Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding (Royal Spyness Series #12)

Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding (Royal Spyness Series #12)

by Rhys Bowen

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780425283523
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/07/2018
Series: Royal Spyness Series , #12
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 43,950
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.30(d)

About the Author

Rhys Bowen, a New York Times bestselling author, has been nominated for every major award in mystery writing, including the Edgar®, and has won many, including both the Agatha and Anthony awards. She is the author of the Royal Spyness Mysteries, set in 1930s London, the Molly Murphy Mysteries, set in turn-of-the-century New York, and the Constable Evans Mysteries, set in Wales. She was born in England and now divides her time between Northern California and Arizona.

Read an Excerpt

***This excerpt is from an advance uncorrected copy proof***
Chapter 1

Wednesday, June 12, 1935

16 Eaton Square, London, S.W.1

Things are actually going smoothly for once. I can’t believe it. Here I am, staying at the house of Polish princess Zamanska (known to her friends as Zou Zou) while Darcy is away and I prepare for my wedding. I didn’t think I’d ever write those words, certainly not about someone as wonderful as Darcy. It seems only yesterday that I fled from Castle Rannoch and arrived alone in London, penniless and without a friend in the world. But it’s actually going to happen in a few weeks’ time. Golly. Mrs. Darcy O’Mara. As Jane Bennet would say, “How shall I bear so much happiness?”

I was standing at my window on the top floor of Princess Zamanska’s lovely Georgian house on Eaton Square (which, in case you don’t know, is one of the poshest addresses in London). It was another glorious summer day. We had been blessed with a long dry spell, so unusual in English summers. In fact my whole spring so far had been a delight, ever since I returned from lending support to my friend Belinda in Italy. In May there had been the king’s Silver Jubilee, with a triumphant procession to St. Paul’s Cathedral, the king and queen riding in an open landau. I had been part of the congregation at St. Paul’s and it was a moving experience.

This afternoon I had been going through my clothes and seeing which ones might be good enough to take into my future life as Mrs. Darcy O’Mara. Yes, I know, I’m going to be an ordinary missus, rather a step down for a cousin to the king, but Darcy is actually an honorable, the son of a lord, and because I’m the daughter of a duke people will still have to address me as Lady Georgiana—unless they habitually forget like my maid, Queenie!

I stared at the items hanging in a rather grand French wardrobe and winced. Aging tweed skirt, a couple of white blouses, cotton frocks made for me by the gamekeeper’s wife at home in Scotland. Hardly haute couture! Actually it wasn’t as if we were going to live anywhere grand. Darcy’s father, Lord Kilhenny, had made it clear he wanted us to consider Kilhenny Castle our home, and that was very nice, but it wasn’t the sort of place you’d want to spend the whole year. (Too cold and dreary, like Castle Rannoch, for my taste!) Also there were times when Darcy needed to be in London for his work—which is rather hush-hush.

But occasionally we did move in quite grand circles, ranging from an invitation to Buckingham Palace to Princess Zou Zou’s international playboy set (which included my cousin the Prince of Wales and his lady friend from America). I was constantly reminded that my wardrobe was sadly lacking when compared to every other lady’s Paris models. Still there was hope on the horizon in that department too. My mother, the former duchess and now about to marry a very rich German, had promised that she would come to London and we’d shop for a trousseau. She was very grateful to me for saving her from an embarrassing situation in Italy. I didn’t dare count on this, as my mother was the most fickle of creatures and I hadn’t been able to count on her since she bolted from my father and me when I was only two. Still, this time I really had saved her bacon, so she jolly well should be grateful enough to pay for some decent clothes for me!

I decided that if Mummy came through, I might abandon most of my schoolgirlish and boring wardrobe and become a new and fashionable woman. I’d certainly turned some heads in a borrowed backless dress in Italy. Svelte and sexy, that’s what I would become. My picture in the Tatler: Lady Georgiana, dressed in Chanel at Ascot . . . Lady Georgiana, looking rakish at opening day at Cowes . . . I broke off, grinning at this absurdity. My husband-to-be was as penniless as I was.

