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George Foreman's Guide to Life: How to Get up off the Canvas When Life Knocks You Down
     

George Foreman's Guide to Life: How to Get up off the Canvas When Life Knocks You Down

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by George Foreman, Linda Kulman (With)
 

George Foreman knows what it's like to get knocked down — in the ring and in life — and he knows how to get back up again. Two-time heavyweight boxing champion of the world, he knows what it takes to succeed. He has a wealth of life experience to share, and in George Foreman's Guide to Life: How to Get Up Off the Canvas When Life Knocks You Down

Overview

George Foreman knows what it's like to get knocked down — in the ring and in life — and he knows how to get back up again. Two-time heavyweight boxing champion of the world, he knows what it takes to succeed. He has a wealth of life experience to share, and in George Foreman's Guide to Life: How to Get Up Off the Canvas When Life Knocks You Down he does just that. Here's what George has to say about:

TAKING ADVICE: "The real answers you are looking for are inside of you. The hard part is being able to hear them."

BEING AFRAID OF CHANGE: "Be afraid to stay where you are in life. Stepping out...is what makes you good, better, and even the best at what you're doing."

GETTING OLDER: "Old age is not something that happens to you; it's a choice you make. You can look in the mirror and cry...or you can look in that mirror...and dream another dream."

LEARNING FROM YOUR MISTAKES: "I try to let the past stay where it is and let today speak for itself....Learn from your mistakes but don't be chained to them."

DETERMINATION: "There are always others trying to get to the same goal you are, only they decide to stop halfway down the road. And when they walk away, they leave the road paved for you."

MARRIAGE: "Let every day be like the first day you fell in love. It's about trying to put your best self forward, not just to others but to the one you've pledged your life to."

CHILDREN: "I believe how you teach your kids life's lessons is as important as what you teach them. You've got to love kids into another gear."

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Puncher preacher, rancher, family man, author, grill shill, founder of a youth and community center, author and sage; is there anything Foreman can't do? Most people know Foreman as the guy who named all five of his boys George, or as the lovable lug spokesman for Meineke mufflers and George Foreman grills. Why listen to his advice? First of all, he's been very successful at that long list of callings. He also made a triumphant return to boxing at age 45, winning the heavyweight title from a 26-year-old champ, so maybe he does have a tip or two worth hearing. Reading his own material, Foreman comes off as a friendly guy with a heart of gold and a pocket full of advice. The production's only major flaw is the swelling of inappropriate new age music between chapters (the insipid music is co-written by Foreman). Aside from that, this audiobook, simplistic but heartfelt, provides inspiration and motivation. Simultaneous release with the Simon & Schuster hardcover (Forecasts, Jan. 6). (Jan.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Former boxing champion Foreman (By George) shares his life lessons here, showing how to turn hardship to happiness, overcome adversity, and achieve fulfillment no matter what life brings. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416570936
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster
Publication date:
05/28/2007
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.70(d)

Read an Excerpt


George Foreman's Guide to Life

How to Get Up Off the Canvas When Life Knocks You Down



By George Foreman
Simon & Schuster
Copyright © 2007

George Foreman
All right reserved.



ISBN: 9781416570936



Introduction

There's hardly a single lesson I've learned in life that didn't come the hard way. So I know that life can sometimes seem like a big hole, and that you have to be pulled up out of it from time to time. But I also know you can pull yourself out. I say this as someone who read his first whole books at the age of sixteen; who was married and divorced four times and found the fifth time to be the charm; who's the oldest person ever to hold the heavyweight boxing title. I know from experience that you should never give up on yourself or others, no matter what. Everyone in life goes through a hard time sometime, but you can't let that define who you are. What defines you is how you come back from those troubles and what you find in life to smile about.

I grew up the fifth of seven children in the toughest neighborhood in Houston, and I didn't have a lot to look forward to in life. At least I didn't think I did. I was hungry all the time; I dropped out of school in the eighth grade; I relied on my size and my fists to make my way. I became the world heavyweight champion against Joe Frazier in 1973, only to lose the title I'd worked so hard for a year later in my fight against Muhammad Ali. Imagine losing everything you think matters to you in tenseconds. For a long time in my life, I was so full of rage, people couldn't wait to get out of my way -- just like when you see a Doberman pinscher and cross to the other side of the street.

