The Frog Prince

The Frog Prince

by Jane Porter

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781940296289
Publisher: Tule Publishing Group, LLC
Publication date: 03/19/2014
Pages: 262
Sales rank: 855,162
Product dimensions: 5.25(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.59(d)

Read an Excerpt

The Frog Prince


By Jane Porter

Warner Books

Copyright © 2005 Jane Porter
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-446-69449-5


Chapter One

Here comes the bride, all dressed in white. There goes the groom, running from the room ...

And there's my single mom, spending the next twenty years paying for a lavish wedding for a marriage that didn't even last a year.

Frick.

What happens now? What happens when you've had the fairy tale?

When you've done the big wedding? The dream honeymoon? What happens after the fantasy's over?

You file for divorce. Divorce. Such a big concept for what amounts to a little word.

I still can't quite say it, can't feel anything when I think it, can't imagine that we're now talking about me. But I was the one in the wedding gown, and then I was the one talking to a lawyer, and I was the one who had to ask my brother and my girlfriends and their boyfriends to help me pack so the movers could move me.

I've recently changed cities. Jobs. Lives. I'm starting all over again. But of course, it's not the same. It'll never be the same. Because I've done it. I've been married and divorced, and I'm not even twenty-six.

Long and short of it? He was perfect. I was raised in the country; he was French; together that made us French country. Perfect. The house was perfect; the car, a smokygray Citroen, was perfect; the clothes and restaurant and champagne ... perfect, perfect, perfect!

Not perfect.

Hindsight's amazing. I can see now there were problems in our relationship-huge problems, like trust, respect, and sexual compatibility. I should have known Jean-Marc wasn't attracted to me. I should have known he was avoiding physical intimacy. But I didn't. I blamed it on the wedding, new financial commitments, the stress of my moving into his house.

Maybe if I'd dated more ... Maybe if I'd had more realistic expectations ...

Maybe if I hadn't read fairy tales and then later all those romance novels I bought at the used-book store ...

But back to reality, and I've got more than enough to deal with in reality, what with my new job, in my new apartment, in my new city, with my new boss who doesn't seem to approve of anything I do.

In fact, right now my new boss, Olivia Dempsey, is standing next to my desk at City Events here in San Francisco, and she isn't happy. She's currently conveying her unhappiness in a very loud, crisp voice.

"I thought we talked about this," Olivia says, fashionably slim, toned arms crossed. "You have to take charge of your life, Holly. You're dying on the vine, girl."

I don't look up, because I don't want to hear this, at least not again, not so soon this week. Didn't I just get the need-to-get-out-more pep talk on Monday?

"You were crying in the bathroom again, weren't you?" I open my mouth to deny it, but she holds up a finger and wags it in front of my face. "Oh, no, no lying. No denying. And you weren't just crying; you were sobbing."

"I wasn't sobbing." I shoot her a disgusted look because even the word "sobbing" is irritating, but I know my eyes are red.

Olivia leans down, puts her face in mine. "Sara heard you." Sara being another member of Olivia's team.

I'm beginning to think I'm not ever going to warm up to Sara. She tries too hard to get Olivia to like her. "I'm over it," I say, forcing a toothy grin and feeling absurdly like the wolf from "Little Red Riding Hood."

"See?"

"Hmmph" is all Olivia gives me, but Olivia has no idea how hard all this is for me. No one knows how hard this has been.

There are days I still don't know how I manage to climb from the bed and stagger into the shower, days when I still cry as I make coffee and try to apply mascara and eyeliner between mopping up tears. It's just that I'd barely gotten used to the idea of being a bride, and now I'm a ... divorcee?

"You need to start getting out," Olivia adds firmly, her tone no-nonsense. "It's time for you to be proactive, not reactive."

Of course she'd think like this. She grew up immersed in the world of professional sports, and everything to Olivia is about offense and defense. If Olivia were an athlete, she'd be a quarterback and a pitcher rolled up into one.

"I'm getting out," I say, shifting uneasily, knowing that Olivia's voice carries and not being particularly eager to have the rest of the staff hear my shortcomings. Again. "I'm here, aren't I?"

It was supposed to be a joke, but she doesn't laugh. "This is work, Holly."

"Exactly."

