Ghost Force (Admiral Arnold Morgan Series #9)

Ghost Force (Admiral Arnold Morgan Series #9)

by Patrick Robinson
3.1 10

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Overview

Ghost Force (Admiral Arnold Morgan Series #9) by Patrick Robinson

The year is 2011.

An oil-hungry world is starving . . .

. . . and Argentina, with Russia's help, is determined to brutally wrest the petroleum-rich Falkland Islands from British hands. Enraged over this brazen act of international piracy, Great Britain dispatches a battle fleet to the islands for the second time in thirty years—unaware that Viper K-157, a lethal Russian Akula-class submarine, lies in wait, stuffed to the gunwales with ship-killingtorpedoes.

America cannot sit idle as hell explodes in the South Atlantic and, under the stern eye of Admiral Arnold Morgan, the military's most powerful weapon is unleashed to hammer Argentina into submission: the U.S. Navy SEALs. The outcome of the unforeseen war that's igniting in America's backyard ultimately depends upon her awesome "ghost force” and their successful execution of two remarkable clandestine missions—while the consequences of failure may be too terrible to consider.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780061827341
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 10/13/2009
Series: Admiral Arnold Morgan Series , #9
Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 480
Sales rank: 94,425
File size: 709 KB

About the Author

Patrick Robinson is the author of seven international bestselling suspense thrillers, including Nimitz Class and Hunter Killer, as well as several nonfiction bestsellers. He divides his time between Ireland and Cape Cod.

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Ghost Force 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Not a perfect book but a good read. All facts not perfect but that is fiction. Kept my interest all the way through. I enjoyed it for a pure fiction based on some fact. I would recommend it for an enjoyable couple of days reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As usual Patrick Robinson has done it again. If you liked the first Admiral Morgan series you will like this one.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
OK read, but should be moved from the category 'Fiction' to 'Fantasy'. The Admiral Morgan character does not exist, either in military annals or current military command, and will never exist in the future. I flew in the RCAF for years and never came across any commander who acted or spoke like Morgan. Robinson needs to ease up on the bs pedal when characterizing Morgan. As for plot supidity, try this on. The SEALS blow a couple of aircraft on East Falkland. Then they attack the Argentinian air base at Rio Grande. They plant 4 hour delayed C-4 charges on some of the aircraft but are spotted by Security. The air base commander knows what happened in the Falklands but does not order an immediate inspection of all of his aircraft. Twelve are destroyed. I know a few Argentinians and they are not stupid. And, by the way, the reason they were spotted is that the air base landing lights came on to accomodate a second landing Hercules as they were making their escape. Earlier however, as they were planting explosives, an Argentinian Hercules turned on to final and the field lights came on. The hero SEAL commander did not have the intelligence to understand that, if it happened once, it would happen again?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Not a terrible read - as long as you ignore the cardboard characters and the lazy writing. There are a huge number of historical and factual errors that Mr. Robinson could easily have corrected with a couple of hours on the Internet. Example: it is widely noted that Georgi Markov, the assassinated Bulgarian dissident, was killed with ricin, not curare. Example, the A-4M Skyhawk was built by McDonnel-Douglas, not Lockheed and if the Fuerza Aerea Argentina was still using them for the conflict in this book, they'd be nigh onto 50 years old. And so on and so on. What rankles isn't an occasional error, but the author's apparent assumption that none of his readers care...so there are many errors. This like won't hurt his sales, but whatever happened to good old-fashioned fact-checking? (I know, the publishers can't afford to do that any more.) Occasional typographical errors don't help much either.
Guest More than 1 year ago
SEALS - SAS - SBS would have used night vision devices . Flashlights would never be used, especially during a night op. A4's are a single engine attack aircraft, not twin engine as described in the assault. Numerous other mistakes relating to military operations.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 2011, at a White House reception Siberian Chief Minister Masorin dies from poisoning at the same time that Russian Prime Minister Kravchenko is building up his Navy and dispatching the new subs around the globe as if the twentieth century Cold War was hot. The military activity and the assassination concern US President Bedford though he hopes it is internal to somehow protect the flow of oil from Siberia to the new deepwater tank terminal in Murmansk before coming to America. Bedford knows the Chinese are the wild card in the Siberian oil sales as their thirst for black gold is immense. --- The Russians send their top submarine Viper 157 armed to the teeth to assist the Argentineans in their attempt to wrest control of the now oil producing Falkland Islands. Argentina makes its grab and the British Royal Navy reacts, but this time unlike the short war three decades ago the Viper 157 is poised to wipe out the British fleet. US Navy Admiral Arnold Morgan and his SEALS mount rescue missions and assist the British who are on the verge of losing control of the Falklands and its oil supply. --- Conspiracy buffs will appreciate Patrick Robinson¿s tense thriller though they will need an inordinate amount of acceptance as much of the adrenalin rush is pumped from improbable scenarios that are never made to seem remotely authentic. Still the action is non-stop and vivid for instance when the SEALS enter the frozen waters off the Falklands, readers will feel just how cold it is due to the stunning descriptions. Mr. Robinson¿s fans will enjoy his latest action-packed tale that appears to defy plausibility yet is fun to read. --- Harriet Klausner