Gargantua and Pantagruel

Gargantua and Pantagruel

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Overview

Gargantua and Pantagruel by Francois Rabelais

A masterly new translation of Rabelais’s robust scatalogical comedy

Parodying everyone from classic authors to his own contemporaries, the dazzling and exuberant stories of Rabelais expose human follies with mischievous and often obscene humor. Gargantua depicts a young giant who becomes a cultured Christian knight. Pantagruel portrays Gargantua’s bookish son who becomes a Renaissance Socrates, divinely guided by wisdom and by his idiotic, self-loving companion, Panurge.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780140445503
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/26/2006
Edition description: Revised
Pages: 1104
Sales rank: 360,541
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.80(h) x 1.90(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

François Rabelais was born at the end of the fifteenth century. A Franciscan monk turned Benedictine, he abandoned the cloister in 1530 and began to study medicine at Montpellier. Two years later he wrote his first work, Pantagruel, which revealed his genius as a storyteller, satirist, propagandist and creator of comic situations and characters. In 1534 he published Gargantua, a companion to Pantagruel, which contains some of his best work. It mocks old-fashioned theological education, and opposes the monastic ideal, contrasting it with a free society of noble Evangelicals. Following an outburst of repression in late 1534, Rabelais abandoned his post of doctor at the Hotel-Dieu at Lyons and despite Royal support his book Tiers Livre was condemned. His last work, and his boldest, Quart Livre was published in 1551 and he died two years later. For the last years of his life Rabelais was persecuted by both religious and civil authorities for his publications. His genius however was recognized in his own day and his influence was great.
Dr. M. A. Screech is a Senior Research Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of University College London; he long served on the committee of the Warburg Institute as Fielden Professor of French Language and Literature in London, until his election to All Souls in 1984. He is a Renaissance scholar of international renown. His books include Montaigne and Melancholy, as well as Rabelais and (on Erasmus) Ecstasy and the Praise of Folly; all are acknowledged to be classic studies in their fields.

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Gargantua and Pantagruel (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
absolutly grosse, vile, and lewd, i can't believe that someone has written such a perfect novel. anyone who claims that classic litterature can't be fun, has not read this novel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Bawdy and funny! A great read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Recommended for fans of The Satyricon.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was pretty amusing for an old book. I would read it again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Rabelais does not need my help, and his place in the Literature of the West is secure. The encyclopediac comic mind of the first order exploring the human being with obsessive attention to physical and spiritual function and disfunction has amused generations of readers. Why I do not personally go for it so much I think relates to the reservations of my own character. I do not particularly love scatology .I am not impressed by reading accounts of how we relieve ourselves. More importantly I think the whole irreverent, satirical spirit that makes Rabelais so loved and laughed with by so many readers just does not bring me any joy. It seems to me too easy and cheap. There is also of course the longeurs in listing of the whole thing. And this without at all mentioning the particular place of the scholar's revolt in the world of his time. This is thought by many to be the funniest book of all time but I do not laugh at it this way. Who would however know the history of Western literature must know this work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yeah, he was believe it or not and he was kinda looped. He writes about all teh sinful things he couldn't partake in. This set of stores about the giants is absolutely appalling and funny as all get out at the same time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought it was okay. I mean, if you like reading 16th century porn then go ahead. I had to read this book for an ethics class. First few chapter are okay but then they start talking about inappropriate things x.x. I reccomend this book to be read by an older audience (as if a teenager would understand old English anyways). Overall, I thought it was an easy read dispite its size and large amount of pages.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Honestly folks, I like scatalogical humor and irreverence as Much as the last fool , but this is not that funny . WHAT REALLY TURNED ME OFF WAS THE ANIMAL CRUELTY THAT PASSED FOR LAUGHS IN THOSE DAYS !