Olivia rolls her eyes. She's beautiful. Even when she rolls her eyes, she looks sleek. Sexy. With the ultimate in DNA-Olivia's mother is a former model, the blonde, glossy type that graced the pages of Sports Illustrated, while her father dominated the Oakland Raiders' offense, a star wide receiver still talked about in hushed voices twenty years later. Olivia is perfection. She modeled for two years in Paris but hated it, apparently modeling wasn't challenging, as it did nothing for her mind.

"This is no social life," she says, leaning against the edge of my desk, her long legs even longer in snug, lowwaisted trousers, her black cashmere turtleneck sweater cropped short enough to reveal two inches of flat, toned midriff.

I feel like a slice of Wonder bread. "I don't need one." Her gray-green eyes narrow, squint. She looks at me hard, the same up-and-down sweep she gives decorated ballrooms before handing responsibility over to an underling. "You need something bad, girl."

Yes. I need my bed with my duvet pulled up over my head, but it's only Wednesday, and I have two more days before I get to dive back between my covers and stay there for the rest of the weekend. "Am I not performing?" I ask, trying to shift the focus from personal back to professional. Olivia was the one who hired me three months ago. She'd be the one who'd fire me.

Another narrowed-gaze inspection. "You've lost your ... edge."

Edge? I don't remember having an edge. I was desperate when I interviewed for the job, but there never really was an edge. I mentally add "Get edge" to my increasingly lengthy to-do list.

"You need attitude," she continues. "Presence." I say nothing because, quite frankly, I do have an attitude, and I suspect it's not the one she wants.

"What do you do when you go home, Holly?" Olivia's fine arched brows beetle. "Sit down in front of the TV-"

"No ..."

"Eat your way through a bag of chips? A carton of Ben and Jerry's Chunky Monkey?"

"I don't even like Chunky Monkey."

Olivia is gaining momentum. Her purple-black polished nails tap-tap the laminate on my desk. Her stellar eyebrows flatten. "You're getting fat."

The word "fat" hangs there a moment between us, pointed, sharp. Ugly. This is a full-scale assault.

For a moment nothing comes to mind, and I inhale hard, topple forward in my chair, feet clattering to stop my fall.

I check to see if anyone else has heard. This is about as low as anyone could go. She knows it. I know it. "I'm not fat."

Surreptitiously I glance down at my lap, homing in on my thighs. They do look rather big, but that's because I'm wearing speckled wool pants, and the fuzzy spotted texture isn't exactly slimming. "My clothes fit fine." Olivia shrugs. Says nothing.

I feel all hot on the inside, hot and prickly and a little bit queasy. I move my right thigh, check the shape. It does look rather spread out on the chair. "I need to work out," I add awkwardly. "I haven't joined a gym since moving here."

She shrugs again, and I look down, see my lunch still sitting on my desk: a half-eaten burrito, guacamole and sour cream oozing, obscuring the chicken and black beans.

I can picture my leg naked. Or what it must look like naked if I ever looked at myself in a full-length mirror anymore, because I avoid mirrors, especially full-length mirrors. I haven't taken a look at myself naked in, oh, three months-ever since I moved to San Francisco and realized I couldn't bear to look me in the eye, couldn't bear to see what I, once so pathetically hopeful, had become.

But beyond the burrito and the mirror, it's not all bad. I still drink Diet Coke. I've always drunk Diet Coke. There are limits to indulgence, and I know mine. "The point is," Olivia says more delicately, "you go straight home after work. You sit on your couch. Veg in front of the TV. That's no life, and you know it." For a moment I say nothing, because I'm not even thinking about my new apartment in San Francisco, but about the house I left in Fresno, where until recently I'd been a brand-spanking-new wife.

The house in Old Fig Garden was originally Jean-Marc's, a 1950s ranch that looked cozy and cottage-y with a split-rail fence and hardy yellow summer roses. After we married, I couldn't wait to make the house mine, too, and I loved personalizing it, adding festive, feminine touches like the new cherry-sprigged dish towels from my bridal shower, hanging on towel bars in the kitchen, or the sparkly crystal vase with zinnias and yellow roses displayed on Jean-Marc's dining table. We had new 300-threadcount sheets on the king-size bed and fluffy white-and-blue towels in the bathroom, and it was like a dollhouse. Charming. Warm. Storybook.

