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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780451532244
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/01/2013
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 83,109
Product dimensions: 4.10(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Born in London in 1797, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was the daughter of William Godwin, a noted social theorist, and Mary Wollstonecraft, one of the leading literary women of the day. Her mother died soon after her birth, and Mary was raised first under the care of servants, then by a stepmother, and lastly in the rarefied intellectual atmosphere of her father’s circle. In May, 1814, she met Percy Bysshe Shelley, and in July of the year moved with him to the Continent. Two years later, after the death of Shelley’s wife, the poet and Mary were able to marry. It was in Switzerland in 1816, as a result of a story-writing competition among the Shelleys and Lord Byron, that Mary began Frankenstein, her first and most famous novel. Published in 1818, it was followed by such works as Valperga (1823), The Last Man (1826), and Falkner (1837). In 1823, after the death of her husband, she devoted herself to the upbringing of her son and the securing of his right to the Shelley family title. She died in 1851.
 
Douglas Clegg is the award-winning author of more than 25 books, including Neverland, Isis and The Vampyricon trilogy.  His fiction encompasses gothic, suspense, fantasy and horror themes. An e-book pioneer, he created the internet’s first e-serial novel, Naomi, which was released in 1999.
 
Harold Bloom, the country’s preeminent literary critic, is Sterling Professor of the Humanities and English at Yale University. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Gold Medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Among his most important books are The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and How to Read and Why.

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VOLUME I

LETTER 1

To Mrs. Saville, England St. Petersburgh, Dec. 11th, 17—

You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings. I arrived here yesterday; and my first task is to assure my dear sister of my welfare, and increasing confidence in the success of my undertaking.

I am already far north of London; and as I walk in the streets of Petersburgh, I feel a cold northern breeze play upon my cheeks, which braces my nerves, and fills me with delight. Do you understand this feeling? This breeze, which has travelled from the regions towards which I am advancing, gives me a foretaste of those icy climes. Inspirited by this wind of promise, my day dreams become more fervent and vivid. I try in vain to be persuaded that the pole is the seat of frost and desolation; it ever presents itself to my imagination as the region of beauty and delight. There, Margaret, the sun is for ever visible, its broad disk just skirting the horizon, and diffusing a perpetual splendour. There—for with your leave, my sister, I will put some trust in preceding navigators—there snow and frost are banished; and, sailing over a calm sea, we may be wafted to a land surpassing in wonders and in beauty every region hitherto discovered on the habitable globe. Its productions and features may be without example, as the phenomena of the heavenly bodies undoubtedly are in those undiscovered solitudes. What may not be expected in a country of eternal light? I may there discover the wondrous power which attracts the needle; and may regulate a thousand celestial observations, that require onlythis voyage to render their seeming eccentricities consistent for ever. I shall satiate my ardent curiosity with the sight of a part of the world never before visited, and may tread a land never before imprinted by the foot of man. These are my enticements, and they are sufficient to conquer all fear of danger or death, and to induce me to commence this laborious voyage with the joy a child feels when he embarks in a little boat, with his holiday mates, on an expedition of discovery up his native river. But, supposing all these conjectures to be false, you cannot contest the inestimable benefit which I shall confer on all mankind to the last generation, by discovering a passage near the pole to those countries, to reach which at present so many months are requisite; or by ascertaining the secret of the magnet, which, if at all possible, can only be effected by an undertaking such as mine.

These reflections have dispelled the agitation with which I began my letter, and I feel my heart glow with an enthusiasm which elevates me to heaven; for nothing contributes so much to tranquillize the mind as a steady purpose—a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye. This expedition has been the favourite dream of my early years. I have read with ardour the accounts of the various voyages which have been made in the prospect of arriving at the North Pacific Ocean through the seas which surround the pole. You may remember that a history of all the voyages made for purposes of discovery composed the whole of our good uncle Thomas's library. My education was neglected, yet I was passionately fond of reading. These volumes were my study day and night, and my familiarity with them increased that regret which I had felt, as a child, on learning that my father's dying injunction had forbidden my uncle to allow me to embark in a seafaring life.

