The Geography of Girlhood

The Geography of Girlhood

by Kirsten Smith

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316017350
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date: 02/07/2007
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 192
Sales rank: 757,474
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range: 12 - 18 Years

About the Author

Kirsten Smith first began writing poetry while attending Occidental College but has made a career out of writing screenplays. Her credits include 10 Things I Hate About You, Legally Blonde, and Ella Enchanted.

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Geography of Girlhood 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
monajones on LibraryThing 30 days ago
A novel in verse, The Geography of Girlhood provides a poetic glimpse into the tumultuous world of a teenaged girl. Narrator Penny Morrow chronicles her life from ages 14-18 in free-form verse, detailing her world of sadness, awkwardness, confusion, anger, resentment, and small victories, all told with a disarming detachment. The verses are deceptively bite-sized and easy to ingest; she doesn't wallow in her misery or reveal too much of her personal angst, but you can sense it in the white space of the pages.Author Kirsten Smith, who helped write a number of screenplays about teenagers (10 Things I Hate About You, Ella Enchanted), expertly inhabits the mind and body of a confused teenager who has moments of clarity. Penny has a lot of personal issues to deal with -- an absent mother, her father's remarriage, a popular older sister, infatuation and first kisses, changing friendships -- and the verse form helps keep things succinct and to the point. No superfluous words, just the facts. It reminds us how difficult it can be to come of age.
kayceel on LibraryThing 30 days ago
Girl writes in verse about her mother¿s abandonment. So unremarkable, I can¿t even remember what it was about¿
stephxsu on LibraryThing 30 days ago
THE GEOGRAPHY OF GIRLHOOD is a novel-in-verse that stares unflinchingly into the broken and confused life of a high school girl. Penny¿s mother left her, her father, and her older sister Tara a long time ago. Tara is the cool older sister who hardly gives Penny the time of day, and Penny¿s two best friends are drifting apart, turning into people she hardly knows.Thus, Penny must navigate the choppy waters of adolescence by herself. Sometimes she gets things right, but most of the time she¿ll make mistakes. Either way, however, her story is a real, believable, and heartbreaking one that any teenage girl will like to pick up.
Karla26 on LibraryThing 30 days ago
Penny is a fifteen year old, wishing she was just like her sister. Although, her sister had all the looks from her mom she was not the perfect child. As this book goes from poem to poem, Penny's attitude changes and so does her view of things. When she was little, her mother had abandoned her and her sister along with her father. Her father remarries, and at this she gets a tepmother and a stepbrother. She starts to realize that sometimes the person you least expect to fall inlove with, is the on for you. Her kindness is slowly coming out, once she finds happiness and inner peace with herself.
Kaydence on LibraryThing 30 days ago
My thoughts:Positive: * This went with my my theme of reading novels written in poetry. * It reminded me of how I was in high school. I was kinda lost and floating through friends. Although, I never ran away. * It's much like a movie.Negative: * It's extremely sad with no real ending. * I think that she doesn't ever realize how much she was taken advantage of and that would have been a strong lesson to learn. * It can be a little bit too like a movie and not completely believable.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
So so
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kept my attention from the start
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
bookhugger1 More than 1 year ago
The Geography of Girlhood is definitely memorable in the way that Smith expresses every single thought, feeling, and emotion that the characters are feeling. Smith makes an author relate to the main character at so many levels, but also introduces the reader to the mind of teen girls that parents or adults may have never experienced before. I thought it was amazing that other reviews suggested that every girl, lady, or woman would relate to it, but I know there are several issues that the girl goes through that I could not even begin to relate to. Although the form of the literature is interesting and makes it an easy read, there were some parts where it became a little complicated to follow along because of the problems each girl is facing. But, nonetheless it is an intense read if you enjoy reading the minds of some dark and mysterious girls growing up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Awesomeness1 More than 1 year ago
This book is all right if you are into verse novels, but if you are more traditional, it probably won't be your cup of tea. Its not really a novel. Given the poems and short length of the book, it only tells the major events of Penny's life, with little or no transition. The poems are okay, but definitely not the best. Probably won't hold readers attention, as it does not build supsense or anything, and is usually blocky. I wouldn't reccomend buying it, but if you think you might want to read it, check it out at the library.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was........... so/so. There was really no plot, just a bunch of events in a girl's life jumbled together to make a novel. I'm not even sure that the main characters name was ever mentioned.......
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Novels told in verse usually fall into two categories: those that simply tell a story with poetry, and those that manage to capture a life so eloquently in verse that you fall headfirst into the story. THE GEOGRAPHY OF GIRLHOOD, thankfully, falls into the latter category. Kirsten Smith has managed to pen, through verse, the story of fourteen-year old Penny Marrow, a girl you will laugh with, cry with, and get to know very, very well within the pages of this book.

Penny's older sister, Tara, was blessed with the beauty, and the ability to cut her sister down with only a glance. Her father's hope is simply that his daughters will have listened to him enough to stay away from bad boys and make a place for themselves in the world. And as for her mother? She left when Penny was six, and the only thing Penny has to remind her of her mom is a snow globe. Now she has a stepmother, and a younger stepbrother, and a family life that can be summed up with "don't be like your sister."

For Penny, life is confusing, with the fights her friends have regularly and the first kiss that makes her faint and the huge infatuation she has on her sister's boyfriend. But behind it all is the wish that her mother would just come home, would be returned by the aliens who abducted her or whatever, and make everything better. For Penny, watching her father change and her sister change and herself change is too much to take without a mother. But years pass, and when she finally gets one thing that she wants--which is Bobby--it's not at all like she expected, and she loses friends and gains new acquaintances and still, in the back of her mind, she wants her mother.

THE GEOGRAPHY OF GIRLHOOD is sweet and bitter, a poignant story filled with joy and heartbreak about growing up and learning to let go and first love. Thankfully, this is a book told in verse that you won't soon forget, a definite recommended read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Novels told in verse usually fall into two categories: those that simply tell a story with poetry, and those that manage to capture a life so eloquently in verse that you fall headfirst into the story. THE GEOGRAPHY OF GIRLHOOD, thankfully, falls into the latter category. Kirsten Smith has managed to pen, through verse, the story of fourteen-year-old Penny Marrow, a girl you will laugh with, cry with, and get to know very, very well within the pages of this book. Penny's older sister, Tara, was blessed with the beauty, and the ability to cut her sister down with only a glance. Her father's hope is simply that his daughters will have listened to him enough to stay away from bad boys and make a place for themselves in the world. And as for her mother? She left when Penny was six, and the only thing Penny has to remind her of her mom is a snow globe. Now she has a stepmother, and a younger stepbrother, and a family life that can be summed up with 'don't be like your sister.' For Penny, life is confusing, with the fights her friends have regularly and the first kiss that makes her faint and the huge infatuation she has on her sister's boyfriend. But behind it all is the wish that her mother would just come home, would be returned by the aliens who abducted her or whatever, and make everything better. For Penny, watching her father change and her sister change and herself change is too much to take without a mother. But years pass, and when she finally gets one thing that she wants--which is Bobby--it's not at all like she expected, and she loses friends and gains new acquaintances and still, in the back of her mind, she wants her mother. THE GEOGRAPHY OF GIRLHOOD is sweet and bitter, a poignant story filled with joy and heartbreak about growing up and learning to let go and first love. Thankfully, this is a book told in verse that you won't soon forget, a definite recommended read.