×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

George Washington
     

George Washington

by George Washington, John H. Rhodehamel (Editor)
 

See All Formats & Editions

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back

Overview

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883011239
Publisher:
Library of America
Publication date:
02/28/1997
Series:
Library of America Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
1184
Sales rank:
610,306
Product dimensions:
5.07(w) x 8.11(h) x 1.44(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Read an Excerpt

About 100 comments about life, government, politics, culture and interpersonal relations from America's first president. The new series look features a classic portrait of the author on the front cover with his signature printed below in gold foil.

Meet the Author

1732-1799

1706-1780

Thomas Jefferson was born in Virginia in 1743 into a wealthy and socially prominent family. After attending the College of William and Mary, he went on to study law. At the age of twenty-six, Jefferson began building Monticello. Three years later, in 1772, he married Martha Wayles Skelton. The couple had six children, two of whom survived to adulthood. Considered elequent in his writing, although not as his speech, Jefferson took on much of the writing needed by the Virginia House of Burgesses and the Continental Congress, both of which he was a member. In 1776, at the young age of 33, Jefferson drafted the Declaration of Independence. From 1779 to 1781, Jefferson served as Governor of Virginia. Jefferson temporarily retired from public life after his term as governor, returning to public life in 1784 as a diplomat serving in France. In 1790, Jefferson was appointed Secretary of State in President Washington's Cabinet, but resigned in 1793 over a disagreement with Alexander Hamilton. As political disagreements continued to polarize the young government, Jefferson found himself leading those who sympathized with the revolutionary cause in France. In 1800, Jefferson was elected President in a tie vote that ironically was decided by Alexander Hamilton. In 1809, after two terms as President, Jefferson returned to his home in Monticello, where he developed, among other projects, plans for the University of Virginia. In addition, he sold his collection of books to the government to form the basis of the Library of Congress. Thomas Jefferson died on July 4, 1826.

1802-1880

Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) was the sixteenth president of the United States best-known for helping to abolish slavery during the Civil War, and his tragic assassination just days after the war ended.

1811-1896

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) is perhaps America's best-loved poet. His most popular works include The Sonf of Hiawatha, The Village Blacksmith, and, of course, Paul Revere's Ride.

Author of "Ticonderoga" and "Lake George and Lake Champlain."

Charles W. Eliot (1834-1926) was president of Harvard University for 40 years, the longest term in Harvard's history.

Elvy Kalep was a contemporary of Amelia Earheart and a renowned aviatrix in her own right during the 1930s and 1940's. Around WWII, Elvy Kalep Aviatrix dolls were popular toys for little girls.

Frank Gelett Burgess was born in Boston in 1866. After getting a degree from MIT in 1887, he moved to California to teach at U. Cal Berkeley. While there, and later in New York and Paris, he wrote many humorous novels, poems and stories, many of which are still in print, including Goops and How to Be Them, More Goops and How Not to Be Them, and The Purple Cow. Burgess died in 1951 in Carmel, CA.

Andrew F. Smith teaches culinary history at the New School University in Manhattan and serves on the Board of the Culinary Trust. He is the General Editor for the University of Illinois's Food Series and the editor in chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America. He is the author or editor of eight books on food history.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews