The Frightened Man

The Frightened Man

by Kenneth Cameron
3.5 13

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The Frightened Man 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
ChristyLockstein More than 1 year ago
The Frightened Man by Kenneth Cameron is the first in a possible series about American former military man Denton now living in London at the end of the 19th century. Denton has become well-known as a writer, but when a man comes to his door claiming knowledge about the decade old crimes of Jack the Ripper, he dismisses the terrified man as a crackpot. When the morning's newspapers gives details about the brutal murder of a young prostitute, Denton can't help wonder if it is connected to his visitor and begins to investigate, much to the detriment of his health and his finances. I adore Victorian murder mysteries, and when you throw in a tie to Jack the Ripper, I was quickly sold on the concept of this book. I did, however, have a hard time initially getting into the story. The reader is flung into Denton's personal life, and it takes some time for the story to find its feet. Once Denton started his investigation the story quickly picked up and was difficult to put down. Cameron doesn't fall prey to the standard cliches of this genre, and the story really begins to shine when Denton's foil Janet Striker comes on the scene. The dark past of the protagonist haunts the investigation and will provide fodder for plenty of sequels.
RKL More than 1 year ago
Some things I liked very much about this novel, others not so much. I thoroughly enjoyed Cameron's depiction of late 19th century London, the coppers, the Cockney dialogue, the ambiance. And I liked Denton, the hero. The not-so-great parts: Cameron commits that error so common to writers of historical fiction -- all the "good" characters think just like modern readers do regarding social issues, and all the "bad" characters, the reactionaries, are the ones who think like most of their contemporaries would have. For instance, we know without a doubt who the bad cop in the story is, because he refers to a black man as the "N-word." Civl War vet Denton has a fit and threatens to throw the bad cop out of his house for this. Perhaps I'm cynical, but I'm not sure that is realist for London in 1900. Further proof of Denton's enlightened state is that his love interest is a plain-looking feminist who claims that "men hate women" and won't poor his tea for him or let him see her to her door. Denton ruminates on her pretty extreme claim about men hating women, and because he is enlightened, he concludes she might be right about that. There are some problems with the murder mystery part too. Overall, though, it's a pretty good read. Not sure if I'll ever bother to read the other books in this series, but The Frightened Man is a pleasant way to pass the time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its the first time I have read this author's work. I know that I will definitely continue reading his books. The Frightened Man is a great thriller and mystery. The humor is well placed throughout the story. FIVE STARS!"!!
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mystery_librarian More than 1 year ago
This historical mystery set in 1900's London features General Denton, a Civil War veteran and former U.S. sheriff turned novelist, who has becomes obsessed by the murder of Stella Minter. Is Jack the Ripper back in business eviscerating prostitutes as R. Mulcahy, the frightened late night visitor to Denton, implies? Denton, disappointed by the police's lack of action, and maybe to avoid some of his own work and demons, pursues the murderer through the chaotic streets of London and the darker side of human nature, at great risk to himself and everyone around him. Not for the faint of heart this book is a violent, fast paced suspense, which drags the reader through the topics of voyeurism, and mutilation and comments on the treatment of women at turn of the century. An intelligent and well-written page-turner from Kenneth Cameron.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago