Friends and Foes?

Friends and Foes?

by Bracy Ratcliff

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Product Details

BN ID: 2940014795746
Publisher: Bracy Ratcliff
Publication date: 06/12/2012
Series: A Dan Madison and Mike Madison Adventure , #2
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 308
File size: 192 KB

About the Author

Bracy grew up near New Orleans and though he has lived across the US, still considers the Crescent City his home; thus, his love for Creole food, Mardi Gras, Voodoo, Saints football and all that makes New Orleans unique. His writing reflects his heritage, though his works span continents and centuries. Mike Madison began as a short story composed for Bracy's young son, but has grown to a series of father/son adventures.

Bracy describes the Dan Madison and Mike Madison Adventures as "Family Mystery and Adventure" and has endeavored to keep the content appropriate for parents and their children to share.

He lives with his wife and son in the Pacific Northwest.

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Friends and Foes? 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wrote this, so clearly my opinion will not be viewed as objective. So what? I paid retail for my Nook edition, so earned my right to comment. It's a good book, not the Great American Novel, but pretty good. I like that the stories contain examples of the values we should be teaching our kids. Mike Madison is not a perfect kid, but he's honest, loyal, and respectful. His family and friends demonstrate what family and friends are about (or ought to be). The author stuggles in spots, blew a timeline in the first part about Kathryn's dad, use "HE" to start four paragraphs in a row, got a little redundant about friendship, used a couple of obscure references to things unique to a part of the country---but overall, the mistakes didn't take much away from the stories. I recommend it (and its predecessor, Mike Madison, Intrepid Explorer) to most any reader. Some won't be entertained by it, there's no profanity, no sex, very little violence (none very graphic), the setting is middle America, middle class, all mysteries are solved, the good guys win.