Galaxy Games: The Challengers

Galaxy Games: The Challengers

by Greg R. Fishbone

NOOK Book(eBook)

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Overview

Things are looking up for Tyler Sato (literally!) as he and his friends scan the sky for a star named after him by his Tokyo cousins on his eleventh birthday. Ordinary stars stay in one place, but Ty’s is streaking toward Earth. Soon the world is talking about TY SATO, the doomsday asteroid, and life is turned upside down for Ty Sato, the boy, who would rather be playing hoops in the driveway.
Meanwhile, aboard a silver spaceship heading for Earth, M’Frozza, a girl with three eyes and five nose holes, is on a secret mission. M’Frozza is the captain of Mrendaria’s Galaxy Games team, and she is desperate to save her world from a dishonorable performance in the biggest sporting event in the universe.
What will happen when Ty meets M’Frozza? Get ready for the most important event in human history—it’ll be off the backboard, around the rim, and out of this world!

Product Details

BN ID: 2940013255876
Publisher: Lee & Low Books / Tu Books
Publication date: 09/15/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 3 MB
Age Range: 9 - 12 Years

About the Author

GREG R. FISHBONE serves as Assistant Regional Coordinator for the three New England chapters of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). His hometown of Boston shaped his love of sports, history, and clam chowder. Fishbone also developed a healthy obsession with science fiction and fantasy stories. Between (and often during) classes, he doodled spaceships and plotted out his own early efforts at writing.
After college, Fishbone attended law school in three countries, including Japan. He considered staying there until he learned that the Japanese term for “foreign attorney working in Japan,” could also mean “outhouse.” This made for many awkward conversations including the line, “I am studying hard and hope to become an outhouse someday.”
Practicing law by day and writing by night, Fishbone still hopes to become an outhouse someday. He lives in Waltham, Massachusetts, with his wife and daughter.

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Galaxy Games: The Challengers 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
GaryWOlson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The opening book of the Galaxy Games trilogy finds 11-year-old Tyler Sato at the center of a crisis neither he nor the world expected: a star named after him has turned out not to be a star but an object heading for Earth. The object proves to be a starship bearing some startling news: Earth has declared a challenge against an alien world, one that can only be resolved through a game. Tyler is drafted to lead an international group of young athletes in a contest where he has to learn the rules as he goes along, and hope somehow he doesn't ruin Earth's first contact with the stars.Greg Fishbone has long displayed a gift for blending likeable characters, just-this-side-of-ludicrous situations, fast-paced action, and humor that both kids and adults will enjoy. (Hey, I was grinning and sometimes laughing out loud, and there wasn't a middle schooler anywhere around.) I was reminded of both the fun adventure feel of the Lucky Starr books I enjoyed as a kid and the character-driven humor of the Discworld books, though the story itself is derivative of neither. I'm definitely looking forward to the next volume.
GHott More than 1 year ago
Eleven is a big year. It’s all downhill after that. Tyler’s dad spends his days studying the stars, so when Tyler”s aunt and uncle have a star named Ty Sato after him he decides it’s the coolest birthday gift ever. Not impressed, Dad takes Tyler and his friends to work with him the following evening to find the star. What they find instead, is that this star is actually an asteroid hurling directly towards earth. Or is it? Review: A really cute book. It seemed a bit long to me but the boys really got into it.
Gary_W_Olson More than 1 year ago
The opening book of the Galaxy Games trilogy finds 11-year-old Tyler Sato at the center of a crisis neither he nor the world expected: a star named after him has turned out not to be a star but an object heading for Earth. The object proves to be a starship bearing some startling news: Earth has declared a challenge against an alien world, one that can only be resolved through a game. Tyler is drafted to lead an international group of young athletes in a contest where he has to learn the rules as he goes along, and hope somehow he doesn't ruin Earth's first contact with the stars. Greg Fishbone has long displayed a gift for blending likeable characters, just-this-side-of-ludicrous situations, fast-paced action, and humor that both kids and adults will enjoy. (Hey, I was grinning and sometimes laughing out loud, and there wasn't a middle schooler anywhere around.) I was reminded of both the fun adventure feel of the Lucky Starr books I enjoyed as a kid and the character-driven humor of the Discworld books, though the story itself is derivative of neither. I'm definitely looking forward to the next volume.