, as the author so well documents. But their cavalier, unsympathetic dispositions are inexcusable, regardless of Mr. Keegan's attempts to explain of their points of view. Yet this history is very much worth reading. I followed with great interest Mr. Keegan's Near and Middle Eastern discourses. He proves himself a master of the history of sea warfare in his presentations of naval battles and technologies. He deftly positions Lenin, Hitler, Churchill, Hindenburg and many other important personalities in their appropriate roles. We are again in debt to Mr. Keegan for this concise, excellent book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story is interesting even after almost 100 years, but the author abuses English grammar badly. For example, he commonly splits compound verbs not just with a single adverb (bad enough), but by phrases and even sentences, so that the subject noun is separated by its verb by as many as 4 and 5 lines of the writing. Moreover, faulty reference is common. Both examples (and a number of others could be cited) result in difficult reading, and the need to re-read many of the sentences and even paragraphs. And that is demanding too much patience from the reader. Obviously, Keegan needs a much better, and possibly more forceful reviewer/editor.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
too much detail not enough insight
glauver More than 1 year ago
When he writes of the common soldiers caught in the endless horror of WW1, Keegan's writing comes alive with compassion, but his portraits of the generals lack depth and we don't get to know them as individuals. Another flaw is his uneven coverage of the conflict; although the Russian and French fronts well, he neglects much of the action in other theaters. He begins to tell of the war in Africa, leaves it, and never returns. He also says little of the events in the Middle East, a struggle that set the stage for today’s Arab-Israeli tensions. By no means is this a bad book, but I recommend G. J. Meyer’s A world Undone as a better starting place for the average reader or student.
Anonymous 10 months ago
I have nit read the book but u really want to hopefully i will like it for my report
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ToddS1982 More than 1 year ago
I listen to a lot of audio books; this is the fastest narrated one I have yet heard. The speed was less than ideal for the complex subject material, which tended to the dry side with its details of military maneuvers. The book is recommended more for those who specialize in military history, especially strategy and tactics, than it is for the general public.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
The First World War does not seem to demand the attention as does the second. A book such as this puts them together in the proper context. The Great War as the precursor to the Second World War. Keegan decribes the theaters of operations, the complex personalities, and the poltics in enough detail to understand the terrible conflict. He may be the greatest living historian and this may be his most impressive work to date.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Keegan again proves himself one of the world's finest military historians. His methods are virtually flawless, and the portrait he paints of the first war is so vivid in its sheer foolishness and desperation that the reader is almost drawn to tears by the conclusion. A must read for any student of military history, serious or casual.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The greatest compliment that I can give this book is that it made me want to read more about the causes of the Great War, and how it was fought. It is a wonderful introduction for anyone even slightly interested in one of the great defining events of the last century. Hopefully it will effect others the way it did me, and lead them to explore other perspectives of this horrible and destructive war. In understanding what and how this happened, perhaps we can understand how to avoid such man-made catastrophies in the future
Guest More than 1 year ago
Keegan does a great job providing the background events leading up to the war as well as a detailed history of the war's first 2 years. Book could use a little more detail re events of 1917-18 and American involvement in the war.