Five Flavors of Dumb

Five Flavors of Dumb

by Antony John

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780803734333
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 11/11/2010
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.88(w) x 11.80(h) x 3.15(d)
Lexile: 890L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author

Antony John is a stay-at-home dad who writes by nightÑthe only job that allows him to wear his favorite pair of sweatpants all the time. He lives with his family in St. Louis, Missouri.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"I loved it and laughed out loud. Hilarious and so smart. Dumb proves that everyone, no matter what, deserves to be heard." -Catherine Gilbert Murdoch, author of Dairy Queen

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Five Flavors of Dumb 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 84 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
3 words - READ THIS BOOK! Great story, interesting characters, not just for young adults. The premise and the cover reeled me in, but once I started reading I was hooked and I did not want the book to end. It's about high school, music, family, friendships, finding yourself, and much more! I don't want to spoil it by telling too much, you just have to read it yourself - you'll be glad you did!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well crafted story. This is one I am putting into my "recommend for my daughter" pile. Some language but I didn't find it to be excessive. I'm in my 30'syears and I fell in love with the book, i think the issues and relatioships the story deal with makes it appealing for teens and up.
Lawral More than 1 year ago
John could have made the band of high schoolers trying to make it big the set-up a whole book in and of itself, albeit a much less satisfying one. Instead of being a book all about the band, this is a book all about how Piper, their manager, deals with them. But it's also a book about Piper and her life at school and at home. Woven through her parents reactions to Dumb are Piper's reactions to her family. Her maternal grandparents (now deceased) were both deaf and very into deaf culture. They instilled a sense of pride in Piper, along with the sense that she has the ability to do anything she wants to do regardless of her lack of hearing. Piper's mother and brother are both fluent in ASL (American Sign Language), but her father does not sign at all. Her infant sister was born deaf. In her, Piper saw a kind of ally. Or, she did until her parents raided Piper's college fund to get her sister a cochlear implant (a surgically implanted device that can restore hearing to severely deaf persons). Betrayal and closing doors all in one. She hopes Dumb will be her ticket out of town and to the college of her dreams. The juxtaposition of why Dumb's different members, Piper included, are in the band (money, fame, the music (said very seriously), and various crushes on other band members) cause problems. All the band drama keeps this from turning into a problem novel about a moderately severe deaf girl in a hearing family and high school. Though the fact that Piper is deaf comes up over and over and over again in her dealings with various people in the music business as well as with the band itself (and, sadly, her family), it is never Piper's defining characteristic, just as Kallie's skin color is never hers (though she is proud of her mother's self-proclaimed status as "the first African American to go grunge" (p160)*). The best part about Five Flavors of Dumb really is Piper herself. She has such a strong voice, sense of herself, and talent for sarcasm. I also loved her developing relationship with the girls of Dumb, Tasha and Kallie. I LOVE great girl friendship books, and by the end this one totally fit the bill. And watching Piper's rock music education was fabulous (the Seattle setting helped a bit). I grew up listening to Hendrix and other musicians of that era, and I was in middle school and just getting into Nirvana when Kurt Cobain killed himself. I can't imagine coming to these musicians as a senior in high school. Seeing them through Piper and the rest of Dumb was like "meeting" them all over again. Book source: ARC picked up at ALA *Quotes and page numbers are from an uncorrected proof and may not match the published copy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I feel so awful at how I didn't know this book existed on Monday. I had half a mind to leave it in the library. The title caught me, the story kept me. Halfway in to the book, I thought it was over, but the *word that does not even exist yet* kept coming. I read the hard copy, and now I NEED it for my nook to read EVERYWHERE! Buy it. You will not be dissapointed. Unless you take offense to critisicm. Or hate rock. Or deaf people...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved it! The first page or two was a little slow (just to be honest) but it was a really good book. I liked the fact that Piper still did her best with the band even though she couldn't really hear them. It was a good story.