Turns out I wasn't the storybook wife.

"Holly."

Olivia's impatience cuts, and I look up quickly, so quickly I have to bite my lip to keep the rush of emotion away.

"You moved here to start fresh." Olivia taps her nail on my desk. "So do it."

Olivia's right. I'm lonely as hell, but I've hit the place where it's not just a little lonely but really lonely. The lonely where you slide below the radar screen, lonely where you've become pathetic, lonely where it's better just to stay inside, hidden from civilization.

I don't belong in civilization. I'm a misfit. A blight. Well, maybe not a blight. But I definitely feel like a pimple on a chin. As you know, not a good way to feel. Cautiously I shift my left leg, checking to see if the left thigh spreads as much as the right. It does. I suppress the rising panic. I'm in trouble, aren't I?

I look up, meet Olivia's eyes. "I am a little ... big ... ger."

The light of battle shines in Olivia's eyes. "It's not the end of the world. Yet." She sounds crisp now, decisive, as if we've settled on a plan, and she leans forward, urgency in her voice. "The key is to get a grip. Face whatever it is you're avoiding." She pauses, considers me. "Are you still in love with him?"

Him? Him, who? And then I realize she's talking about Jean-Marc. "Y-no. No!" I repeat more forcefully, because I'm not. How could I still be in love with a man who essentially rejected me on our honeymoon?

But Olivia isn't convinced. "Do you need professional help? There's no shame-"

"No." God, this is so humiliating. Olivia could be my mother. My mother would handle a conversation this way. "I'm fine. I'm ... better. Getting better." And bigger, according to Olivia. I squeeze out a smile. "But you're right. I need to take charge. Join a gym. Take better care of myself."

"What else?"

What else? I thought that was really good stuff. Olivia rises, and her stomach goes concave, making her trousers hit even lower on her magnificent hip bones.

"You need friends."

"I have friends."

"Where?" I open my mouth, but she holds up a slender honey-cocoa finger. "Don't say 'here.' Work isn't your social circle. If you got fired-"

"Am I getting fired?" Olivia doesn't own the company, but as a director she's high up in management, knows everything, has a say in everything. It doesn't hurt that Olivia has that enviable trait called star quality. People want to be around Olivia. Customers flock to City Events to work with Olivia. Olivia makes things happen.

"No." Olivia glances at my half-eaten burrito in the foil wrapper, the crumpled napkin on my desk, the Diet Coke with the smudge of lipstick on the rim, and the files spread open in front of me. "You work hard; you're conscientious, detail oriented."

But?

"But what happens here, at your desk, is only part of the job," she adds. "We're all responsible for bringing in new accounts, for promoting City Events, and one of the best ways to sell City Events is by selling you." And she smiles, a dazzling smile of lovely straight white teeth-her own, not veneers. "But you know that, Holly, and that's why I hired you."

I like her, I really do, and yet right now I'm wanting to crawl under my desk and stay there forever. More pathetic internal monologue: if Jean-Marc had loved me, I wouldn't be here, in San Francisco, in a strange, cold apartment, at a strange, confusing job, trying to figure out where I got it wrong, how I failed in love, why I'm the first of my friends to marry, as well as the first to divorce.

Rationally, I know that Olivia is trying to help me. It's her job to give me feedback and direction, but honestly, her cool, crisp analysis cuts, wounding my already bruised self-esteem. I know we're not supposed to rely on others for our self-worth. I know we're supposed to look inside for validation, but how are you supposed to like yourself, much less love yourself, when the person you trust most asks you just to go away?

"Two words," Olivia says, holding up two fingers and looking down her long, elegant nose at me.

"Zone diet?"

"Image. Success."

I can feel my thighs sprawl on the chair, the weight of my limp ponytail on my neck. How can it be only Wednesday? I need Friday. I really need Friday.

"You've got to take charge, Holly. I know you said in the interview you've just been through a rough patch-divorce, you said-but it's time to return to the land of the living. Get back in the ring. Make something happen."

"Right." And she is right. More or less. "We're going out for drinks after work. Join us. You already know some of my friends, and you'll meet some new people. It'll be good for you."

