FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio

FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio

by Richard Neer
4.2 24

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Overview

FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio by Richard Neer

"It was all so honest, before the end of our collective innocence. Top Forty jocks screamed and yelled and sounded mightier than God on millions of transistor radios. But on FM radio it was all spun out for only you. On a golden web by a master weaver driven by fifty thousand magical watts of crystal clear power . . . before the days of trashy, hedonistic dumbspeak and disposable three-minute ditties . . . in the days where rock lived at many addresses in many cities."
–from FM

As a young man, Richard Neer dreamed of landing a job at WNEW in New York–one of the revolutionary FM stations across the country that were changing the face of radio by rejecting strict formatting and letting disc jockeys play whatever they wanted. He felt that when he got there, he’d have made the big time. Little did he know he’d have shaped rock history as well.

FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio chronicles the birth, growth, and death of free-form rock-and-roll radio through the stories of the movement’s flagship stations. In the late sixties and early seventies–at stations like KSAN in San Francisco, WBCN in Boston, WMMR in Philadelphia, KMET in Los Angeles, WNEW, and others–disc jockeys became the gatekeepers, critics, and gurus of new music. Jocks like Scott Muni, Vin Scelsa, Jonathan Schwartz, and Neer developed loyal followings and had incredible influence on their listeners and on the early careers of artists such as Bruce Springsteen, Genesis, the Cars, and many others.

Full of fascinating firsthand stories, FM documents the commodification of an iconoclastic phenomenon, revealing how counterculture was coopted and consumed by the mainstream. Richard Neer was an eyewitness to, and participant in, this history. FM is the tale of his exhilarating ride.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781588360731
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/18/2001
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 505,159
File size: 487 KB

About the Author

Richard Neer started in radio while attending Adelphi University and pioneered progressive radio on Long Island after graduation. In 1971, he joined the staff of WNEW-FM and worked there as a disc jockey and programmer for over twenty-eight years. In 1986, he became a sports talk-show host at WNEW-AM. He moved to WFAN in July of 1988, where he is currently a weekend personality and pre- and postgame host for New York Giants football. He is the sports editor for Talkers magazine and appears regularly on various syndi-cated radio and television shows. He lives in New Jersey with his wife, Vicky, and their willful golden retriever, Lindsay.

