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Freud in Zion: Psychoanalysis and the Making of Modern Jewish Identity
     

Freud in Zion: Psychoanalysis and the Making of Modern Jewish Identity

by Eran J. Rolnik, Haim Watzman
 

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Freud in Zion tells the story of psychoanalysis coming to Jewish Palestine/Israel. In this groundbreaking study, psychoanalyst and historian Eran Rolnik explores the encounter between psychoanalysis, Judaism, Modern Hebrew culture and the Zionist revolution in a unique political and cultural context of war, immigration, ethnic tensions, colonial rule and

Overview

Freud in Zion tells the story of psychoanalysis coming to Jewish Palestine/Israel. In this groundbreaking study, psychoanalyst and historian Eran Rolnik explores the encounter between psychoanalysis, Judaism, Modern Hebrew culture and the Zionist revolution in a unique political and cultural context of war, immigration, ethnic tensions, colonial rule and nation building. Based on hundreds of hitherto unpublished documents, including many unpublished letters by Freud, this book integrates intellectual and social history to offer a moving and persuasive account of how psychoanalysis permeated popular and intellectual discourse in the emerging Jewish state.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"What Rolnik tries to do is rich and valid. If only we had more such scholarly attempts to study the evolution of psychoanalytic thinking in various societies....That Eran Rolnik wrote this one book is enough to be proud about. If we are fortunate, he will write more. Buy it. Read it."

“Eran Rolnik’s work is a story of psychoanalysis and a story of Israel. Unsparing in intellectual honesty Freud in Zion exemplifies the project undertaken as the name ‘psychoanalysis’. Great works of history are always moving. Recollections of things past is inevitably a matter of intense passion redolent with spiritual potential. We return to Freud many times, but Rolnik has us return to psychoanalysis as it moved East, a deeply compelling reading of the migration of ideas.”

“A rare combination of historiographic discipline and deep grasp of psychoanalytic thinking. This work is a significant contribution to analysts’ increasing their knowledge of how their specific institutions developed and how science in general unfolds.”

“One of the best books on the history of psychoanalysis that has been written in the last twenty years. Everybody interested in the history of psychoanalysis and in the cultural and social role that our discipline can play in the world should read and make use of this book.”

“ ‘Know thyself’ is a Greek injunction. The Jews countered it with a different one that could be phrased ‘Learn thy God’. When manifestly secular Jews such as Freud and his colleagues adopted the Greek ideal and meticulously developed around it an original theory and practice, the question of their Jewish identities did not remain external to their activity. Dr Eran Rolnik has written a wonderfully valuable book about the way these two ideals play off against one another. The reader of his original and inspired study will come to understand why psychoanalysis still plays an important role in current Israeli experience.’”

"An exemplary work of scholarship. I have rarely come a cross a book that deserve the unqualified praise that Freud in Zion deserves."

"This great work is a must read for anyone who enjoys the history of psychiatry and psychoanalysis in particular. This fantastic study looks deeply into the shared history of psychoanalysis and conflicts of Jewish identity and helps readers to understand more of its continued impact."

"Rolnik is a breath of fresh air in psychoanalytic historiography: he steers a middle course between the official story and revisionism to give us a story that is alive and pulsing with passion and that holds the reader’s interest from beginning to end."

"An intriguing story of ideological and sociological development, interspersed with historical details anchored in papers and documents that sound familiar, but are really new and uncharted."

"A remarkably thorough historical research into the early formative years of the establishment of the new psychoanalytic society in Jerusalem…presented as embedded in the wider historical social and cultural context of Europe, Zionism, Israel and Jewish migration from central Europe, as well as in the development and spreading of psychoanalysis."

"Rolnik’s study is a brilliant example of (a) new line of thought precisely because in the story which he tells, it is impossible to differentiate between which aspects are from the history of Zionism, and which are from the history of Freud – in other words, where psychoanalysis starts and where the ‘new Hebrew culture’ ends, and vice versa. An innovative and thoughtful book.”

