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Forward Drive: The Race to Build
     

Forward Drive: The Race to Build "Clean" Cars for the Future

by Jim Motavalli
 

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As alternative-fuel cars from major auto makers enter the U.S. market - promising far better performance and range than the disappointing electric vehicles (EVs) of past decades - "clean" cars are no longer being relegated to side-show status; they're about to take center stage.
Forward Drive presents the fascinating story of the race to build the cars of

Overview

As alternative-fuel cars from major auto makers enter the U.S. market - promising far better performance and range than the disappointing electric vehicles (EVs) of past decades - "clean" cars are no longer being relegated to side-show status; they're about to take center stage.
Forward Drive presents the fascinating story of the race to build the cars of the future - ones that can help to address the problems that have accompanied the rise and spread of traditional gas-powered cars. The book traces the history of automobile development, including early attempts to create practical electric vehicles, and explores new technologies for "clean" cars, especially hybrid (gas/electric) drives and hydrogen fuel cells.
In his research, Motavalli conducted extensive interviews with "early adopters" of alternative vehicles, energy researchers, and key auto-industry figures, giving us a clear picture of how U.S. and foreign auto makers are getting serious about "clean" cars. With his passion for automobiles and knowledge of their history and workings, he presents an insightful, informative, and highly readable book about these revolutionary cars.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Despite Motavalli's position as editor of E: The Environmental Magazine, this is not a polemic describing the horrors of gasoline-powered cars. To be sure, Motavalli is firmly in favor of moving toward more fuel-efficient, less-polluting autos, but he is pragmatic enough to realize that such a change is not going to occur at the snap of some environmentalist's fingers. In his cogently written, well-researched account, Motavalli argues that market forces are ushering the U.S. into a clean-car era. Improvements in technology involving batteries and fuel cells, along with global warming, dwindling oil reserves and government mandates such as that of California's Air Resources Board, which calls for 10% of an automaker's fleet to be zero-emission by 2003, are all merging to create a market for electronic cars. But the most important factor driving increased domestic research into non-internal combustion engines (hybrid cars that combine gasoline with alternative power sources as well as hydrogen-propelled cars) is the fear that Detroit could be blindsided by the introduction of clean cars by foreign manufacturers, which American car makers believe could do the same damage to their market share as Toyota and Honda did when they began selling fuel-efficient autos a few decades ago. While Motavalli addresses environmental issues, his straightforward account is more likely to appeal to car enthusiasts who want the inside track on the status of electronic vehicles. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578050352
Publisher:
Sierra Club Books
Publication date:
03/28/2000
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
5.82(w) x 8.42(h) x 0.94(d)

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