Gaudy Night (Lord Peter Wimsey Series #10)

Gaudy Night (Lord Peter Wimsey Series #10)

by Dorothy L. Sayers
4.6 21

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Gaudy Night 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having read all of the Lord Peter Whimsey mysteries, I can safely say this one is my favorite, and not just because of the romance part, either. This story is more than a mystery, it is a contemplation of how people think, and how other people don't understand them. It is a dense book, but in a good way. As much as I loved the t.v. version, it didn't touch the surface of the actual book. And to see how the character of Lord Peter changes from her earlier books to this one is very interesting. He becomes very real. It really is a study of phsycology rather than a mystery, but you certainly won't be disappointed. You'll be blissfully taken off to Oxford and her dreamy spires, and punted down the Cherwell with Harriet and Lord Peter showing you the sights. It's a lovely trip.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read all of Dorothy Sayers' books and this is my favorite, I have read and re-read it and have enjoyed it even more upon reread.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read my first Dorothy Sayers' book just a few years ago. I found Peter Wimsey one of the most interesting sleuths I've ever encountered in my reading. He's right up there with Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. I read all the Wimsey books in order and while this one isn't my favorite for the plot (that would be 'Have His Carcase'), I found Gaudy Night to be a very fascinating look at Oxford College life at a time when women were just beginning to be accepted at University although definitely still in a second-class sort of way. The plot is a mystery, of course, but it also adds a degree of tenseness that kept me reading quickly to see what would happen next. Peter and Harriet further their relationship to a point that is not surprising but quite sweet. The locations in Oxford are for the most part real except for the fictional women's college where much of the action takes place. I was able to use Google Maps and found many of the locations she wrote about in this book. It made it seem more real to me to see places like Balliol College, the Bodleian Library and the Magdalen Bridge with the boats on the Cherwell. Harriet Vane is quite competent and she may could have solved the mystery without Peter so she found having him there both satisfying and frustrating which pretty much sums up her feelings about him up until the end of this book. Solving the mystery resolved the tension and allowed her to come to understand how she really felt about Peter. This leads to the next Wimsey book, Busman's Honeymoon, which I also recommend.
Anonymous 14 hours ago
Vicious anonymous notes and multiple acts of spiteful sabotage are the focus of this mystery. In solving it, Sayers touches on many topics, including: the role of women in academia and the workforce, the necessity of supporting a family versus artistic or scholastic integrity, keeping one's identity in a marriage, eugenics and other pre-WWII political/social topics, etc. Also, Peter and Harriet finally talk to each other rather than at each other, and sort out their feelings for one another. The charming Miss Climpson of previous Wimsey books is mentioned but not utilized. We do meet Peter's oldest nephew.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Long winded and slow.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is one of my favorite books. Although not a traditional English murder mystery, the lack of the the traditional homicide somehow makes this book even more intriguing, emotionally satisfying, and fascinating. This is Sayers' masterpiece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A classic setting and a very literate read one of these days will try t find out who le faun was buska
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srj More than 1 year ago
Ian Carmichael provides the definitive audio versions of the Lord Peter works of DLS. Gaudy Night is no exception. For the devotees of Ms. Sayers, this provides the key to how Lord Peter and Harriet finally overcome her resistance to their union. A lovely listen.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The detection in this novel takes second seat to the heroine's personal life, which was fine by me since her personal life included the hilarious and intriguing Lord Peter Wimsey. This was my first Sayers, and most hopefully not my last. I only picked it up after reading The Oxford Book of Oxford (in which there was a Gaudy Night excerpt that got me interested), and I don't regret my choice in the least. There was plenty of Oxford to go around, and plenty of educated rambling. The conclusion (on a mystery level) was not quite a satisfactory shocker, but quite satisfying on matters of principle. Sayers doesn't hold a candle up to Christie for her detection element, but surpasses Christie in characterization. Great read if you're in the mood for something slightly frivolous and all 1930's.
Guest More than 1 year ago
At about the same time that Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett were founding the American detective tradition -- and with at least as much skill -- Dorothy Sayers was founding the subtler British tradition. Uniquely, another sort of mystery threads from HAVE HIS CARCASE through STRONG POISON to culminate in GAUDY NIGHT: Will sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey ever win the hand of mystery writer Harriet Vane, whom he saves from a false murder charge in the first book of this trilogy? Refusing to exploit the debt she owes him, he woos Harriet with a delicacy and respect unknown to modern sex-in-the-city-type courtship. The crime-solving is terrific, too. Agatha Christie and P.D. James are among Sayers's many literary heirs.
Guest More than 1 year ago
While it is an okay read, it tries too hard to be 'literature' and not the typical detective novel. The mystery takes a backseat to Harriet's mental chaos.