The square below basked in afternoon quiet. The breeze that came in through the window was warm and scented with the sweet smell of honeysuckle and roses. A thrush was singing madly in the garden at the center of the square. A nanny in a smart uniform was pushing a very grand pram. Next year, I thought . . . but I’d want to push my own pram. In any case we probably couldn’t afford a nanny.

I had just turned away from the window when I heard the doorbell jangle below. Zou Zou wasn’t actually in residence at the moment, having flown over to Paris in her little two-seater plane to do some shopping. I leaned out as far as I dared but there was a porch over the front door and I could see nothing. I stood, listening and wondering who might have come to call. Obviously someone who didn’t know Zou Zou was away. Then I heard the light tap of feet coming up the stairs, a knock on my door. I opened it to see Clotilde, the princess’s maid.

“My lady, zere is a visitor for you,” she said. (Her French accent was still rather strong.)

“Who is it?” I asked. For a moment I had a wild hope that Darcy had returned earlier than expected. But then he wouldn’t be a nameless visitor. He’d have bounded straight in past Clotilde and up the stairs.

“A lady,” Clotilde said. “She did not ’and me ’er card. She merely says, ‘I understand you ’ave Lady Georgiana Rannoch staying ’ere at zee moment. I wish to speak wiz ’er.’”

Oh dear. That sounded serious. I glanced in the mirror to see if I looked presentable. Not very. It was a hot day and my cotton frock was crumpled. Clotilde must have noticed this because she said, “I recently washed and pressed your green silk, my lady. I will tell zee visitor zat you will be down shortly.”

“Thank you, Clotilde,” I said. “And please see that my visitor is offered tea or lemonade or whatever she wishes.”

“Of course, my lady.” Clotilde was a perfect maid: she always knew the right thing to do on any occasion, from turning a blind eye when the princess invited a male friend up to see her etchings to invisibly mending holes in velvet burned by my maid, Queenie, who was about as un-perfect as one could imagine. But Queenie, the disaster-maid, was not with me at the moment. She was still with Darcy’s relatives in Ireland, where she was learning to be an assistant cook. I couldn’t decide whether I should summon her back when we moved into a place of our own. The problem was that efficient maids cost money and of that we had little. Maybe I could ask Mummy to supply me with a maid as a wedding present. But as we had both found out, too-perfect maids aren’t always desirable!

Hastily I scrambled into my green silk dress, brushed my hair and went downstairs trying to look cool, calm and collected.

“Zee visitor is in zee small sitting room, my lady,” Clotilde said. I pushed open the door. My visitor was sitting in a chair by the window with a cup of tea in her hand. She looked up, frowning, as I entered.

“Ah, there you are, Georgiana. I wondered where on earth you had got to,” she said. “We hadn’t heard from you in ages. We thought you might still be in Switzerland but Binky suggested you might be staying with that foreign princess woman, and he was right, clever old thing.”

My heart sank. It was my sister-in-law Hilda, Duchess of Rannoch, usually known as Fig.

“Hello, Fig,” I said as pleasantly as I could as I pulled up a chair beside her. “What a surprise. How lovely to see you. I thought you’d be up in Scotland for the summer. That’s why I didn’t come to call.”

Her scowl deepened. “We were but we came down for a doctor’s appointment. It makes a change from bloody Scotland, where it has rained incessantly this spring. And Binky has taken up golf. Does nothing but hit a stupid little ball over miles of heather into little holes. What a waste of time.”

“A doctor’s appointment?” I said the words cautiously. “You’re both in good health, I hope? Oh, don’t tell me it’s another baby on the way?”

“God forbid,” she said, rolling her eyes. “No, I told Binky we have the heir and he can do without the spare. As if anyone would want to inherit that cold and drafty white elephant that is Castle Rannoch.”

“So it’s just a routine check?” I asked.

“Actually it’s Binky’s toenails,” she said, with supreme distaste in her voice. “He has ingrown toenails and they are spoiling his golf game. Apparently it requires a small operation to make them right again and he thought it had better be done in London, just to be on the safe side. And I said if I was being dragged to London for his toenails the very least he could do was to take me to Ascot for once. We have so little opportunity to dress up at home. I might buy a new hat.”

“How jolly,” I said. “Shall you be going on opening day? I might see you there.”

“You are going to Ascot?” She sounded quite vexed, as if I’d arranged this deliberately to spite her. “On opening day?”

