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For Every Sin
     

For Every Sin

by Aharon Appelfeld, Jeffrey M. Green (Translator)
 

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By one of Isreal's preeminent authors, For Every Sin is a haunting story of a Holocaust survivor's odyssey across Europe and his struggle to find redemption in the aftermath of his experience.

Overview

By one of Isreal's preeminent authors, For Every Sin is a haunting story of a Holocaust survivor's odyssey across Europe and his struggle to find redemption in the aftermath of his experience.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
As in Appelfeld's earlier novels of alienation set during and after the Holocaust ( Badenheim 1939 ; To the Land of the Cattails ), this narrative portrays a man cruelly deprived of will and emotional clarity. Theo, plodding home across Europe after four years in the death camps, is stunned and lifeless, a condition reflected in Appelfeld's deliberately unadorned prose. Remote memories propel Theo toward Baden-bei-Wein--his mother, the chapels they once visited, the cafes and art galleries--and send him scuttling past clusters of refugees who beseech him to stop. He notices neither cold nor hunger, but, yearning for coffee and cigarettes, finally pauses when they are offered and finds himself not many miles from where he began. Like his thoughts, his feet have traveled in circles, pursued by visions he cannot escape. Eventually he understands that he must join those other refugees who ``stretch out their hands . . . to the miserable brethren scattered on the deserted roads.'' At the end of this slim narrative, Theo has tentatively rejoined the company of the survivors, who ``can't bring the dead back to life . . . but can at least say `we're together.' '' (May)
Library Journal
Though for survivors of the Holocaust the desire to forget must be strong, most have come to recognize the need never to forget and to conduct their lives accordingly. This conflict between desire and need is the focus of Appelfeld's latest work. Theo Braun, a young survivor of the camps, is determined to leave his experience behind, to isolate himself from his fellow refugees and return on foot to his home near Vienna. Whatever his intentions, he finds himself drawn, almost mothlike, back to the campfires, coffee, and companionship of other survivors. As he wrestles with his conflicting feelings, he slowly comes to realize that returning ``home'' is impossible and that as a survivor he is under an obligation to help his ``miserable brethren,'' to ``do as much good as possible.'' Succinct and affecting; essential for collections of serious fiction.-- David W. Henderson, Eckerd Coll. Lib., St. Petersburg, Fla.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781555843182
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
05/10/1989
Pages:
176

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Irving Howe
"Aharon Appelfeld is one of the best novelist alive." -- Irving Howe

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