Gabriel's Story

Gabriel's Story

by David Anthony Durham
4.6 8

NOOK Book(eBook)

$11.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Gabriel's Story 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is beautifully written. It tells the story of the 1870s American West from a rarely heard African American perspective. Anybody who loves westerns, mystery, history, family drama and poetic, descriptive writing should should read this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If I could, I would give this novel a 3.8. I was just not engrossed in this book as most are. Maybe it's because my mind was still on another book I've just finished, prior to this one. Even so, I never did care for the wild west, or it's adventures, for that matter. I found myself unable to put the book down, only because I wished to be done of it as soon as possible. I never was one to abandon a book after I've begun it. However, I did like the well-developed characters, especially Dunlop. I also enjoyed Durham's literary techniques and the way he strung his words together. He is a writer who can paint great pictures with his words .. it was just that the topic did not appeal to me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
With Gabriels Story, young Mr. Durham has hit a homerun his first time at bat! McMurtry's Lonesome Dove & McArthy's All The Pretty Horses come to mind when I think of Western epics, and I'm sure Mr. Durham would say he owes a debt of gratitude to those great American authors, though the style in Gabriels Story is his own. In McMurtry's best books,even the bad guys have a certain appeal, due to their 'character'...don't expect that in this book! Durham's debut novel revolves around themes that are timeless, and it's to his credit that even with a formula that's 'tried and true' he can make it all seem so fresh. Some of the violence may be a bit much for some readers, but it is central to the story's theme and not overdone. What amazes me most about this book is that it's Mr. Durham's first novel published...Do yourself a favor and enjoy this work of one of America's great young writers.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Okay, so I'm not usually a Western type of person. Too much macho gun play... But I picked this up, opened it randomly and read... And I loved the language. I was immediately engaged. I closed it, opened it again and read... And the same thing happened. So, I was hooked. The writing seemed too good to pass up. Bought it and began from the beginning. I'm not actually finished yet, but so far it's been pretty great. It is a Western, I guess, but it's written with an eye toward serious literature. The descriptions of landscape are wonderful, a pleasure to read just by themselves. It has it's violent moments, I'm learning, but the author keeps a tight control on it. He takes me right to the edge of my comfort zone, teeters there, and then moves on. It's not always comfortable, but it is always compelling. And I can't help thinking the story is working on more than one level... I'm glad to have a first edition of this one, and I hope to see more from the author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The plot is wonderful. The Characters are ungorgettable. The saga of a young black boy's will to survive the post-civil war era. Brutal. Yet honest.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I just finished Gabriel's Story and I'm amazed. It's literature as it should be but rarely is. Firstly, Durham's writing is wonderful, thoughtful, full of vivid images, a large cast of characters and an historical backdrop that's well done but not overdone. But secondly, the narrative moves. He creates wonderful characters that you care about and then sends them on an amazing adventure. It's all perfectly believable, but crazy and dangerous as well. The tension builds right up to the end and, somehow, he manages to pull it all together in the last few pages. Literature, yes. A great read? Yes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Durham's first entry into the novel industry is an elloquently told tale of a young man, forced to grow up before his time. Themes of love, betrayal, maturity, and even racism are masterfully brought to life by Durham's skillfull use of metaphor. Such metaphor's produced some of the most memborable visualizations of the surroundings in the novel, and left an indelible mark in my mind. This book will undoubtedly become an American literary classic, and stand the test of time for all future generations to enjoy.