“Yes, the queen invited me to join her party.”

“You’re going on opening day with the queen?” Fig really did wince now. She had never forgiven me that Queen Mary had actually become quite fond of me and invited me regularly to the palace—also that I was of royal blood and she wasn’t. To smooth this over I added, “I’m going to borrow one of Zou Zou’s hats. She has some quite outrageous ones.”

Fig frowned as she looked at the silk dress. “That dress you are wearing looks rather chic. Did you borrow that from your foreign princess?”

I was dying to say, “What? This old thing?” but I couldn’t pull it off without grinning. “It came from my mother,” I said. “It was one of her few castoffs that actually fit me. On her it came to her ankles and just hung loosely. On me it’s short and formfitting, but at least it’s silk.”

“One thing I can say for your mother, she does have good taste in clothes.”

She took a sip of tea before adding, “Of course the same thing can’t be said for men. Who is her particular beau at the moment, dare one ask? A polo player? A racing driver? A Texas oilman?”

“They are all in the past,” I said. “It’s still Max von Strohheim, the German industrialist. I think you’ve met him. He’s nice. She’s been with him for a couple of years now, and what’s more, they are planning to marry next month. Big wedding in Berlin. I’m going to be a maid of honor.”

“Good God,” Fig said. “It seems that everybody in the world is getting married this summer, including you, one gathers. One saw the engagement announcement in the Times. So it’s actually about this wedding that I am here. We haven’t yet received an invitation. . . .”

“That’s because the final details have not been put into place yet, Fig. We only just heard that I had been given permission to withdraw from the royal line of succession. Until that we couldn’t go ahead. We’ve chosen the date, July 27, and we just have to have invitations printed and mailed.”

“That was a big step to take, Georgiana,” Fig said. “One does not reject one’s place in society and one’s obligations lightly. I’m sure Binky would never have renounced his place in the line of succession to marry me.”

I tried to keep a straight face. I didn’t think that any man in his right mind would have renounced anything to marry Fig. I’m not normally so uncharitable, but Fig has been utterly beastly to me since she came to live at Castle Rannoch, making it plain that I was no longer welcome at my childhood home.

“I was only thirty-fifth in line, Fig. Your children would be on the throne before me if a meteor strike or plague wiped out the rest of the royal family.”

“That’s true, but all the same . . .” Fig took another sip of her tea, then put down the cup and saucer with a clatter on the little glass-topped table.

“I intended to marry Darcy whatever happened,” I said. “I would have run off to Argentina if Parliament had said no.”

“So are we to expect that you will be married from the family seat in Scotland?”

“Castle Rannoch? Good heavens no,” I said, rather more emphatically than I had meant. Then I remembered it was her home and she was stuck there for most of the year, so I added, “I do want my friends to attend my wedding, and Castle Rannoch is in the middle of nowhere, isn’t it? Besides, they’d all have to stay at the castle. You’d have to entertain them, Fig. And think of all the Rannoch family members—those hairy cousins with the big appetites. It would cost a pretty penny.”

I knew I had hit a nerve there. Fig is the stingiest person I have ever met. I saw her face twitch. “Of course you are not wrong there,” she said. Then she paused. “I mean, how would they all get to Castle Rannoch? There is no bus or train.”

“My point exactly,” I said. “And of course there is no Catholic church within miles.”

Her eyes blinked up and down rapidly now. “A Catholic church? You are planning to marry in a Catholic church?”

“That’s because I’m marrying a Catholic, Fig.”

“You’re not planning to convert, are you?” She sounded as if I’d just said that I was planning to marry a pygmy and become a cannibal.

“I haven’t decided yet. I’m supposed to be taking instruction from a priest in London—to let me know what I’m getting into. I have to promise to bring up the children as Catholics.”

She actually reached out a hand and laid it over mine. “Oh, Georgie. Are you sure you want to go through with this? I mean . . .”

“Fig, let’s get this straight,” I said, still trying to remain calm. “I love Darcy. I want to marry him. His religion means something to him, whereas mine means going to church occasionally because it is expected of me.”

“You couldn’t have a proper Church of England ceremony and just a Catholic blessing at the end?” she suggested.

“Then it wouldn’t be a sacrament.”

