Four British Fantasists: Place and Culture in the Children's Fantasies of Penelope Lively, Alan Garner, Diana Wynne Jones, and Susan Cooper

Four British Fantasists: Place and Culture in the Children's Fantasies of Penelope Lively, Alan Garner, Diana Wynne Jones, and Susan Cooper

by Charles Butler

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780810852426
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date: 04/25/2006
Pages: 322
Product dimensions: 5.72(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.95(d)

About the Author

Charles Butler teaches English Literature at the University of the West of England.

Table of Contents

Part 1 Acknowledgments Chapter 2 1. Contexts and Connections Chapter 3 2. Applied Archeology Chapter 4 3. Longing and Belonging Chapter 5 4. Myth and Magic Chapter 6 5. Conclusion: Writing for Children? Part 7 Bibliography Part 8 Index Part 9 About the Author

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Four British Fantasists: Place and Culture in the Children's Fantasies of Penelope Lively, Alan Garner, Diana Wynne Jones, and Susan Cooper 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
souloftherose on LibraryThing 20 days ago
As the title suggests, this book looks at the works of four British children¿s fantasy authors: Penelope Lively, Alan Garner, Diana Wynne Jones and Susan Cooper. These writers contributed to the `second Golden Age¿ of children¿s literature in Britain during the 1960s and 1970s. Obviously there were other British children¿s authors writing during this period (such as Joan Aiken) who are not covered in this book so why has Butler chosen these four? The first section of this book looks at the biographic similarities between the four authors (all four were children during WWII and all attended Oxford University in the early 1950s when C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien were lecturers there). Butler explores the influence Lewis and Tolkien may have had on these four authors and then continues to look at other influences from the war and the culture in Britain itself. I found it particularly interesting to see the importance these authors placed in the land itself compared to the urban fantasies of Neil Gaiman and other later writers.I think the more books you¿ve read by these four authors, the more you will appreciate this book, but it¿s still a very enjoyable read even if you haven¿t read the complete works although it may well mean that you end up adding a large number of books to your TBR pile!I found the majority of this book readable and accessible for someone who has not read much literary criticism before. The last chapter (Conclusion: Writing for Children?) referred to other studies of the four authors and children¿s literature in general and I found a lot of this discussion rather dry.