StalkinTheBooks More than 1 year ago
I've never read a book with a deaf protagonist in it before. I also don't have any hearing disabilities, but author Antony John made me feel as though I might understand what its like to be deaf. I'm glad that the novel is written in first person because I got to feel all of Piper's emotion towards her deafness, family and band with her. Piper's someone trying hard to figure out where she fits in, not just at school, but at home too, which made her a very easy character to relate to. She's also extremely sarcastic, incredibly smart and very determined. She refuses to let her disability stop her from achieving what she wants, whether its getting into her dream college or managing her high school rock band. I adore the relationship that Piper shares with her brother Finn, because its such a honest and realist one. They bicker and annoy each other just like siblings always do, but they also really care and look out for each other too. Finn is also quite mature for his age, which I found very refreshing, since so often younger characters can be rather obnoxious. I love how Piper's mom and dad are portrayed as well rounded characters. They come with their own set of problems, so they're not perfect, but they try to be active in their daughter's life, even when she doesn't want them to be. It's so nice to see a family that although a bit dysfunctional, genuinely do care about each other. As for the band, I loved how each member of Dumb was so completely different. Early on it seems like everyone is just a stereotype, but as they spend more time together, you start to see different sides to all of them. I'm sure that everyone who reads the novel will find at least one band member they can relate to, if not more. My favorites were Ed and Tash. I adored Ed for his constant willingness to help Piper and Tash for her take no crap attitude towards life. Since Five Flavors of Dumb is about a high school rock band in Seattle, I really appreciated all the musical references to artists like Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix. It added so much atmosphere to the novel, since these were musicians that not only changed an entire city, but the whole landscape of rock music. The novel has a nice steady pace to it, which made it pretty hard to put down. I really did love everything about this book, I was even sad when I got to the last page because I wanted to spend so much more time with Piper and Dumb. Here's hoping for more... I don't normally mention my favorite quote, but I really loved this one: "Don't worry about wanting to change; start worrying when you don't feel like changing anymore. And in the meantime, enjoy every version of yourself you ever meet, because not everybody who discovers their true identity likes what they find." ~pg. 234
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was such a good read, I myself am someone who absolutely loves music and reading this book I felt like we had a bond going on, me and the book. The main character Piper is deaf and currently in need of some major money thanks to her parents and her new sister, and a band in her school challenges her to to be their manager and make them and herself money. Everybody thinks thats it's ridiculous that someone who can't hear music is managing a band, but Piper is stronger then anybody thinks and surprises many people. Along the book new characters join in, and new friends are made and feelings that have been hidden are finally presented. You will fall in love with Piper and her friends (but not all of them). Everything about this book is great, the humor, the characters and their growing relationships, the family drama, and of course the music (We love you Jimi Hendrix and Kurt Cobain). I would recommend this book to everybody.
jadaykennedy More than 1 year ago
John tells the story of eighteen-year-old Piper, who is deaf, and becomes the unlikely manager of a rock band, Dumb. Crazy, right? A deaf girl, managing a band? Well, it doesn¿t seem crazy when you read it. Piper is a capable person, who is strong and determined. If only all of us in the hearing world were as confident and self assured as she is. She even manages to fuse these five very different personalities into a group that works together. The winner of the Schneider Family Book Award 2010. Highly recommended.
Dawn Katolick More than 1 year ago
really enjoyed seeing life through a teenage deaf girl. it shows the difficulties she goes through with managing a band and daily life. she realize people are more than what they seem.
bookwormygirl on LibraryThing 24 days ago
This book was AWESOME! Piper is one hell of a leading lady. She never intended to end up the manager of a rock band, a very unlikely role for someone who is deaf. But nevertheless, she finds that being Dumb's manager might be the best thing to happen to her. I immediately identified with Piper. I'm sure most girls and women can. She is struggling with all sorts of issues from self-esteem, family, lack of popularity at school, etc. I can't even begin to tell you what great characters you'll find in this story. They are all quirky and eclectic yet come together so perfectly. There is great character development and maturity and I'm sure anyone can relate with at least one of them (if not more).Piper's issues with her parents raiding her college fund in order to buy a cochlear implant for her sister was the more serious tone in the story. I was intrigued to see how Piper reacted to this. And was surprised that she reacted not in anger that her college funds had somewhat depleted, but that the bond she shared with her deaf sister would be severed. The one thing they had in common would be no longer. It was touching and definitely pulled on the heartstrings. I loved the tone of this novel. It is told in a very fresh and fun voice. I loved the way it portrayed Piper's family life (dysfunctional, yet loving), how a deaf girl can learn to love music, making new friends, starting new relationships and even a little romance was thrown in there. Irresistibly hard to put down. One of the best books I've read this year.
ethel55 on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Just finished this fine piece of teen lit and it was wonderful. There's not a vampire, pixie, faerie, or werewolf to be found, but I think there is a big audience for the five dissimilar members of the North Seattle High band called Dumb, Dared by the leader of the band Jared to try and get them a booking and some pay, Piper Vaughan takes on the role of manager. The fact that Piper is deaf is clear to all, but doesn't confine her to page after page of signing. All the members of the band have strong personalities and some, the ego to go with it. Piper learns how to handle them and be true to herself as well. Piper's relationship with her little brother Finn is a great side to the story as well as the odd relationship with her parents.
