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From Every Stage
     

From Every Stage

3.0 1
by Joan Baez
 
Listening to this album a quarter century after the fact is an eerie experience; as a Baez fan of the same period and of a politically similar orientation at the time, this reviewer was shocked by the vitriol of the opening number, "(Ain't Gonna Let Nobody) Turn Me Around," especially given that the shows where this album was recorded dated from

Overview

Listening to this album a quarter century after the fact is an eerie experience; as a Baez fan of the same period and of a politically similar orientation at the time, this reviewer was shocked by the vitriol of the opening number, "(Ain't Gonna Let Nobody) Turn Me Around," especially given that the shows where this album was recorded dated from 1975. Was anyone (except maybe the Reagan-ites) ever really that angry at the Ford administration? Otherwise, Baez's trembling falsetto is in beautiful shape on songs ranging from Leonard Cohen's "Suzanne" to "Oh, Happy Day." The album was recorded on the tour supporting the release of Diamonds & Rust, but nothing of that album except the title track is represented here; rather, Baez performs five Bob Dylan songs (which get the most rousing reception), three of her better originals, including "Blessed Are" and "Diamonds and Rust," and a brace of traditional songs and covers of a handful of other composers' work, including "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." Apart from the opening outpouring of political venom, there's not too much controversy here -- a pair of songs, "Natalia" and "The Ballad of Sacco and Vanzett," dedicated to political prisoners and an ambitious but ultimately awkward adaptation of "Stewball" are as topical as most of the show gets. Baez is in superb voice and the backing septet, mostly heard on the second disc, has a surprisingly lean sound. Ultimately, From Every Stage is a good, albeit far slicker follow-up to Baez's two early-'60s live albums on Vanguard, though it says something about the nature of her history at A&M Records that five years into her contract with that label, all but a handful of the songs here were associated with her prior record label.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/19/1993
Label:
A&M
UPC:
0075021650626
catalogNumber:
6506
Rank:
20125

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Joan Baez   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Larry Carlton   Guitar
Jim Gordon   Drums
Dan Ferguson   Guitar
James Jamerson   Bass
David Briggs   Keyboards

Technical Credits

Emmylou Harris   Composer
Joan Baez   Arranger
Bob Dylan   Composer
Robbie Robertson   Composer
Dale Ashby   Engineer
Bill Danoff   Composer
John Herald   Composer
Alex Kazanegras   Engineer,Remixing
David Kershenbaum   Producer
John Newton   Composer
Ralph Rinzler   Composer
Bob Yellin   Composer
Dinky Dawson   Live Mixing
Bernard Gelb   Executive Producer
Dawson   Engineer
Traditional   Composer

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From Every Stage 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
glauver More than 1 year ago
From Every Stage is a good introduction to Joan Baez. That said, it has some weaknesses. Disc 1's topical songs have dated badly, especially if you don't remember the 70s. I do, but the effect is more nostalgic than effective. Disc 2 is better.The backup combo does a good job and the songs are not stuck in a time warp. It's nice to hear her version of Please Come to Boston, a hit for one-shot folkie Dave Loggins. Her Vangaurd period was her peak, and she fell out of commercial favor shortly after this set came out. All in all, this is a good sampler of Joan Baez when she still meant something to her generation.