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From Hardships to Championships
     

From Hardships to Championships

by Glenn Stout, Ike Williams
 

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Praise for Good Sports:
“Never patronizing, [Stout] captures both grit and glory.” —Kirkus Reviews

Many of the baseball greats overcame huge challenges to be sports heroes—here are five inspiring stories of men who did just that. Baseball is considered America’s pastime, but not all players grew up living the American

Overview

Praise for Good Sports:
“Never patronizing, [Stout] captures both grit and glory.” —Kirkus Reviews

Many of the baseball greats overcame huge challenges to be sports heroes—here are five inspiring stories of men who did just that. Baseball is considered America’s pastime, but not all players grew up living the American dream. Babe Ruth, Jim Peirsall, Torii Hunter, Ron LeFlore, and Joe Torre sure didn’t. Poverty, abuse, and addiction are a few of the issues they had to deal with as kids, but they turned their lives around to play the game they loved.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristi Bernard
Sports players always seem to make what they do seem so easy. It's almost as if they were born to do what we see them do so well. But in this edition to the "Good Sport" series, we learn the history behind some baseball players. It was a long and rough road that seemingly got them to where they are now. There are many wonderful players and they all have a story to tell and these pages hold a few of their stories. Babe Ruth was a hero to many New York Yankees fans, but his childhood and the mischief he got into was nothing heroic. Growing up poor, Babe, then George, stole food, smoked, drank and used bad language at a very early age. After stealing cash from a drawer, George was sent to St. Mary's Catholic Church for orphans, juvenile delinquents and neglected boys. While there, Brother Mathias took George under his wing and changed his life. Jimmy Piersalls, another popular player, had a manic depressive disorder, but still managed to have a successful baseball career for Boston, the Cleveland Indians, the New York Mets and the California Angels. Ron LeFlore, was a prisoner at Michigan State Penitentiary. He too came from a troubled childhood. When a judge took pity on him he became a model prisoner from playing baseball. He ended up playing for the Tigers, the Montreal Expos and the Chicago White Sox. Stout has put together a wonderful series of true stories for any fan of baseball. There are lots of little-known facts throughout the pages. Reading these stories of hardship and rise to fame are sure to keep any reader amazed and engaged. Reviewer: Kristi Bernard

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547887357
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
02/26/2013
Series:
Good Sports Series
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
907,252
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

GLENN STOUT is the author of Young Woman and the Sea and Fenway 1912.

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