"Right." Her friends are gorgeous. And manically extroverted. A thought comes to me. "But cocktails have calories."

"A lot less than a pint of Ben and Jerry's." Enough said.

Olivia walks away. I stare at my desk. So that's where we are. I'm Holly Bishop, living the suddenly single girl life in San Francisco, which is also the turtleneck capital of the United States. Everyone here wears turtlenecks, lots and lots of black and gray turtlenecks with the inevitable leather coat, barn coat, barn leather coat. It might be the City by the Bay, but it's also the City of Cold Hands, Neck, and Feet.

Despite the need for sweaters even in July, I'm told that San Francisco is a great city to live in. You don't have to drive to get around; there's decent public transportation, but I don't know anyone who actually takes the public transportation. We drive on the West Coast.

And drive.

And drive.

We also pay huge sums to park. We pay for parking at work. We pay for parking at home. We pay for parking each time we head out to shop or see a flick or do anything remotely fun. (This is new to me. I was raised in a small town where you got free angle parking on Main Street.)

But I'm not in Kansas anymore, or in California's Central Valley, for that matter.

Continues...


Excerpted from The Frog Prince by Jane Porter Copyright © 2005 by Jane Porter. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Reading Group Guide

On Divorce:

  1. Holly is devastated over the failure of her "storybook marriage." In what way has her upbringing shaped her outlook on what a good, happy marriage is supposed to be?
  2. "Di-vorce. Such a big concept for what amounts to a little word." What are your thoughts on this statement? Why can some people go the distance? What makes a relationship last? Is it trust, respect, sexual compatibility? Something else?
  3. Holly states, "Nothing lasts forever. Know when to say when!" Do you agree?
On Mother/Daughter Relationships:
  1. What are some of the incidents Holly recalls from her childhood which have led her to the assumption she has always been a disappointment to her mother? What effect has this had on her own attitude towards her mother?
  2. Holly feels guilty about her relationship with her mother. How do you relate to this in terms of your own relationship with your mother/parent? What makes Mother/Daughter relationships so complicated? Do you feel like you really know your mother, why or why not?
  3. How does the relationship between Holly and her mother change in the end? Or will it really change?
  4. The "Good Girl" Syndrome. Do you believe it truly exists, why or why not? Did you ever get lectured about being a good girl? What "good girl rules" (i.e. "Don't kiss on the 1st date?", "Don't get a reputation") were you aware of as an adolescent?
On New Beginnings:
  • Holly says, "Life isn't a series of reruns and instant replays. There are no second chances, not the way we'd like." Since one can't go back, how does one move forward?
  • Have you ever had to begin again? Start Over? Change jobs? Move to a new city? Make new friends? What was the hardest part and how did you handle it? What is your opinion on how Holly chooses to handle it?

    On Relationships:

    1. Holly has a bad experience with Paul at the Italian restaurant, is embarrassed and leaves. Have you ever had a horrible dating experience, one in which you couldn't wait to get home? How did you cope with it?
    2. At the coffee shop, Holly meets a "hunk". Have you ever felt sexual attraction 'immediately' upon meeting someone? Was that due to physical appearance or personality? What is your opinion on the idea of falling in love at first sight?
    3. How do you feel about the statement there "has to be more magic somewhere? That good things can't just be at Disneyland? Adults need happy stories too?"
    4. How is Holly's concept of relationships affected by her father's betrayal to her family? Navigating the Business World:
    5. In what ways does the Good Girl Syndrome find its way into the business sector?
    6. How did Holly succeed in the corporate world? In what ways she did she fail?
    7. What are your thoughts on the character of Olivia Dempsey? What drives her? Do you know or work with someone who is like Olivia? Do women have to play hard or dirty to get ahead or can "nice" girls finish first? Why?