"What Rolnik tries to do is rich and valid. If only we had more such scholarly attempts to study the evolution of psychoanalytic thinking in various societies. Buy it. Read it."

Christopher Bollas
“Eran Rolnik’s work is a story of psychoanalysis and a story of Israel. Unsparing in intellectual honesty Freud in Zion exemplifies the project undertaken as the name ‘psychoanalysis’. Great works of history are always moving. Recollections of things past is inevitably a matter of intense passion redolent with spiritual potential. We return to Freud many times, but Rolnik has us return to psychoanalysis as it moved East, a deeply compelling reading of the migration of ideas.”
A. B. Yehoshua
“ ‘Know thyself’ is a Greek injunction. The Jews countered it with a different one that could be phrased ‘Learn thy God’. When manifestly secular Jews such as Freud and his colleagues adopted the Greek ideal and meticulously developed around it an original theory and practice, the question of their Jewish identities did not remain external to their activity. Dr Eran Rolnik has written a wonderfully valuable book about the way these two ideals play off against one another. The reader of his original and inspired study will come to understand why psychoanalysis still plays an important role in current Israeli experience.’”
Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association
"Rolnik is a breath of fresh air in psychoanalytic historiography: he steers a middle course between the official story and revisionism to give us a story that is alive and pulsing with passion and that holds the reader’s interest from beginning to end."
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly
"An exemplary work of scholarship. I have rarely come a cross a book that deserve the unqualified praise that Freud in Zion deserves."
Psychodynamic Practice
"Rolnik’s study is a brilliant example of (a) new line of thought precisely because in the story which he tells, it is impossible to differentiate between which aspects are from the history of Zionism, and which are from the history of Freud – in other words, where psychoanalysis starts and where the ‘new Hebrew culture’ ends, and vice versa. An innovative and thoughtful book.”
Warren Poland
“A rare combination of historiographic discipline and deep grasp of psychoanalytic thinking. This work is a significant contribution to analysts’ increasing their knowledge of how their specific institutions developed and how science in general unfolds.”
International Psychoanalysis - Nathan Szajnberg
"What Rolnik tries to do is rich and valid. If only we had more such scholarly attempts to study the evolution of psychoanalytic thinking in various societies....That Eran Rolnik wrote this one book is enough to be proud about. If we are fortunate, he will write more. Buy it. Read it."
Riccardo Steiner
“One of the best books on the history of psychoanalysis that has been written in the last twenty years. Everybody interested in the history of psychoanalysis and in the cultural and social role that our discipline can play in the world should read and make use of this book.”
American Psychological Association Review of Books
"This great work is a must read for anyone who enjoys the history of psychiatry and psychoanalysis in particular. This fantastic study looks deeply into the shared history of psychoanalysis and conflicts of Jewish identity and helps readers to understand more of its continued impact."
Ha'aretz Review of Books
"An intriguing story of ideological and sociological development, interspersed with historical details anchored in papers and documents that sound familiar, but are really new and uncharted."
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis
"A remarkably thorough historical research into the early formative years of the establishment of the new psychoanalytic society in Jerusalem…presented as embedded in the wider historical social and cultural context of Europe, Zionism, Israel and Jewish migration from central Europe, as well as in the development and spreading of psychoanalysis."
InternationalPsychoanalysis.Net
"What Rolnik tries to do is rich and valid. If only we had more such scholarly attempts to study the evolution of psychoanalytic thinking in various societies. Buy it. Read it."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781780490533
Publisher:
Karnac Books
Publication date:
03/28/2012
Series:
History of Psychoanalysis Series
Pages:
288
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Eran J. Rolnik is a psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, and historian. He teaches at Tel-Aviv University and at the Max Eitingon Institute for Psychoanalysis in Jerusalem. He works in Tel Aviv in private practice.

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