“A what?”

“A holy wedding in the eyes of the church. I wouldn’t be considered properly married. But I really don’t mind where we marry as long as we do marry.”

“So where is this ceremony to take place? In London?”

“Yes, I think so. That way it’s easy for Mummy and Max and other friends to come from the Continent. Darcy worships at something called the Farm Street Church when he’s in town, so I wouldn’t mind holding it there.”

“The Farm Street?” Fig’s eyebrows rose in astonishment. “Where in heaven’s name is that?”

I did smile now. “On Farm Street in Mayfair, actually. That’s how they always refer to it. Its real name is the Church of the Immaculate Conception or something terribly Roman like that. It’s where posh Catholics attend church in London.”

“Are there any posh Catholics?” she demanded, looking down her nose at me.

“Well, yes. There’s the pope for one. And the Duke of Norfolk. The premier duke in the peerage of England, therefore one rung above you, Fig. His family is Catholic. And of course Princess Zou Zou. You can’t get much posher than a princess.”

“A Polish princess, Georgie. In countries like that they hand out titles like certificates on sports day at school. And she is only a princess because one presumes she married a prince.”

“You’re right. She was a mere countess before.” I grinned. “Anyway, take it from me that there are enough posh Catholics to fill a church.”

“And you will be staying with this princess until your wedding? You will be married from her house? What about the reception?”

I took a deep breath. “Actually, Fig, I’d really like to be married from our London house, if you and Binky would be willing to come down for the wedding. And I’d like Binky to give me away.”

She shifted uncomfortably. “I don’t know what he’ll say about walking you down the aisle in a Roman Catholic place of worship, Georgiana. But he is very fond of you and we know how softhearted he is, so I expect he’ll agree.” She paused, then could hardly bring herself to say, “And I suppose you expect us to fund the wedding?”

“Mummy is providing my trousseau and Belinda is making my wedding dress,” I said. “I’m sure Zou Zou would be happy to provide the wedding breakfast here, but it would be nice if it could be at my family’s London house. Nothing too fancy, of course. Champagne, a cake and a few nibbles. You and Binky could manage that, couldn’t you?”

She had gone quite pink. “Yes, I suppose we could,” she agreed. Then she wagged a finger at me, looking almost animated. “Binky can wear his kilt and Podge can be a page boy and I wonder if Addy is old enough to be a little bridesmaid?”

I could see her warming to it by the minute.

“Binky looks spiffing in his kilt,” I said, encouraging her.

“And bagpipes,” she added. “You know how Binky loves his bagpipes. We’ll bring down old Mr. McTavish.”

“Oh golly,” I said. I know the sound of bagpipes should be in my blood, but I can’t stand them, having been woken by them at dawn on regular occasions. “Do we really have to have bagpipes?”

“A Rannoch wedding with no bagpipes?” She sounded shocked. “It simply isn’t done, Georgiana. Binky would insist if you want him to give you away.”

I decided that bagpipes for five minutes at the end of my wedding ceremony was a small price to pay for keeping my brother and his wife happy.

“Of course,” I said, giving her a winning smile. “Definitely bagpipes.”

(Continues…)