    Women & Self Image:

    1. Holly's refuge from the harsh realities of divorce lies in the comfort of food and her warm bed. When you've had instances when life closed in on you, what did you do?
    2. Holly's mom feels that Jean-Marc and marriage was the answer to Holly's happiness. Do you believe this is generational, why or why not? And what is one of the most important lessons Holly has learned about life and relationships by the end of the book?
    3. Katie Robinson, Holly's old high school friend, questions why Holly married Jean-Marc. Holly shares she wanted to be special. Katie points out that a man doesn't make you special; you're special because you're you! In what ways have you had to learn this lesson?
    4. Holly says "One shouldn't have to die— physically or psychologically for love. Love should be about strength, not weakness. Empowerment not dependence. Shouldn't it?" Would a woman this age really think this way? Or is this Dr. Phil speak?
    5. What does Holly discover about her own personality in terms of fairy tales and princesses? How does the 'new' Holly compare to the old one?
    6. How realistic are Holly's attitudes on life in terms of modern women today? Does she seem like a real, living, breathing person to you, why or why not? How do you relate to Holly?

    On Setting:

    1. The author, Jane Porter, has been quoted as saying she likes to use setting as a secondary character in her books. How do you see this in The Frog Prince? In what ways is her use of setting effective or evocative in The Frog Prince? If set in another city, would this story work as well, why or why not?
    2. How does Holly's depiction of growing up in a small town affect you? Are her memories of Visalia realistic or senti-mental? Why are childhood memories often bittersweet?
    3. How do the author's descriptions of San Francisco make the city come alive for you? Have you ever traveled to San Francisco? If not, would you want to now? If so, what do you recall as some of your favorite things about the experience?