molliekay on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Piper's deaf baby sister has just received cochlear implants, and she finds out that they were paid for with Piper's college fund. The thing is, Piper is also deaf, and has had the same hearing aids since she was seven. When the opportunity arises to manage the band Dumb and make some money, she jumps at the chance. She soon realizes that it won't be as easy as she thought it would be. Even though the main character is deaf, the story isn't centered on it. Instead, the book focuses on the world of music Piper has just entered and the dysfunctional band mates she has taken on. A great book for any music fan.
ShaEliPar on LibraryThing 24 days ago
I've never read a book with a deaf protagonist in it before. I also don't have any hearing disabilities, but author Antony John made me feel as though I might understand what its like to be deaf. I'm glad that the novel is written in first person because I got to feel all of Piper's emotion towards her deafness, family and band with her. Piper's someone trying hard to figure out where she fits in, not just at school, but at home too, which made her a very easy character to relate to. She's also extremely sarcastic, incredibly smart and very determined. She refuses to let her disability stop her from achieving what she wants, whether its getting into her dream college or managing her high school rock band.I adore the relationship that Piper shares with her brother Finn, because its such a honest and realist one. They bicker and annoy each other just like siblings always do, but they also really care and look out for each other too. Finn is also quite mature for his age, which I found very refreshing, since so often younger characters can be rather obnoxious. I love how Piper's mom and dad are portrayed as well rounded characters. They come with their own set of problems, so they're not perfect, but they try to be active in their daughter's life, even when she doesn't want them to be. It's so nice to see a family that although a bit dysfunctional, genuinely do care about each other.As for the band, I loved how each member of Dumb was so completely different. Early on it seems like everyone is just a stereotype, but as they spend more time together, you start to see different sides to all of them. I'm sure that everyone who reads the novel will find at least one band member they can relate to, if not more. My favorites were Ed and Tash. I adored Ed for his constant willingness to help Piper and Tash for her take no crap attitude towards life.Since Five Flavors of Dumb is about a high school rock band in Seattle, I really appreciated all the musical references to artists like Kurt Cobain and Jimi Hendrix. It added so much atmosphere to the novel, since these were musicians that not only changed an entire city, but the whole landscape of rock music.The novel has a nice steady pace to it, which made it pretty hard to put down. I really did love everything about this book, I was even sad when I got to the last page because I wanted to spend so much more time with Piper and Dumb. Here's hoping for more...I don't normally mention my favorite quote, but I really loved this one:"Don't worry about wanting to change; start worrying when you don't feel like changing anymore. And in the meantime, enjoy every version of yourself you ever meet, because not everybody who discovers their true identity likes what they find." ~pg. 234
TheKinuk on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Im not going to be articulate about this book. I loved it so much. I spent a day sitting by a river in the sun and read it in one go. I smiled and laughed out loud and even came close to tears. Perfect Awesome READ THIS BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
stephxsu on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Piper, a moderately deaf high school senior, unexpectedly finds herself the manager of a high school band by the culturally enlightened name of Dumb. Her job is to get Dumb some paying gigs, but Piper soon finds out that being a manager consists of much more than simply financial savvy. Piper must deal with musical shortcomings, in-band tensions, a skeptical and uncomprehending family, and, perhaps, most of all, her doubt in her own ability to break out of her quiet good-girl mold and demand that the world listen to her.Antony John¿s novel would more appropriately be called Five Flavors of AWESOME. This rocking good book will make you want to jump up and cheer, for wonderful characters, great narration, and an absorbing and uplifting tale.I¿m really quite bowled over at how well John captures the voice of a teenage girl. Piper may be deaf, but she struggles with many of the same issues as other teenagers: her dreams of independence and acceptance battle her sense of familial obligation, she wishes she could blend into the crowd yet simultaneously wants to be respected. Incredibly, Piper never falls into the YA cliché of the smart and quiet good girl who breaks out of her shell. She is down-to-earth and resilient despite years of having to struggle against the current, particularly her family¿s subpar ways of dealing with her deafness. She is truly a character that I would be proud to call a friend, and gives contemporary YA female protagonists everywhere a good name.A story cannot propel itself on the strength of a well-written protagonist alone, and happily supporting characters in FIVE FLAVORS OF DUMB are just as fascinating, just as complex. The band members different personalities and problems with one another are believable and add a good amount of conflict to the story without being too messy or overwhelming. The changes that Piper and her family undergo in their relationships with one another truly take the cake, however. It is subtle yet prominent, optimistic without wandering into unrealistic happily-ever-afters.FIVE FLAVORS OF DUMB is not simply a book about the music business, or being deaf. It is, rather, the story of an incredible girl who learns how to be proud of who she is, and beautiful in her confidence. Highly recommended for those who enjoy a strong read that reminds us about why we love contemporary YA: for that gem of a character into whose journey we get irrevocably swept.
