The Five Red Herrings (Lord Peter Wimsey Series #6)

The Five Red Herrings (Lord Peter Wimsey Series #6)

by Dorothy L. Sayers
3.6 5

Paperback(Reissue)

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Overview

The Five Red Herrings (Lord Peter Wimsey Series #6) by Dorothy L. Sayers

Dorothy L. Sayers paints a perfect picture of murder in this classic mystery—back in print and now available in trade paperback—in which Sir Peter Wimsey must ferret out a murderer in a Scottish artists' colony.

In the scenic Scottish village of Kirkcudbright, no one is disliked more than Sandy Campbell. When the painter is found dead at the foot of cliff, his easel standing above, no one is sorry to see him gone—especially six members of the close knit Galloway artists' colony.

The inimitable Lord Peter Wimsey is on the scene to determine the truth about Campbell's death. Piecing together the evidence, the aristocratic sleuth discovers that of the six suspected painters, five are red herrings, innocent of the crime. But just which one is the ingenious artist with a talent for murder?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780062341648
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 12/02/2014
Series: Lord Peter Wimsey Series , #6
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 368
Sales rank: 116,065
Product dimensions: 7.80(w) x 5.20(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Dorothy L. Sayers was born in 1893. She was one of the first women to be awarded a degree by Oxford University, and later she became a copywriter at an ad agency. In 1923 she published her first novel featuring the aristocratic detective Lord Peter Wimsey, who became one of the world's most popular fictional heroes. She died in 1957.

Date of Birth:

June 13, 1893

Date of Death:

December 17, 1957

Place of Birth:

Oxford, England

Education:

B.A., Oxford University, 1915; M.A., B.C.L., 1920

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Five Red Herrings 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous 9 months ago
This Wimsey mystery is very good, but it may not be everyone's cup of tea. It does rely heavily on train timetables in a, then, somewhat remote area of Scotland. The relevant tables are printed in the story. I wrote them out on a separate bit of paper, and that made keeping track (no pun intended) of the relevant details simple and convenient. The other point some readers may find distracting is Sayer's choice to have the Scottish characters use many Scottish colloquialisms and to have their dialogue spelled as it would sound when spoken with a thick brogue. I think it is charming, but it did take my inexperienced ear a few chapters to adjust to the flow of converstion between the English and the Scottish characters. The mystery, itself, is clever, and the red herrings run rampant. The characters are, as usual, complex and well-written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Who had not done it if you read for background it is lots of fun can you imagine all those trains? the artist colony is seldom used today in mysteries or the writing colonies not to mention dude ranches . it was nice to get him away from the city. It was not deliberate so no anguish of having to hang someone.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Requires an intimate knowledge of train connections between small Scottish towns--gave up after a hundred pages
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What if everyone in the book disliked the murdered victim, and all(or most) of them have no alibis...a rousing tale.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Because of all the fishing and trains sayer seems to add interesting stuff that i skip when re read like bell ringing notes and secret code solving and bus and trains routes but its historical because where are all the trauns and country buses and the vicar riding five miles on oarish visit and heroines walking one or two miles without sneakers another world and did you figure out where vthe electric came from in country houses.? Own generator!