I see a lot of tough guys come into the George Foreman Youth and Community Center in Houston who remind me of myself when I was a teenager. Just like my old friend and boxing coach in California, Charles "Doc" Broadus, did with me, I always put them in the ring against the smallest guy there who knows how to box. The big guy comes out all bluster and swinging this way and that. And the little guy doesn't even hit him, he just moves out of the way until after a while, the big guy is completely out of breath. That's usually about the time he realizes that the smaller guy could have killed him with a few well-placed jabs and that it's how you fight that counts.

This book is about fighting smart for all the things that really matter in life: yourself, your relationships, and your kids. I have done some crying while doing this book. I have gotten some old bones out of the closet, brought back memories I needed to refresh myself with, and reminded myself of some valuable lessons.

As the father of ten children, I am often called on for advice, and I always try to make my kids understand that any advice I offer is a gift. Just as with any other gift, once you give it, it's no longer yours. It belongs to those you've given it to, and it's theirs to do with as they see fit. That's the spirit in which I hope you read what I have to say.


Copyright © 2002 by George Foreman


Chapter One: Don't Take My Advice

I got an e-mail not long ago from one of my grown daughters who lives far from home telling me how lonely she sometimes is; and that there is no one in her life right now to look to for advice. I know how she feels; I've been in that same place. Because no matter how blessed you are to have loving relationships with family and friends, there are times in nearly everyone's life when you feel the same way, when you say to yourself, "Who should I turn to?"

The answer is simple: you. The real answers you are looking for are inside of you. The hard part is being able to hear them. Listening to yourself is no different than being able to listen to what someone else tells you. Say you're in a relationship that you really want to work but deep in your heart you know it's not right for you. Your friends can tell you it's bad for you, that you've got to get out of it. But you're not going to make a move until you're ready. It's the same whether you're telling yourself to leave or someone else is telling you.

Wisdom is nothing more than a covenant with the truth. I made a pledge to myself long ago that no matter how much the truth hurts, I would accept it and hold myself to it. That is all wisdom is. To be able to see a lie or an injustice, you have to first look inside yourself, searching every corner of your mind, looking to clean every bit of your conscience. If you do this from day to day, the gift is complete: You can take advice from yourself.

Even if you have never found yourself without someone to turn to, your parents or your spouse or your best friend might not always be there, just as I won't always be there for my daughter. One day, you will have dreams, hopes, and disappointments so personal that you will not be able to tell those folks or anyone else about them. These you have to figure out for yourself.

Another reason it's so important for you to be able to trust yourself is that long after anyone else gives you advice, they will have forgotten what they told you. You're the only one who will have to live with the decisions you made. There is one person who has to look out for you always with the greatest intentions. That person is you. You will no doubt meet many people in this life, as I have, people who will love you, who will try to provide for you and instruct you along the way. But even if other people are there to love you, it's important to remember that, ultimately, they are just like you. They are human beings, with all their own fears, trying like everybody else to make it through each day. No one has all the answers; otherwise, why would people have so many fears?

Who you take advice from says a lot about who you are. I have been a few different people in my life, but I now have a person who I respect and trust: me. And until you reach that place in life you are at the mercy of fate.


Copyright © 2002 by George Foreman



Continues...



Excerpted from George Foreman's Guide to Life by George Foreman Copyright © 2007 by George Foreman. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

George Foreman is a two-time former heavyweight champion of the world, an Olympic gold medalist, a revolutionary in the grilling industry, and an ordained minister, in addition to being a best-selling author. He lives in Houston, Texas, where he founded the George Foreman Youth and Community Center.

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George Foreman's Guide to Life: How to Get Up Off the Canvas When Life Knocks You Down 0 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'george formans guide to life' is a very remarkable book. each chapter has a very special principle from his own experiences and years which makes somebody elses life alittle better. he is a bestselling arthur,a minister, and a gold medal winner. the 2 principles that I liked the most were:self esteem and never give up. this book can be a big help for lots of people cause so many people give up. great gift idea for a friend or family member.