YAaddict on LibraryThing 24 days ago
As soon as I heard this story was about a rock band with a teenage band manager as the protagonist, I knew I wanted to read it (Okay, so the cover was the first reason, but that was the second). Add the fact that the protagonist also happens to be deaf and I was very intrigued. What I found was a fun story with a big heart. It was much more emotional than I first expected, in a very good way.Piper was a fabulous character that I easily clicked with. She had many layers to her. When she is challenged to find the band a gig by the end of the month she takes it on. She needs the money for college, since her parents drained her college fund paying for her baby sister's cochlear implant. I felt all the emotions Piper felt about her sister getting the implant. This story isn't just a rock band story. It's also a story about family, and all the issues that come with it.Piper had great chemistry with the band, which made for a lot of great scenes. The band members all had their own traits and personalities. Sometimes with these stories, a few supporting characters are just there and flat. But each supporting character in Five Flavors, especially Piper's family members, are fleshed out and important to the story. The setting for Five Flavors is Seattle, the birth place of grunge rock. I enjoyed the music references that this added to the story, like when the band visited Kurt Cobain's mansion. The only complaint that I have was that I wasn't immediately drawn into the story. The first few chapters could have moved along a bit faster. But once the story got moving, I was completely invested. So if you find yourself thinking the same thing with the first few chapters in this book, stick with it. It picks up.I am so happy I decided to read this fabulous story. Don't let the title fool you. Five Flavors of Dumb is much bigger than just a rock band story. If you enjoy contemporary YA, you should definitely pick this one up.
lawral on LibraryThing 24 days ago
John could have made the band of high schoolers trying to make it big the set-up a whole book in and of itself, albeit a much less satisfying one. Instead of being a book all about the band, this is a book all about how Piper, their manager, deals with them. But it's also a book about Piper and her life at school and at home. Woven through her parents reactions to Dumb are Piper's reactions to her family. Her maternal grandparents (now deceased) were both deaf and very into deaf culture. They instilled a sense of pride in Piper, along with the sense that she has the ability to do anything she wants to do regardless of her lack of hearing. Piper's mother and brother are both fluent in ASL (American Sign Language), but her father does not sign at all. Her infant sister was born deaf. In her, Piper saw a kind of ally. Or, she did until her parents raided Piper's college fund to get her sister a cochlear implant (a surgically implanted device that can restore hearing to severely deaf persons). Betrayal and closing doors all in one. She hopes Dumb will be her ticket out of town and to the college of her dreams.The juxtaposition of why Dumb's different members, Piper included, are in the band, money, fame, the music (said very seriously), and various crushes on other band members, cause problems. All the band drama keeps this from turning into a problem novel about a moderately severe deaf girl in a hearing family and high school. Though the fact that Piper is deaf comes up over and over and over again in her dealings with various people in the music business as well as with the band itself (and, sadly, her family), it is never Piper's defining characteristic, just as Kallie's skin color is never hers (though she is proud of her mother's self-proclaimed status as "the first African American to go grunge" (p160)*).The best part about Five Flavors of Dumb really is Piper herself. She has such a strong voice, sense of herself, and talent for sarcasm. I also loved her developing relationship with the girls of Dumb, Tasha and Kallie. I LOVE great girl friendship books, and by the end this one totally fit the bill. And watching Piper's rock music education was fabulous (the Seattle setting helped a bit). I grew up listening to Hendrix and other musicians of that era (thanks Dad), and I was in middle school and just getting into Nirvana when Kurt Cobain killed himself (thanks Johanna). I can't imagine coming to these musicians as a senior in high school. Seeing them through Piper and the rest of Dumb was like "meeting" them all over again.Book source: ARC picked up at ALA*Quotes and page numbers are from an uncorrected proof and may not match the published copy.