These visions faded when I perused, for the first time, those poets whose effusions, entranced my soul, and lifted it to heaven. I also became a poet, and for one year lived in a Paradise of my own creation; I imagined that I also might obtain a niche in the temple where the names of Homer and Shakespeare are consecrated. You are well acquainted with my failure, and how heavily I bore the disappointment. But just at that time I inherited the fortune of my cousin, and my thoughts were turned into the channel of their earlier bent.

Six years have passed since I resolved on my present undertaking. I can, even now, remember the hour from which I dedicated myself to this great enterprise. I commenced by inuring my body to hardship. I accompanied the whale-fishers on several expeditions to the North Sea; I voluntarily endured cold, famine, thirst, and want of sleep; I often worked harder than the common sailors during the day, and devoted my nights to the study of mathematics, the theory of medicine, and those branches of physical science from which a naval adventure might derive the greatest practical advantage. Twice I actually hired myself as an under-mate in a Greenland whaler, and acquitted myself to admiration. I must own I felt a little proud, when my captain offered me the second dignity in the vessel and intreated me to remain with the greatest earnestness so valuable did he consider my services.

And now, dear Margaret, do I not deserve to accomplish some great purpose? My life might have been passed in ease and luxury; but I preferred glory to every enticement that wealth placed in my path. Oh, that some encouraging voice would answer in the affirmative! My courage and my resolution is firm; but my hopes fluctuate, and my spirits are often depressed. I am about to proceed on a long and difficult voyage, the emergencies of which will demand all my fortitude: I am required not only to raise the spirits of others, but sometimes to sustain my own, when theirs are failing.

This is the most favourable period for travelling in Russia. They fly quickly over the snow in their sledges; the motion is pleasant, and, in my opinion, far more agreeable than that of an English stage-coach. The cold is not excessive, if you are wrapped in furs—a dress which I have already adopted; for there is a great difference between walking the deck and remaining seated motionless for hours, when no exercise prevents the blood from actually freezing in your veins. I have no ambition to lose my life on the post-road between St Petersburgh and Archangel.

I shall depart for the latter town in a fortnight or three weeks; and my intention is to hire a ship there, which can easily be done by paying the insurance for the owner, and to engage as many sailors as I think necessary among those who are accustomed to the whale-fishing. I do not intend to sail until the month of June; and when shall I return? Ah, dear sister, how can I answer this question? If I succeed, many, many months, perhaps years, will pass before you and I may meet. If I fail, you will see me again soon, or never.

Farewell, my dear, excellent Margaret. Heaven shower down blessings on you, and save me, that I may again and again testify my gratitude for all your love and kindness.

Your affectionate brother, R. Walton


From the Paperback edition.

Table of Contents

Preface.

Monsters, Visionaries, and Mary Shelley.
Aesthetic Adventures.
Edmund Burke, “On the Sublime and the Beautiful,” from A Philosophical Inquiry into the Origins of Our Ideas of the Sublime and the Beautiful.
Mary Wollstonecraft, from A Vindication of the Rights of Men.
William Gilpin, from Picturesque Travel.
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, from The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere, 1798.
Mary Wollstonecraft, Jemima's Story from Maria, or The Wrongs of Woman.
Mary Godwin (Shelley), journal entries.
Percy Shelley, from Alastor, or the Spirit of Solitude.
Mary Shelley, from History of a Six Weeks' Tour.
Percy Shelley, Mont Blanc.
George Gordon, Lord Byron, Canto 3 from Childe Harold's Pilgrimage III.
George Gordon, George Gordon, Lord Byron, A Fragment.
Richard Brinsley Peake, from Frankenstein, A Romantic Drama.
Mary Shelley, from a letter to E. J. Trelawny.
Dr. Benjamin Spock, “Enjoy Your Baby,” from Baby and Child Care.

Milton's Satan and Romantic Imaginations.
The King James Bible, Genesis, Chapters 2 and 3.
John Milton, from Paradise Lost.
William Godwin, from “An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice.
George Gordon, Lord Byron, “Prometheus.”
John Keats, To One Who Has Been Long in City Pent.
John Keats, Marginalia to Paradise Lost.
William Hazlitt, “On Shakespeare and Milton,” from Lectures on the English Poets.
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Preface Prometheus Unbound.
Percy Bysshe Shelley, from A Defence of Poetry.
Thomas De Quincey, “What Do We Mean by Literature?”

