The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know -- and Men Can't Say

The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know -- and Men Can't Say

by Suzanne Venker
2.8 16

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The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know -- and Men Can't Say 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I tried to keep an open mind when reading this book. I actually do agree with some of the ideas put forth by the authors -- that there are fundamental differences between men and women, for example, or that children tend to benefit from a parent being home -- but unfortunately once the book described Fox News as "fair and balanced," I had a hard time taking it seriously. The authors make many claims that are not backed up by any sort of evidence, such as that "most American women are conservative." At other times, two sides of an argument are presented, and even though the situations are virtually identical, one is described as not deserving of any merit, and the other (that supports their view) as representative of women at large. The book's cited evidence is clearly heavily biased and not the most credible. The authors seek to convince the reader that women were best off as submissive partners who tamed their husbands' sexuality, and that pursuing an education or career is highly detrimental for females. They champion religion over rationalism, and claim that women are happiest and best suited to marry young, stay at home with their ubiquitous children, and learn to depend on a man for everything they may need financially or otherwise not directly related to childrearing. TL;DR: The book's few valid points are overshadowed by its disregard for logic and credible source material. It argues, essentially, that women are better off at home and pregnant than educated and self-sufficient, no matter their background or situation.
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SynisterGrin More than 1 year ago
Great book
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Oh, yes, the 1950s were the Golden Age---NOT. Divorce was common, but alimony wasn't. Even with aneducation, women couldn't get a decent job (Sandra Day O'Connor had alaw degree and they wanted to hire her as a secretary; by the early 70s,I was intervewd for that job with a double master's). Such a wonderful life for women that half of therm were either swallowing Valium or too many martinis. For a reality check, read The Feminine Mystique. And I recall a coversation with an-stewardess Mommy who toldme men needed tomakemore than men because they weresuporting afamily. I pointed out that divorce and widoehood could leave any woman supporting afamily.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a feminst myself I tried to go into this with an open mind. But it was awful. Written by railing conservatives witb a women shaming undertone. Dont read this. Not worth the headache, I see where the book was trying to go but it failed.
lizl25 More than 1 year ago
This book is so good at explaining why the rise of feminism is not truly about empowering women. I think all girls/women should read this. They don't tell you to sit at home and not do anything but they explain what women's God-given roles are and how feminism has ruined many women's/children's lives and perspectives have become warped.
LinyLK More than 1 year ago
This book exposes all the myths the feminist movement has crammed down women's throats these past 40 some odds years.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book comes from no informed opinion, but rather a commentator type who likes to gain attention by ruffling feathers. At least that's what I'm hoping. I just can't believe that any woman with even limited access to history could believe this stuff is true. It's grossly inaccurate. And why are there two different taglines? "What smart women know" vs. "What conservative women know" - That right there proves my point these authors are riding the same wave as a shock-jock. They write about giving up a "posh lifestyle" when most families need two incomes just to pay the mortgage. I'm not sure what world these women are living in, but most of the middle class can't afford the luxury of a stay-at-home mom. Speaking of luxuries, what a luxury it is to be able to WRITE a book, huh ladies? There was a time not long ago that wouldn't have been allowed.
CranialTraveler More than 1 year ago
I felt the author held some harboring grudge over anyone slightly left, and made it clear from the start of the book. It felt very much like the author didn't even investigate on the other point of view. I couldn't stand reading anymore of this blatant ignorance.