  • Customer Reviews

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    Frog Prince 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
    CatmomJD More than 1 year ago
    Sometimes you just have to let go of the past and the the fears and regrets you have. In Holly's case, it's her bad marriage that she can't seem to get past. But, in this book, you see how she is able to finally get past all of that and enjoy life and finds a new love. This is one of those books that you'll want to read over and over.
    Guest More than 1 year ago
    The Frog Prince readers are taken to a new realm in discovering who you are and this book takes ¿relationships¿ to a new level. If you were raised to believe in fairy tales and along would come Prince Charming, then you will definitely relate to this book. It¿s an exploration into marriage, mother/daughter, sibling, friendship, and dating relationships. Holly the central character has been raised to be the ¿good girl¿, don¿t kiss on the first date, have a good reputation and basically keep your innermost feelings to yourself. She felt she really didn¿t know her mother nor her siblings and for the most part in her family, on the outside looking in. She marries Jean-Marc and thought this was an answer to her happiness. However, the marriage fails and she is empty and doesn't know how to ask for help from her family and friends. Relocation is Holly¿s only answer where she is now faced with a new city, new job and new friends. Here she learns there are no second chances and one can only move forward. Holly explores her past and what her future might hold. This book is an exploration for the reader as to why we need love, what makes a person special, do we suffer from family guilt, can we move forward and put past relationships behind and most important is there happy ever after? For the main character Holly, this was about learning who she was and moving forward. ¿It's the story of a young woman falling in love¿with herself. She discovers that she is wonderful, she's always been wonderful, all she has to do is trust herself¿. For me, this book hit right to the center of my heart! It was an exploration into my past, present and future as well. I sincerely recommend this book especially if you¿re a ¿Baby Boomer¿.
    Guest More than 1 year ago
    As simple as this review might seem....it touched my heart. The Frog Prince readers are taken to a new realm in discovering who you are and this book takes ¿relationships¿ to a new level. If you were raised to believe in fairy tales and along would come Prince Charming, then you will definitely relate to this book. It¿s an exploration into marriage, mother/daughter, sibling, friendship,the work place and dating relationships. Holly the central character has been raised to be the ¿good girl¿, don¿t kiss on the first date, have a good reputation and basically keep your innermost feelings to yourself. She felt she really didn¿t know her mother nor her siblings and for the most part in her family, on the outside looking in. She marries Jean-Marc and thought this was an answer to her happiness. However, the marriage fails and she is empty and doesn't know how to ask for help from her family and friends. Relocation is Holly¿s only answer where she is now faced with a new city, new job and new friends. Here she learns there are no second chances and one can only move forward. Holly explores her past and what her future might hold. This book is an exploration for the reader as to why we need love, what makes a person special, do we suffer from family guilt, can we move forward and put past relationships behind and most important is there happy ever after? For me, this book hit right to the center of my heart! It was an exploration into my past, present and future as well. I sincerely recommend this book especially if you¿re a ¿Baby Boomer¿.
    jedziedz on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    A quick, light read, I would recommend The Frog Prince to anyone who enjoys chick-lit. Holly is a great character once she gets over her self - esteem issues (and stops rambling on about fairy tales) and really starts to live for herself. I had a hard time understanding Holly's relationship with her mother and didn't really comprehend the motives of her ex-husband in seeking a divorce. I did enjoy the overall empowerment theme of creating your own happy ending. Great supporting characters and lots of funny scenes (especially the dating!) make The Frog Prince a fun read.
    roses on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    Great book! Read it in 2 days.
    Deesirings on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    Wow, I loved this book. Much more than I expected to. It was one of those random picks; I'd never heard of the book but wanted a chick lit paperback that I could easily read on the bus. The Beaverbrook branch of the Ottawa Public Library had slim pickings for books that fit the bill. (Incidentally, the Hazeldean branch is the opposite; it is a chick lit haven. That's the branch I generally frequent now.)I actually teared up toward the end, I was so moved by Holly's difficulties in maintaining a comfortable relationship with her mom (I could relate). It took me a few chapters to get into it. At first, it seemed like it could be another book where everyone in the big city, especially at work, is nasty and uncaring. (As it turns out, someone at work being nasty is a catalyst for the main character's development.)
    risadabomb on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    I really liked this book. The protagonist seemed real and I like the ending.
    calexis on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    I love the cover.. I think the dress and the sneakers just stand out so much.. and I suppose it's supposed to. But anyways, the story was ... delightful I suppose. I liked the way that Jane Porter incorporated her thoughts on fairy tales into the story line.Holly is this girl who wants her own happily ever after and in blindly wanting this, she loses sight and rushed into a relationship. I don't think her failed marriage is her fault... but like Jane Porter seems to show... fairy tales don't just happen. And it's more important to love and respect yourself before even loving or being loved.So.. this book isn't about Cinderella or Snow White.. it isn't about relying on a person to be happy. It's about finding your own happiness. It's a beautiful, motivate and love yourself, novel that happiness can happen. Just not always in the way we're taught to believe.