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FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Former WNEW-FM DJ Richard Neer examines the beginning of the progressive radio format in New York during the 1970's. From the closing of the Fillmore East to the death of John Lennon, no other rock station captivated its audience like WNEW-FM. Great behind the scenes stories of Neer, Scott Muni and other jocks from this legendary station. An interesting read for radio fans and rock and rollers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I acquired this book, I figured it would be exclusively about WNEW-FM and its rock radio days,particularly haling back to my experiences as a listner and fan through my junior & high school 1980s. Boy, was I surprised! I feel humbled that I didn't even know Richard Neer had spent such a long and complicated career there! Not only does Richard tell many excellent tales regarding the radio personalities we've heard, loved, and/or reviled, but he paints a historical portrait of FM and rock radio which extends across the entire country, tracing a path which I never knew existed through the music scene, the business side, the political motivations. While I would've greatly enjoyed more depth concerning the personalities with which I grew up, this is a great story of evolution in a very important part of the entertainment world. It is unfortunate that the 'Fall of Rock Radio' had to be included, but it is also good to understand how and why WNEW-FM, and freeform-like programming in general, was destroyed by greed rather than necessarily outliving itself.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I want to give a balanced review but personnally I really liked this book and found it hard to put down. Partly that¿s because it's nostalgic. I can hear the DJ's voices Richard Neer evokes in my head. The sad thing is I can't name off any DJ's name on the radio stations I now flip through on my way to work. If you are looking for a well referenced history of AM and FM radio, or a how to book about running a radio station, you may have to look elsewhere. ¿FM¿ stands on its own merits. It is an insightful and informative professional memoir. The index helps as ¿FM¿ is made up of the behind the scenes names as well as the famous rock stars and DJs. Certain stories may seem too brief while others do not have a big finish that the author appeared to be building up to, but most of the stories are effortless and familiar. Readers may also see similarities with there own careers. Richard Neer has also presented an indictment of management solely by the numbers, in this case ratings.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are of a certain age and grew up in America, there's a good chance that you spent many hours listening to FM radio. If like me you lived in the NY area you would have listened to WNEW-FM and developed an intense (one-sided) bond with the announcers -- people like Rosko, Scott Muni, and Jonathan Schwartz -- and felt that you were the acme of cool for doing so. You would listen every chance you could -- while relaxing, studying, driving, eating -- and even made time to listen if a certain DJ was broadcasting on a given night. Free-form FM radio seemed great. To live through its gradual erosion an ultimate disappearance over the last 20 years was painful, and a lesson in how the free market can create something of rare beauty but then turn and destroy it. Richard Neer was a slight latecomer to the rise of WNEW-FM but was an integral part of its glory years (and a superb DJ) who was there for the inexorable fall of that station and the whole notion of free-form radio. FM: The Rise and Fall of Rock Radio tells that story, centering on WNEW-FM but giving some space to 'sister stations' around the country. Neer provides many details and anecdotes that devoted, nostalgic fans will devour -- such as the all-nighter he pulled to show up an arrogant and condescending Jonathan Schwartz. Early on he briefly conveys the special feeling of the FM radio of 25 to 30 years ago -- the intimacy, the sense that that voice coming out of the box was especially for you. And then the gradual closing in of market forces that have left us with pre-programmed music radio or insufferable shock jocks. Unfortunately Neer is overly preoccupied with personalities and rarely steps back to convey a sense of the larger picture. I think that anyone not already fascinated by the topic will wonder what all the fuss was about. Changes in the country as a whole and popular culture specifically are discussed in passing, if at all. Some more explication of why WNEW-FM and free-form radio in general seemed so great at the time would have been preferable. And how about an accompanying CD to hear Rosko welcome you, one last time, to 'the hippest of all trips'? Stylistically, FM is often awkward. To give other geographical areas their due, and to weave a story of different people and career paths, the chronology can become confusing. Neer's phrasing can be clumsy, such as his description of an early 1960's radio management technique as being 'time-honored'. Yeah, maybe by now, but surely not back then when it was invented. On the other hand, if you've been a fan of his as a music jock and/or a sports announcer (on WFAN), you may enjoy hearing Neer's voice in the book. Which is the main limitation of FM -- if you're an old radio fan like me chances are you'll love it. If not you may not get past the first chapter. Shortly before its ultimate demise as a music station, WNEW-FM broadcast a tape of its from a day in 1972 (25 years earlier), complete with commercials, DJ raps, and music. Listening to it I thought, hey, it wasn't just nostalgia. That really *was* great.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Age:16 <br> Hair color:silver with black fox ears on her head <br> Eye color:same as fox form <br> Skin color:pale <br> Wears:all silver fur clothes <br> Fox form: at lmj res 2 <br> <br>
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Waits for a master
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
U both r idiots
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sore looser. He said
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It came in and punched pat in the face
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
&heart &crown &heart &<3
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
&hearts &crown
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I didnt lose now be friends
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Follows
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The white she kitten pads in sadly and then looks around and sees a window that looked open and she ran headfirst into the window and the glass broke and she fell down a few stories and landed on all four paws. She blacks out and dowsnt wakes up
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Walks out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Zach
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Eats the fox
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Is pushed in. "Use my body." She whimpered. (MIDNIGHT IS LOCKED OUT OF RESULT 1)
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My name is aly. Om here to be a slve
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She padded in and growled. "Shecats arent meant to be played with or direspected." She punched him across the fae and chained his legs and arms to the wall and she slit his throat and cut open his stomach, grinning.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He whips her and before he chained her he pulled he close she giggled imma be using you the most he was mad so he'pushed' her with each and every threast
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I want to be a slave