What the Reviews Said.
John Wilson Croker, Quarterly Review, January 1818.
Walter Scott, Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, March 1818.
Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany, March 1818.
Belle Assemblàe, March 1818.
The British Critic, April 1818.
Gentleman's Magazine, April 1818.
Monthly Review, April 1818.
The Literary Panorama and National Register, June 1818.
Knight's Quarterly Magazine, August 1824.
Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, March 1823.
London Morning Post, July 1823.
George Canning, remarks in the House of Commons, March 1824.
Knight's Quarterly Magazine, August 1824.
Percy Bysshe Shelley, Anthenfum, November 1832.

Further Reading and Viewing.

What People are Saying About This

Muriel Spark

Out of that vampire-laden fug of gruesomeness known as the English Gothic Romance, only the forbidding acrid name of Frankenstein remains in general usage... Mary Shelley had courage, she was inspired. Frankenstein has entertained, delighted and harrowed generations of readers to this day.

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Frankenstein 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1150 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very misunderstood story that sparked a concept that took on a life of it's own. There is no scary castle, no hunchback, or villigars with pitch forks! It is a story not about a monster but about what could happen when man kind tries to play creator. You end up feeling sorry for the creature.
jenmaynard More than 1 year ago
Often considered the first science fiction novel, Mary Shelley had the creative spark for Frankenstein at the age of 18 and first published it as a 22-year-old. A story inspired by other gothic writings, contemporary scientific theories, and by tragedies in her own life (the death of her young child, a father who had disowned her), not to mention her poet husband Percy Shelley (who would drown the following year) and the philosophies of other poets in her young and influential circle of friends, this novel is a thought-provoking and ground-breaking work that has inspired countless stories about our desire to overcome death and our search for what it means to be human. It's not your modern horror thriller or what is generally depicted in film (instead of grunts, Frankenstein's real monster is eloquently tragic), the plot is often plodding, and some current readers might not find this a good read. But for those who enjoy a more philosophically centered gothic tale, Frankenstein is immortal.
songcatchers More than 1 year ago
My first thought on completing Frankenstein was this: I love this book! I really didn't know what to expect when I began reading this. We've all seen Frankenstein and his "monster" portrayed through numerous media outlets and I wasn't sure how any of these compared to the original story created by Mary Shelley. From page one I was drawn in and riveted by the narrative. I was hooked on Victor Frankenstein with his ambition and his creation who showed such strong emotions. Frankenstein's creation is an infantile being born into the body of a monster. We watch as this "monster" teaches himself writing, language, geography, history. He reads from Milton's Paradise Lost and from Plutarch's Lives. Learning brought such joy to him. It was so sad to see the "monster's" attitude toward man (and especially Frankenstein in particular) go from such love and delight to dark feelings and hate. Frankenstein and his race pushed the "monster" away and shunned him because he didn't look like them. They never gave him a chance to prove his worth among them. I believe it was society that created the "monster", and not soley Victor, but it was Victor who reaped the punishment. Frankenstein, the novel, brings up some thought provoking questions dealing with science and life and what it means to be human. You'll have to read the book yourself and draw your own conclusions.