missyreadsreviews on LibraryThing 24 days ago
I'm going to try to write this review without gushing too much about how it's one of my favorite reads of the century. I'm also going to try to prevent myself from ranting about how a GUY excelled at writing a book from a GIRL's POV. It makes me wonder if we females are getting a little too predictable/readable... Hmm.I digress.Okay, so, Five Flavors of Dumb IS on my list of best YA books of all time. I have backing, too. It's won the Schneider Family Teen Book Award and for good reason. Piper, your main girl in the story, is deaf. That doesn't make Piper an outcast in any way. She adapts well with reading lips and signing. As a matter of fact, Piper is pretty average yet strongly unique at the same time. What do I mean by that? She's smart, independent and funny, but she's not popular and never catches the eye of the popular boy at school. She sounds ordinary, yet she somehow manages to shine through on every page with her fierce determination and witty comments. She's also very human in that she has to deal with making mistakes, learning, moving on and struggles to understand her two parents who seem to put more time and effort into her infant sister than her.The story grips you not in the way that most books do by its action, but rather its intense emotional roller coaster that you go on with Piper as she grows and finally breaks out of her shell. Just when you think she's going to give up, she pulls out more strength that you never realize she has and saves the day.The supporting characters were all just as amazingly written, each with their own issues and quirks. I think the only ones I was annoyed with in the story was her parents, who drained Piper's funds given to her by her grandparents for college all so they could give her little sister a "chance to be normal" with a cochlear implant. The way they went about it was completely inappropriate and devoid of any concern for how it may affect Piper. If you ask me, it was almost selfish ... like they just couldn't bear the idea of having two deaf daughters. Thankfully, they do somewhat redeem themselves in the story. The love interest in the story completely blindsided me, although looking back I can say that it was there - I was just too wrapped up in other things to notice all of the hints at it within the story. I think of all the characters, Piper's brother Finn ended up with my heart. The love interest was all well and good, but Finn showed that he was much more than what met the eye - and my heart was pretty much jello there at the end.I don't think that I can do this book justice by just writing a review. Instead, you should go out and buy this book. Read it for yourself, and I dare you to not fall madly in love with it.
theepicrat on LibraryThing 24 days ago
I hesitated to read Five Flavors Of Dumb for many reasons. The cover seemed to cool to be true, and sometimes I find that intimidating! I read a lot of favorable reviews which you'd think that'd be a good thing, but oftentimes that makes me worry that I might have a defective gene and won't like it as much. Anyhow, safe to say, it was dumb of me to wait this long to pick up a copy because Five Flavors Of Dumb is everything but dumb.Piper makes for an excellent narrator - and can I say that I love her? She's a little intimidating at first - quick to argue, slow to apologize or say thank you, deaf but definitely capable of speaking her mind. Which makes it hard to know how exactly to approach her. Granted, I cannot blame her for feeling angry at her parents for giving her baby sister a chance to hear or her dad refusing to learn ASL at all. If anything, Piper is a little passive-aggressive - and when she's gets aggressive, she gets rather brutal in her honesty. Yet she starts to melt when she becomes the "mother hen" to the band members. Socializing outside her comfort zone changes Piper for the better, and it serves as a turning point in everyone's lives as they start to make compromises instead of war.Five Flavors Of Dumb is a little misleading in having you think there are only 5 flavors - or characters - to get to know. Prepare yourself to handle at least double that number. I think Antony John does an marvelous job at introducing each character and providing multiple facets to their personalities that literally blew me away. Piper's parents, for instance, almost steal the show away - and I desperately wanted to know more about them and their pasts. Her mom starts off as Piper's strong advocate, but slowly and unexpectedly turns against her. Her dad never seems to see Piper as Piper but someone disadvantaged, but sneakily redeems himself by the end.How many flavors is there of dumb? I think Five Flavors Of Dumb will definitely answer that question quite adequately, and I'm sure the answer will vary from sweetness to tartness to bitterness to melts-in-your-mouth-goodness.Not as edgy as I Wanna Be Your Joey Ramone or teeny-bop as AUDREY, WAIT!, but just as enjoyable with a memorable narrator who can easily be the next best thing since Please Ignore Vera Dietz entered the scene.
lisagibson on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Prior to reading this I heard tons of good buzz surrounding this book. It lived up to every bit of it. Pipers a great character. I couldn't imagine what it's like going through life being moderately deaf. We all struggle with our relationships at one time or another. I would think it's even more difficult when people realize that you're deaf. I did wrestle a bit with the fact that Piper feels she doesn't have a disability. Technically, by definition, she does. But I understood that she didn't want to be viewed as 'lesser than' or 'damaged goods'. That I can totally understand and agree with.There were parts of this book that were laugh-out-loud funny and others that were profoundly moving. Piper tries to find a way to create harmony among the band members and discover who she is along the way.I believe most kids 13 and up would appreciate this book. Oh, and I think the cover is pretty sweet! I'm giving it 4 1/2 rocking kisses!