Excerpted from "Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding"
by .
Copyright © 2018 Rhys Bowen.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding (Royal Spyness Series #12) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This story has been light and funny talked about life and love and highlighted a lot of social differences. I am not sure how these characters will hurl into the war. Right now the series stands at goals achieved family together and happiness at the table. It will be interesting to see where the author can take them next.
Anonymous 5 months ago
Just+the+thing+to+cozy+up+with+when+you+just+want+to+relax+and+cuddle+up+with+a+nice+blankie.%0A%0A
Anonymous 7 months ago
Fun and exciting mystery!
Anonymous 10 months ago
London - 1935 Lady Georgiana Rannoch is soon (finally) to marry Darcy O’Mara. She is the daughter of a duke and cousin to the king. Darcy’s father, Lord Kilhenny, wants them to live at Castle Kilhenny in Scotland after they marry. It’s a bit cold and dreary there and Darcy will need to spend most of his time in London for his job about which no one is allowed to speak. Her mother left her father when Georgiana was young. Thus, she has had to live by her wits and the money she has been able to earn helping out the royal family. Marrying Darcy means she must withdraw from the royal line of succession where she is now at number 39. Knowing they have limited funds, Georgiana and Darcy are worried about where they can live after they marry. But Georgiana’s godfather, who is now out of the country climbing mountains, offers them Eynsleigh, his home in Sussex. As she is his heir, it will all be hers one day. Another reason he wants them to live there is because he suspects things are not right at Eynsleigh and he wants her to check it out. At Eynsleigh, Georgiana definitely finds things not up to par along with a surly staff. She puts her training to work to get the place back to normal - if she can figure out what normal is. I have read all the books of this series and loved each of them. Such a clever and fun mystery grouping. It’s a clean, humorous, and very informative series. I wish I could have read this book via NetGalley when it first came out, but the publisher appears to have boycotted my requests because I do not have a blog. Such a shame for the publisher to deny a request from a prolific reviewer. Therefore, I borrowed this book from my local library.
Anonymous 11 months ago
Wonderful+so+happy+there+finally+married%21
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story grabs from the start and keeps you at full attention. Well worth waiting for. Just love the two of them together at last
auditor2 More than 1 year ago
In the days leading up to her wedding to Darcy O'Mara, Lady Georgiana Rannoch takes on the responsibilities of a grand estate, but proving she can run a household just may be the death of her. As she prepares for her wedding, she also must find a place to live. House hunting turns out to be a pretty grim affair. Just as they start to lose hope, her globetrotting godfather offers them his fully staffed country estate. She heads to Eynsleigh alone, only to have her hopes dashed. The grounds are in disarray and the small staff is suspiciously incompetent. Something rotten is afoot. This was a truly fun book with some really unsavory characters. And a lot of twists and turns before the reader gets to the end and finds out just what is happening in the estate. Georgiana is one of my favorite characters. She can truly get herself into so many interesting situations barely escaping with her life in some instances. And in this book, her mother also drops in to take up residence. She too is a very colorful character. But I don't know if I will like it that Georgiana has to give her title. It was very useful to her at times. I did enjoy guessing who would be the next person requiring a funeral. And I cannot reveal whether the wedding actually happened. That would be totally unfair. But reading and guessing was what made this book such fun. I received a copy of this book in exchange for a review.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this series and look forward to more soon!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Omg Talk about a mix of mystery & romance! Loved it from cover to cover. Had a hard time putting it down. Can’t wait for the next one!
BeagleGirl123 More than 1 year ago
I love, love, love Lady Georgie, and Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding was a delightful addition (the 12th installment) to the series! Lady Georgie's wedding to Darcy O'Mara is imminent, and in addition to the normal trials of any bride - the dress, the guests, househunting - Georgie has to deal with not one, not two, not three, but four deaths throughout the story! It's a good thing her godfather has solved one of her problems by notifying her that she and Darcy are able to live at his country estate, Eynsleigh....or is it?!? 5 stars to this laugh out loud mystery from Rhys Bowen!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Please don’t let this be the final episode!
Carstairs38 More than 1 year ago