"So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein-more, far more, will I achieve: treading in the steps already marked, I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation."
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This, in my opinion has to be the most thought provoking in all of literature. I can't think of a novel more worthy of dicussing in a book club or just in general. It's authenticity still rings true in the twenty first century. It is a scientific study of whether or not we should tamper with God's creation or life, itself. This is the story of man's creation resulting in monstrous consequenses. The topic of conversation is regarding whether or not the monster really is a monster. Meaning he is not born monstrous but becomes so because he is shunned and turned away because of his frightening physical appearance. Would the monster be able to live in society with man if man had just given him a fair opportunity? Perhaps, but should he be given that opportunity under unnatural circumstances? After all, he is not human and created by God but by man. The question of who is a worse monster, him or Victor? Victor by far, for allowing the catastrophes to worsen repeatedly without properly handling the situation. The monster was his ruination from the first which goes back to should it have been attempted in the first place? Was it successful?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great book!!! I'm not a big fan of Science Fiction novels, but this one was great!!! When reading it, you don't feel like you are reading a Science fiction novel, you feel like you are reading a very sad, disturbing book about when humans should leave nature alone! You will never see Science and progress in it the same after you read this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I had to read this novel in my Science Fiction class in college. The novel was excellent with great written language, so beautiful. If you a big fan of Frankenstein movies, I would recommend that if you read this novel, don't expect the movies and the novel to be alike. The creature is so different than most of the Hollywood Frankensteins on film. The creature is somewhat a natural philosopher, but I won't give away too much! In other words, this novel is a must read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is so well writen. Even though it starts slow, the middle to end parts are so well done it makes up for the sluggish start. Also, anyone who says the book isnt well writen probably doesnt have the attention span to finish the first coupple of chapters or was probably expecting frankenstein to fight dracula before the end of the book
The_Booker More than 1 year ago
Should I review a classic? Really, what's the point? This book is historic and mandatory reading for many high schools and a true insight into the European era it was written (1818). Language, thoughts, opinions, attitudes, social classes, locations - it's all there. It's like a time machine and that aspect of the book is fasinating. Then there's the classic elements... This is true gothic horror. It's not blood and guts and "shoot'em up" that is all too necessary to hold an audiences' attention in today's world. "Frankenstein" is psychological terror in the same vein as "what's hiding around the corner." We follow Victor's inner thoughts and paranoia as he sinks deeper and deeper into depression, fear and finally resolve that he must kill the monster he created or die trying. As someone who was an avid reader in high school - but not the mandatory assignments, (my personal classics are more modern works) - it is quite a few years after my graduation. I picked up "Frankenstein" because it is my son's mandatory summer reader. Once I started, I couldn't put it down. But again - reviewing a classic? Okay - some may find this a lame excuse, but I only rated it 4 out of 5 stars because of my upbringing in the modern "shoot'em up" world. The meanings were all there for me - man vs God, man vs woman, etc... But there were too many coincidences within the story that made me shake my head in disbelief. Europe is a continent and not someone's neighborhood where even then it would be difficult to find someone hiding from you. But if you can shut down your reasoning and throw disbelief to the howling wind, "Frankenstein" has the fear factor to keep you awake and wondering at night who or what could be lurking around your neighborhood. One final note: For any high schooler thinking about skipping this mandatory reading assignment and watching the movie instead, just plan on testing for a GED after you wise up. The Boris Karloff version sticks to the book about as closely as the Abbott and Costello film. In fact, check out Gene Wilder in "Young Frankenstein" and write your report on that one. At least your teacher will have a few laughs grading your paper!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For Mary Shelley to produce such an amazing book as Frankenstein at the age of 21 is outstanding. The way that she has a story within a story-- that’s within a story, was so innovative. Her themes are very poignant and haunting. She explores and questions the boundaries of death, nature, good vs. evil, and justice. It’s very captivating because she explores the deepest and darkest places of human nature. The story begins with Victor Frankenstein’s ambitious love for science. The man goes as far as to cheat death itself, and he certainly heeds the consequences. She suggests that while accomplishing great feats in science, there will always be consequences. Shelley uses Frankenstein’s Monster who at first only desires a connection and human compassion, but he was shunned because of his hideous appearance and soon grows pure hatred for the human race. His heart wrenching self-discovering journey emphasizes on the small human interactions that we may take for granted. It’s just a very conflicting situation for the reader. He does go as far as to murder innocent people out of revenge, but you still can’t help to feel a bit of sorrow and guilt for the poor creature who only wanted the simplest thing in life: love. Mary Shelley’s work will always be a classic work that was ahead of it’s time. It’s an intense and eye opening tale that will stay with the reader for years to come.