    ANovelMenagerie on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    The ReviewThis is the third of five books by Jane Porter that I have written a review on. To date, I have reviewed Flirting With Forty, Mrs. Perfect and Odd Mom Out. I am officially a Jane Porter fan! As I¿ve mentioned in prior posts, Easy On The Eyes is coming in July and it¿s going to be great!I¿m guessing that The Frog Prince was Porter¿s first Chick-Lit book. From what I¿ve read in the ¿About the Author¿ in the back of this book, she wanted to write a book that wasn¿t the typical ¿fairytale.¿ The Frog Prince is about suffering heartache and starting all over again. This book is about learning to love and accept ourselves, and our families, just for who we are. It¿s about being comfortable enough to say ¿no¿ to being with a man if the timing isn¿t right for you and saying ¿yes¿ when it is. It¿s about accomplishing things that you set out to do, just for yourself. It¿s about acting with integrity when others around you would love nothing more than to tear you down. It are these aspects of this book and Porter¿s writing that draw me to her and get me excited about the next book!As far as a review is concerned, I have to say that Odd Mom Out and Mrs. Perfect are still my two favorites. I say this although I think that Porter may have a soft spot in her heart for Flirting With Forty because that story most mirrors her life. I¿m excited to see what Easy on The Eyes will bring and am happy to say that Jane Porter is one of my favorite Chick Lit authors. She¿s made a life-long fan out of me! On Sher¿s ¿Out of Ten Scale:¿As the self-proclaimed ¿Queen of ChickLit,¿ I can say that this book is a solid read. I would recommend it for somebody in their 20¿s and just out of a breakup of a long term relationship or marriage. Although, I enjoyed it even though I¿m old and crusty! For the genre Fiction:Women¿s Fiction/ChickLit, I am going to rate this book an 8 OUT OF 10.
    trishalynn0708 on LibraryThing 10 months ago
    What a fun book, and do you not love the cover? The cover is as fun as the book was. This was another book I could not put down. The way the author portrays Holly makes you feel like you are her. The divorcee with nothing but yourself and your thighs that seem to be getting bigger by the day, the girl who has no friends and can not believe that her life is practically over after only being married a year. And we all can relate to the hot stuck up woman who wants to be your friend but in the end they get jealous of you coming out of your shell and making something of yourself and being happy. I just really enjoyed this book. It was a fun read and kept you entertained. I know the book was long-371 pages- but I feel like it could have been more on her relationship at the end. The book teases you, especially with Brian. Then at the end it doesn't say what happened or what is going on. This book could have been another 100+ pages and it still would have held my interest. I think more pages would have completed the book and said where she stood guy wise. It was still a great read though!
    MarilynS on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
    The Frog Prince readers are taken to a new realm in discovering who you are and this book takes ¿relationships¿ to a new level. If you were raised to believe in fairy tales and along would come Prince Charming, then you will definitely relate to this book.It¿s an exploration into marriage, mother/daughter, sibling, friendship, and dating relationships.Holly the central character has been raised to be the ¿good girl¿, don¿t kiss on the first date, have a good reputation and basically keep your innermost feelings to yourself. She felt she really didn¿t know her mother nor her siblings and for the most part in her family, on the outside looking in. She marries Jean-Marc and thought this was an answer to her happiness. However, the marriage fails and she is empty and doesn't know how to ask for help from her family and friends. Relocation is Holly¿s only answer where she is now faced with a new city, new job and new friends. Here she learns there are no second chances and one can only move forward. Holly explores her past and what her future might hold.This book is an exploration for the reader as to why we need love, what makes a person special, do we suffer from family guilt, can we move forward and put past relationships behind and most important is there happy ever after? For the main character Holly, this was about learning who she was and moving forward. ¿It's the story of a young woman falling in love¿with herself. She discovers that she is wonderful, she's always been wonderful, all she has to do is trust herself¿.For me, this book hit right to the center of my heart! It was an exploration into my past, present and future as well. I sincerely recommend this book especially if you¿re a ¿Baby Boomer¿.
    julieford More than 1 year ago
    The Frog Prince by Jane Porter is well written. I read the entire book but I felt that Holly was too needy for my tastes.
    momof3boysj More than 1 year ago
    Holly Bishop believed in the fairy tales. And, that old cliché about kissing a lot of frogs to find your prince. But life smacks her in the face with her husband telling her on the honeymoon he doesn't want to be married. She tried everything before giving up and filing for divorce. Getting on with her life isn't easy despite starting over in a new town. Finally with a lot of kicking, screaming, cajoling from work and friends, plus a lot of hard work and determination, she finds her life and her bliss. She discovers that you don't need a man to complete you, you make your own happiness, and in the end you don't have to be a good girl to be a GOOD GIRL. Just be the best self you can be--shouldn't we all find this in ourselves? I loved this journey! It's a great book! Read it--and stop kissing toads!
    Kribss More than 1 year ago
    I forgot how great this book is! I read it a few years ago and decided to re-read it. Because Holly's character/life is so  relatable on so many levels, I couldn't put the book down till the very end. I loved that it ends on a happy note but its not the fairy tale we expect. Also love the message it gives- be confident and you don't have to be in a relationship to be happy.  
    kimberlyindy More than 1 year ago
    This was the first Jane Porter book I ever bought and because I enjoyed it so much I became a reader of Porter's books for life. Jane's character Holly had the fairytale we all as little girls dream, about, but as most of us discover there is no such thing. She takes us on Holly's journey to make a new life for her, and learning to have confidence in herself. Holly doesn't have it easy just as life is not a piece of cake. I found myself cheering her on and maybe learning about myself in the process.
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    Guest More than 1 year ago
    I read a lot of chick lit, and I was really surprised by this book. The emotional journey we take with the main character, Holly Bishop, is very well done. Jane Porter captures the fear and the pain Holly feels, but also lets us see her hopefulness in the end. I could not put this book down and I hope you won't either.
    Guest More than 1 year ago
    This is not a serious read, but sometimes you just need some 'fluff' in your literary diet and this is a good piece of fluff. In a way, the writing style reminded me a bit of Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum novels. As a young woman myself living near San Francisco, I found this book endearing and empowering. She really develops as a strong woman through the pain life throws at her. Kudos to the author for writing a believable woman coming into her own and discovering what she's really made of.