Lady Georgianna, Georgie to her friends, is finally planning her wedding to Darcy O’Mara. However, before they get married, they need to figure out where they are going to live. The answer comes from an unlikely place, and soon Georgie is out to the country to get their new home ready for them. She isn’t surprised when she arrives to find the house is running on a minimal staff, but the staff that is there is extremely surprising. Something is definitely up, but can Georgie figure out what is going on? Will she finally get married? As is typical for the series, the book started off a little slowly for me, giving us updates on the various people in Georgie’s life and talking about the wedding plans. There was also a recycled sub-plot in this section that annoyed me. However, once the action moves to Georgie’s potential new house, things really picked up. I was intrigued by what she was facing and couldn’t wait to see how it all was resolved. There is some great character growth for Georgie and another series regular here; overall, the cast is great like always. I was very satisfied with how this book ended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fun easy read with enough twists to keep it interesting. I have enjoyed all the books in this series and can’t wait for more
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Another great addition to the Her Royal Spyness series. The cast of characters--Georgie and Darcy, Binky and Fig, Grandad, Georgie's mother, Belinda, and of course Queenie, make the book a true winner. As Georgie and Darcy's wedding draws near, things do not go smoothly, as is usually the case when Georgie is involved. Is someone trying to kill her, or is she imagining things? I particularly liked seeing the new closeness between Georgie and her mother. Looking forward to more in this series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderful!
dibbylodd More than 1 year ago
This is another fine addition to the series. Lady Georgie is really coming into her own! She is faced with some real challenges, but finds the strength to deal with them. Sadly, she is still shown as seriously insecure at the beginning. Darcy, as usual, is missing until the last critical moment. The biggest surprise is Queenie! What an amazing development in her! All in all, a great delight.
Sailim More than 1 year ago
Rhys Bowen once again demonstrates why she is an award winning author. Fans of Georgie are going to love the newest adventure as she plans for her marriage to Darcy. In her typical fashion, Lady Georgiana innocently goes about life as an impoverished heir to the throne – albeit 36th in line. The search for a home for the soon-to-be newlyweds meets a giant bump in the road when her benefactor makes the offer of his home, a large country estate. Seems a great gift until her arrival at the estate. The house and gardens are a mess; the house, sparse; the servants hopeless! In her usual fashion Georgie stumbles on a mystery which nearly proves fatal! With the aid of her usual companions – her Grandfather, mother, Queenie, Belinda and Darcy – Georgie carries on, providing an entertaining romp of a mystery which unravels satisfyingly. The biggest mystery of all was whether Georgie and Darcy would make it down the aisle and into wedded bliss. Certainly seems the fates are against it! Another wonderful Georgie tale. Thank you, Ms. Bowen!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great story!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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literarymuseVC More than 1 year ago
Lady Georgiana Rannoch is soon to marry her love Darcy. Georgie is a cousin to the Queen but has agreed to forfeit her royalty in marrying a commoner, which she doesn’t mind one whit. Weddings are in the air it seems! Her mother is going to marry a German (not so wise in pre-WWII climate of 1935), her grandfather is planning on marrying his neighbor and Darcy’s father is planning on marrying a princess of England. Now she’s going to stay at the home of her mother’s ex-husband. Wedding plans are getting complex since Queen Mary wishes to attend and wants many royal persons there as well. That will all come together but what Georgie finds in Sir Hubert Anstruther’s country home is far from normal and is quite mysterious! The home is covered in dust but worse is the butler, maid, and cook with nasty attitudes. They refuse to take Georgie’s requests or even orders unless Sir Hubert Anstruther approves them. It also seems the help has been “cooking the books,” helping themselves to a mite extra for their loyal service (or lack of is more like it). No spoilers – suffice to say that a resident madwoman, someone turning on the gas taps in Georgie’s room, etc. and then a dead body pose significant risks to Georgie and her Mum, Grandad and maid/cook Queenie. One knows the mystery will be solved but it’s the process of discovering the crooks/would-be killers and killers that’s done in a light-hearted, fun manner. Darcy is occasionally present so the romance side is just a snippet here and there. Of course, although no one specifies what Darcy does for a living, it’s clear he’s a spy or something distinctly related to that profession. Enjoy Four Funerals and a Wedding, a highly enjoyable royal mystery! (Advanced Reader copy provided courtesy of Penguin Publishing Group in exchange for an honest review.)
CharlotteLynnsReviews More than 1 year ago
3.5 stars What a hoot of a story. Georgie is getting married to Darcy and neither of them has much money. When she is offered the chance to live at a grand estate she jumps at the chance. Little does she know what she is moving into. The beginning of the book moved a little slow. I wasn’t sure where it was heading and was anxious for it to get there. Maybe because I wasn’t familiar with the characters since this was the first book in this series that I have read I missed out on some of the story but I do not feel that was the case. Anyways, once Georgie moved to the estate the story flew. I was excited to learn what new trouble she would find, what she would do next, and what her housemates a.k.a employees were going to do next. Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding is a great historical fiction. There is plenty of laughs, plenty of fun, and some history. I recommend picking up your own copy.
Sailon More than 1 year ago
If you took the movie 4 Weddings and a Funeral and placed it in 1930's then you'd get this cute novel, Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding. Funtastic read. A proper, historical, British murder mystery and all the tea to back it up... I received this ARC copy of Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding from Berkley. This is my honest and voluntary review.
carol223CS More than 1 year ago
Rhys Bowen’s Four Funerals and Maybe A Wedding Lady Georgiana Rannoch is getting ready for her upcoming wedding to Darcy O'Mara. She is staying at Princess Zou Zou house in London as she is flat broke. Georgianna is a cousin to the Royal family as she is the granddaughter of Queen Victoria. Darcy and Georgianna are looking for a place to live after they are married. They cannot find what they want. Queen Mary invite the Royals to the wedding. The Queen offers them a place for their honeymoon. The Queen also asks Georgianna to have two younger princesses in her wedding. Then Georgie receives a letter from one of her mother’s ex-husband. He has made her his sole heir and wants her to move into his country estate at Ensleigh to make it her home before the wedding then live there with her husband there after they are wed. Arriving at the estate Georgie is shock at how the house is in disarray with a rude, inexperienced and incompetent staff. The rooms are sparsely furnished. Everything is covered and dusty. Something is not right and Georgie needs to get to the bottom of the situation. Soon after, Georgianna’s mother, grandfather and her maid/cook arrive on the scene. Now she must keep herself plus them safe from whatever is happening at the estate. The energy is palpable plus the danger is real. It is an intriguing, interesting read, complexly plotted historical fiction The setting is amazing with the huge estate with a fountain, a gazebo, a small chapel with a crypt housing some of the Georgie’s ex-stepfather’s ancestors. The cast were all creatively, well defined, colorful, vivid and artfully crafted characters. This hold for both the good and the sinister. Death, cancelled wedding plans, murder, robbery, danger, intrigue, drama, politics, beautiful dresses and humorous shenanigans, all add to the fast paced adventure. I volunteered to read Four Funerals and Maybe A Wedding. Thanks to Penguin’s First-to-Read Program for the opportunity. My opinion is my own.
carol223CS More than 1 year ago
Rhys Bowen’s Four Funerals and Maybe A Wedding Lady Georgiana Rannoch is getting ready for her upcoming wedding to Darcy O'Mara. She is staying at Princess Zou Zou house in London as she is flat broke. Georgianna is a cousin to the Royal family as she is the granddaughter of Queen Victoria. Darcy and Georgianna are looking for a place to live after they are married. They cannot find what they want. Queen Mary invite the Royals to the wedding. The Queen offers them a place for their honeymoon. The Queen also asks Georgianna to have two younger princesses in her wedding. Then Georgie receives a letter from one of her mother’s ex-husband. He has made her his sole heir and wants her to move into his country estate at Ensleigh to make it her home before the wedding then live there with her husband there after they are wed. Arriving at the estate Georgie is shock at how the house is in disarray with a rude, inexperienced and incompetent staff. The rooms are sparsely furnished. Everything is covered and dusty. Something is not right and Georgie needs to get to the bottom of the situation. Soon after, Georgianna’s mother, grandfather and her maid/cook arrive on the scene. Now she must keep herself plus them safe from whatever is happening at the estate. The energy is palpable plus the danger is real. It is an intriguing, interesting read, complexly plotted historical fiction The setting is amazing with the huge estate with a fountain, a gazebo, a small chapel with a crypt housing some of the Georgie’s ex-stepfather’s ancestors. The cast were all creatively, well defined, colorful, vivid and artfully crafted characters. This hold for both the good and the sinister. Death, cancelled wedding plans, murder, robbery, danger, intrigue, drama, politics, beautiful dresses and humorous shenanigans, all add to the fast paced adventure. I volunteered to read Four Funerals and Maybe A Wedding. Thanks to Penguin’s First-to-Read Program for the opportunity. My opinion is my own.
Katie__B More than 1 year ago
This was my first time reading a book in the Her Royal Spyness series and I enjoyed it so much I might have to go check out the previous books. Despite me jumping in to the 12th book in the series, I never felt lost as the author did a good job with giving background info of the main characters. This was just a really cute and fun book that takes place in 1930s England. I loved the historical fiction aspect of the book as members of the royal family were characters in the story. It was the characters and setting that held my interest more so than the actual mystery. Overall, an enjoyable read for when you are looking for a book that doesn't take itself too seriously. I won a free copy of this book in a giveaway but was under no obligation to post a review. All views expressed are my honest opinion.