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Flat-Pack Philosophy
     

Flat-Pack Philosophy

5.0 1
by Buzzcocks
 

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While many of their first-wave punk peers have reunited only to bring in some filthy lucre, the 'Cocks are one of the few acts that have hung together while continuing to turn out music that's just as vital as their initial incarnation. Here, Pete Shelley and Steve Diggle -- who share the spotlight more

Overview

While many of their first-wave punk peers have reunited only to bring in some filthy lucre, the 'Cocks are one of the few acts that have hung together while continuing to turn out music that's just as vital as their initial incarnation. Here, Pete Shelley and Steve Diggle -- who share the spotlight more effectively now than they did as angry young men -- veer between re-creating the careening, keening sounds of yore (as on the wry consumerism plaint "Credit") and adopting the more muscle-bound stance of latter-day punk. That's the template they adopt on tracks like "Big Brother Wheels," which boasts a swagger that's reminiscent of second-generation Californians like Pennywise. Heck, on the title track, they even dip a toe or two into waters that might be considered grungy -- an undertone that matches Diggle's guitar work nicely but isn't as kind to the generally pristine harmonies the co-leaders usually purvey. Those, however, are in full effect on "Wish I Never Loved You," a ditty so yearning that you'd never guess the guys responsible for making it that way are on the far side of 50. Throughout the disc -- which packs 14 tunes into less than 40 minutes -- the band seem capable of funneling the fountain of youth right down their collective gullet, making Flat-Pack Philosophy one of the most engaging, energizing listens of the season.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mark Deming
The Buzzcocks have had difficulty living up to the formidable legacy of their past on the studio material they've released since reuniting in 1989, but in the early years of the 21st century they've finally learned to make new records that don't need to stand in the shadows of Singles Going Steady. The darker undertow of 2003's Buzzcocks set it apart from their previous albums, and though 2006's Flat-Pack Philosophy isn't haunted by the same degree of angst as that album, it reflects the same degree of increased maturity that informed Pete Shelley and Steve Diggle's material on that collection. While the Buzzcocks are still trying to figure out the nuts and bolts of love, "Reconciliation," "God, What Have I Done," and "I've Had Enough" speak of the stakes and responsibilities of grown-up relationships rather than the teenage frustration of their salad days, and the larger world has also become a subject of keener interest to them on numbers like "Sell You Everything" and "Credit." Fast and loud is still the Buzzcocks' preferred mode of attack, but though there are hooks galore to be found on Flat-Pack Philosophy, the tempos have eased up a bit so that Diggle's and Shelley's guitar parts have more room to interact with one another, and bassist Tony Barber's production is clean and roomy while giving the melodies plenty of opportunity to show off their muscle. Very few bands made better use of their teenage mood swings than the Buzzcocks, but Flat-Pack Philosophy shows that they have plenty of compelling things to say about their adult lives, too, which is a good thing for a band whose career now spans four decades.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/07/2006
Label:
Cooking Vinyl
UPC:
0711297477221
catalogNumber:
4772
Rank:
151443

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Flat-Pack Philosophy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Chappa_Larcha More than 1 year ago
An amazing album if you like punk rock! All songs are really catchy and well crafted. One of the best is "Reconciliation"!