Awesomeness1 More than 1 year ago
This book was deep and intellectually stimulated. While the writing was inconsistant, very descriptive in some parts and vague in others, you really had to pay attention or else miss something important. The plot and characters were intriguing, and I wish they were explored more. I never found it thrilling, but it was nice to read. I can see why its a classic and recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not your typical Frankenstein that you see from Hollywood. It is a great book that you can sit down and read. You read something new in it everytime you read it. Great for conversation in the classroom and book clubs. This book has you think about alot of things that relate to life. I highly recommend this book to everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book for summer reading. It is a very good book, however my biggest complaint is that Shelly has little emotion when describing the monster. I understand leaving some things to the imagination, however the creation of the monster was way too quick and there was no real emotional tie from Victor to the monster. That was written too fast and did not allow any time for emotional growth. Other than that, it is a great book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Frankenstein is the simple best book ever written (in my opinion). It relates to various sides of our lives, it is philosophical and exciting to read. It should be a must read for humanity because it teaches important lessons for life. It is very deep and emotional. Please do not think of any horror pictures that misinterpret the book, and thus mislead you.
Hardy_Zuri 5 hours ago
I bought this book for a college level English class. Even though this book was for an educational purpose at the time needed it, I found it to be exciting and interesting. There was a lot of adventure and guessing to keep me reading and wanting more. Frankenstein is a definite page-turner and will have you thinking about creation and what is considered beauty. The storylines of the characters are beautifully put together, so you can get a mental picture of who they are and what they look like, which is what I love about reading. The characters are exciting within themselves and do not rely on the main character to be interesting. This book will have you thinking about love, beauty, loyalty and family and what those really mean to you. Mary Shelley's Frankenstein is a small enough book you can toss in your bag and take with you on the go. It is a good read and you get invested in each character and start to feel empathy for the ones you wouldn't even think of. The movie is quite good as well, but the book has more imagination and feeling. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to read something thought-provoking and interesting. Even though this book is both Gothic and Science fiction it is not dark and dreary.
Anonymous 11 days ago
This was an awesome book . I am glad I bought . For a very old story and horror story of its time. Is very awesome
Pool_Boy on LibraryThing 18 days ago
Another reviewer commented '...This is verrrrry nineteenth-century Romantic, dramatic and melancholy and doomed destiny, played out over beautiful scenery without and horrible scenery within....' And I agree.While I am glad to have finally read the book, and actually got over the Romantic/Gothic whatever style of the writing (so much so that I could probably read other books from this era), I found it a real chore to finish. I just did not care what happened to anybody -- I never felt hope for Frankenstein, the creature, or the friends and family. Perhaps I am jaded, but it was not a riveting or compelling story to me. The one thing I did enjoy about the book was that it was absolutely nothing like all of the silly movies, pulp fiction rip offs or comics of this original story. And the story, despite my not really liking the whole package that much, was quite original. I really liked the fact that the creature was intelligent and could speak (shockingly well).Ah well, on to new stories.
Cyanide_Cola on LibraryThing 18 days ago
This is a great book. A essential reading for any horror fan. The story itself is timeless. It's one of those books that everyone should read at least once. I enjoyed this book when I read it back in high school and I still love it today.
JanaRose1 on LibraryThing 18 days ago
This classic by Mary Shelley was one of my favorites as a teenager. After re-reading it, I still feel the same. This book is the story of Dr. Frankenstein and the monster that he created. Immediately repulsed, Dr. Frankenstein rejects the monster, leaving it to roam Europe on its own. After hiding near a family, the monster learns how to talk and communicate and realizes that he is missing companionship. When Dr. Frankenstein refuses to create a companion for him, the monster begins killing his family. Overall, this is a book well worth reading.
mema1106 on LibraryThing 18 days ago
