The Foreign Correspondent

The Foreign Correspondent

by Alan Furst
3.1 14

Paperback(Large Print Edition)

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Overview

The Foreign Correspondent by Alan Furst

From Alan Furst, whom The New York Times calls “America’s preeminent spy novelist,” comes an epic story of romantic love, love of country, and love of freedom–the story of a secret war fought in elegant hotel bars and first-class railway cars, in the mountains of Spain and the backstreets of Berlin. It is an inspiring, thrilling saga of everyday people forced by their hearts’ passion to fight in the war against tyranny.

By 1938, hundreds of Italian intellectuals, lawyers and journalists, university professors and scientists had escaped Mussolini’s fascist government and taken refuge in Paris. There, amid the struggles of émigré life, they founded an Italian resistance, with an underground press that smuggled news and encouragement back to Italy. Fighting fascism with typewriters, they produced 512 clandestine newspapers. The Foreign Correspondent is their story.

Paris, a winter night in 1938: a murder/suicide at a discreet lovers’ hotel. But this is no romantic traged–it is the work of the OVRA, Mussolini’s fascist secret police, and is meant to eliminate the editor of Liberazione, a clandestine émigré newspaper. Carlo Weisz, who has fled from Trieste and secured a job as a foreign correspondent with the Reuters bureau, becomes the new editor.
Weisz is, at that moment, in Spain, reporting on the last campaign of the Spanish civil war. But as soon as he returns to Paris, he is pursued by the French Sûreté, by agents of the OVRA, and by officers of the British Secret Intelligence Service. In the desperate politics of Europe on the edge of war, a foreign correspondent is a pawn, worth surveillance, or blackmail, or murder.

The Foreign Correspondent is the story of Carlo Weisz and a handful of antifascists: the army officer known as “Colonel Ferrara,” who fights for a lost cause in Spain; Arturo Salamone, the shrewd leader of a resistance group in Paris; and Christa von Schirren, the woman who becomes the love of Weisz’s life, herself involved in a doomed resistance underground in Berlin.

The Foreign Correspondent is Alan Furst at his absolute best–taut and powerful, enigmatic and romantic, with sharp, seductive writing that takes the reader through darkness and intrigue to a spectacular denouement.

From the Hardcover edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781594131912
Publisher: Large Print Distribution
Publication date: 06/08/2007
Edition description: Large Print Edition
Pages: 447
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Alan Furst is widely recognized as the master of the historical spy novel. He is the author of Night Soldiers, Dark Star, The Polish Officer, The World at Night, Red Gold, Kingdom of Shadows, Blood of Victory, and Dark Voyage. Born in New York, he has lived for long periods in France, especially Paris. He now lives on Long Island, New York. Visit the author’s website at www.alanfurst.net.

From the Hardcover edition.

Hometown:

Sag Harbor, New York

Place of Birth:

New York, New York

Education:

B.A., Oberlin College

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3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you have not read Furst's previous books, especially The Polish Officer, The World at Night, Red Gold and Kingdom of Shadows you probably will not care much for The Foreign Correspondant. Why? Because The Foregign Correspondant revists the lives of many of the characters who appeared in those stories, albiet in brief snippits. I suspect this is why, in part, many readers did not like this story. Granted, the storyline is short on action. However, I enjoyed the dialogue between the characters. I also enjoyed learning more about the characters lives that Furst introduced in his previous stories. I also found the story suspenseful. Furst's talent, in my opinion, lies in his ability to transport the reader back in time. He excells at creating atmosphere and mood. Reading his stories, I always feel like a voyeur, getting brief glimpses into the lives of other interesting people.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As ever, I enjoyed the easy read - however this time I felt suspiciously set up for a sequel. Most of Furst 's previous novels went full circle. I usually felt somewhat satisfied at the conclusion. I felt this one left too many loose ends. Still enjoyable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I agree with Vance--what was the point of this book? There's no tension, you never really felt anyone was in danger, and it's hard to get excited about someone buying printing presses on the black market. Call this one 'The Spy Who Bored Me.'
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of the most boring, plotless pieces of fluff I've ever read. If it were intended to be a sort of tongue-in-cheek, cheesy kind of homage to pulp fiction, it might have worked on some level. Instead, publishers hail Furst as *the* master of the historical spy novel. Well, you might think that if you've never read LeCarre, Ludlum, etc. This book is all stereotypical atmosphere. 'Ze Freench! Zey are so, how shall I say, Romanteeec! Pass me a Gitanne!' Oh, brother. It's just silly. You could write a summary of this novel on the back of a cocktail napkin. Finally, I wish someone would tell Furst that sentence fragments and comma splices are fine if you use them for effect or to reflect some character's thought process. Using them randomly within plot narrative is distracting and causes one to wonder whether the author even understands the purpose of proper punctuation.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
all furst novels are the same:great atmosphere, excellent prose, way too many characters, the story is all over the place, and the ending falls apart. i believe he tries to offer his stories as they would happen in real life: the hero meets many people, and many things happen. but this is not drama, and it would take genius to pull it off. alan furst: condense your characters--the female journalist, mccarthy, and elena, from the underground paper, become one character. lose the paris girlfriend, expand the berlin girlfriend. lose the guy in the park in berlin--it goes nowhere. lose the rebel writing the book. bring the bad guy you open the story with back for more than just one paragraph. in short--find a narrative drive and stay on spine. and cut the majority of your characters so the reader can become familiar with the people on the page. in this short novel, there's probably 70 speaking parts, and half the scenes don't work or aren't necessary. but still, furst is such a good writer, and can conjure europe before the second world war, that i somewhat like and finish his books. i just wish i could edit them.