ewyatt on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Piper lands herself a gig as the manager of Dumb, a rock band. Piper rocks! She is dealing with her hearing loss, relationship with her family, and her own perception of herself, all as she tries to figure out what it is to be a manager of a rock band and make some money doing it. A host of interesting characters in this book I didn't want to put down and then I didn't want to end.
lilibrarian on LibraryThing 24 days ago
Story of a deaf girl who becomes the manager of a rock band in her high school. She learns about music, power, relationships and herself while the band changes and advances.
chickey1981 on LibraryThing 29 days ago
Five Flavors of Dumb is hard to describe and simultaneously do it justice-- most superficially, it's about a band named Dumb and a deaf girl aptly named Piper who serves as their manager.Things I loved, and there are many. As a reader, my heart and soul is in characters, their development and their relationships with each other. And boy, was this book a rich breeding ground for that love. In most typical books, there are one or two characters who stand out in my mind as favorites, but in this book I loved them all. Each of Piper's family members is deftly drawn, loved and cherished. Both parents, Finn, and even little Grace is given their due. I was very moved by the conflict between Piper and her father. The pinnacle of that conflict was done pitch perfectly, and I remember gripping the pages, willing myself to get through it. I felt everything that she was feeling, and at the same time, I felt everything that her father was feeling. I loved how Piper and Finn started to see their father as a real person and not just as their father.Don't even get me started on the band members. I will always have a special place in my heart (and a bit of a crush) on Ed Chen. Tash was vibrantly painted, a splash of color on every page. And Kallie. Somehow I knew she had a big story to tell, and I wasn't disappointed.I am also a musician and loved all descriptions of the music, but the way the story is told, even non-music fanatics will be drawn into the rich description of the music and the band, the stories of the bands from the past and the great artists that came before.Other surprises: I cried. Twice. Which I do not do often. And two twists that I completely got wrong. And loved that I was wrong, because the answers were so right.The last thing I want to add is that I never questioned that Piper was a girl. I was so amazed that Antony John got the tone of a teenage girl so right. I was completely impressed because that is hard to do for even a female writer.If it's not already patently obvious, I was floored by this novel even though I started it with high expectations-- it completely delivered in ways that I never expected. Antony John will be a force to be reckoned with in the YA genre. I will definitely be following his novels eagerly for years to come.
thehidingspot on LibraryThing 29 days ago
Antony John's most recent novel follows Piper, a smart, pretty girl, as she attempts to manage the band Dumb, recent Battle of the Bands winner and her only chance to earn enough money to attend the college of her dreams. Dumb has taken Piper's high school world by storm, but they've got a lot to learn if they expect to go any further than impromptu shows on the school's front lawn. That's where Piper comes in... and she's got quite a job ahead of her. Not only is the band a mess and missing some key ingredients, Piper isn't completely sure of their sound - literally. Piper's hearing impaired, which adds a whole new level of difficulty to her task.FIVE FLAVORS OF DUMB is a story about a girl going to extreme lengths to achieve her dreams. John manages to make Piper both inspirational and relateable - no easy feat. There are often inspiring characters and relateable characters, but it's sometimes difficult to tag both of those descriptions onto one character. Piper reminds readers that dreams really can be reached, even if it doesn't happen quite the way you had planned.The one aspect of the novel that I found a tad distracting was the maturity of Piper and some of the other characters at points. It's understandable that characters might be a bit more mature and reasonable than real young adults, but there were certain parts of the novel where Piper's actions and thoughts didn't ring true. I still enjoyed her character, she just felt a little less real during these passages.FIVE FLAVORS OF DUMB is a welcome addition to my bookshelf. I've got a weakness for contemporary YA and I'm always happy to find a new title to add to my list of recommended titles!
Jennanana on LibraryThing 29 days ago
Piper is deaf, but she's the manager of a high school rock band. She can hear enough with her hearing aid, but when she is recruited to be the manager of the band, she finds out that there's more to a band than just a good sound. With each member being so different she has a hard time keeping everyone sane, including herself. Story about a powerful and strong willed girl who is out to prove that she has what it takes. Some bad language. Great references to classic rock bands like Jimi Hendrix, Nirvana, etc.