Frankenstein clearly represents the romantic tendency of striving against the limitation set by society and our own existance. First, there is an obvious example of Victor Frankenstein pushing his limitations as a human being by striving to play a God-like role. For Victor, it is not satisfying enugh to simply study philosophy and science and to master both subjects. He must continue and perfect the role of the scientist and attempt the impossible, a process that is extremely frustrating. In Frankenstein's perfect search for the perfect human, he creates a monster. Victor Frankenstein is not the only character that strives and challenges the limitations and boundaries set by human society. The monster Victor creates is engaged in his own struggle to communicate with society and to be a part of it. The pain of his multiple rejections and loneliness lead him to believe that "the human senses are insurmountable barriers to our union...if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear..." (Shelley 173). This decision brings the death of all major characters in the novel.This novel is an example of the romantic periods in that it uses a highly stylized and dramatized frame (Marien and Fleming). Frankenstein takes on these romantic characteristics and concerns that are so central to romantic writing and challenges the common use of them. By appropriating elements of the romantic and by combining them with elements that are clearly gothic, Mary Shelley expanded the possibilities of both genres. Sources:Marien, Mary Warner, and William Fleming. Arts & Ideas Vol 2. 10 ed. Belmont, CA. Thomson Wadsworth, 2005.Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Enriched Classics, 2004.
ComposerTP on LibraryThing 18 days ago
Frankenstein is a well-worded exploration of human nature. Shelley delivers a thought-provoking look at the deep sea of human emotions, as well as morality and character.The first-person perspective pulls you closely into the minds of the various narrators, immersing you in their experiences.Being written in the early 1800s, I would have expected it to be somewhat slow or unfamiliar in its language, but it actually sped along quite rapidly. Rarely did I have to stop and go back to make sense of anything. Shelley uses just the right wording for each idea. (It helped that I was reading it on a Kindle, and could instantly get definitions on unfamiliar words. But, once I knew the meanings of those words, I realized how well-chosen they were.)The story contains elements of horror and offers some pleasant thrills, but never becomes disturbing. Shelley writes implicitly rather than explicitly, which I found very satisfying in contrast to the modern popularity of gritty, raw story-telling.Fans of the gothic will also appreciate this book with its dark, cold, and angst-heavy atmosphere. It also classifies as science fiction on account of the speculative proposal it offers.It was a difficult book to put down. The momentum is continuous, and every sentence seems carefully crafted to be important. I wanted to make sure I didn't miss anything. I'm astonished that Shelley managed to write it at the age of 21. Brilliant!Recommended audience: Adults over 30. The older the better, because your life experience will affect your reflections on the content, making it richer.
mausergem on LibraryThing 18 days ago
Victor Frankenstein is a precocious kid. In his library he comes across many Greek authors and their works which in the 18th century is obsolete. With these ideas in his mind when he goes to university, he proceeds to create a living thing in the image of man. When this creature comes to life Victor is frightened by its ugliness and abandons it. The story proceed henceforward depicting the struggle between the creature and it's creator and ends in their demise.The beauty of the book is that we come to understand and sympathize with both of them. The antihero is born!
lunaverse on LibraryThing 19 days ago
This classic novel has a number of flaws that appeared in many novels back before we refined the art of exciting storytelling to a science. We take several chapters before we even meet Victor Frankenstein, and there is a lot of backstory told that isn't really needed. However, between the unnecessary exposition, there are many exciting and profound, and even emotional moments. Shelly went much further into character development than what I was expecting from what little I knew about the story - I knew the monster is misunderstood, but was not expecting the depth that is offered. The roots of modern sci-fi are found in books like this, and this should be considered a sci-fi classic. I also noticed hints of language and style that reminded me a lot of H.P. Lovecraft, particularly the descriptions of madness and angst, and themes of delving too far. Could it be that Lovecraft was heavily inspired by this novel? Possibly. A great book that should be part of anyone's repertoire if you wish to be functionally knowledgeable about literature and science-fiction.
Moriquen on LibraryThing 19 days ago
must say that this book can really still stand its ground as a classic. Todays horror stories focus too much on blood and gore, the classical ones are far more subtle. The horror lies in what mankind can put himself through. The prison he builds for himself.
cathymoore on LibraryThing 19 days ago
Although the change in pace and language from my usual diet of modern fiction took a bit of getting used to, I really enjoyed this. Shelley's descriptions of Frankenstein's descent into miserable madness and also that of the wretched and lonely existence of his creation are incredibly emotive. From the beginning I was sucked into the tale of Frankenstein's journey from naive young student through to the raving and hysterical individual he is towards the end of the book. When the story-telling his handed over to the monster itself, is when it becomes truly heart-breaking. The idea of an indivdual rejected by society purely because of his appearance has, I think great relevance still today. This is a true cautionary tale - perhaps we should all be careful what we wish for, and mindful of our selfish desires.
Blazingice0608 on LibraryThing 19 days ago
Great classic horror novel. Although it gets pretty deep, it could be read multiple times and analyzed from a psychological, socialogical, and literature aspect. I didnt care too much for the ending, and i felt like there were some parts that just bored me. However the good parts it had were REALLY good, plus i love books that have depth and can be analyzed and what not.