Ghostwritten

Ghostwritten

by David Mitchell
3.8 47

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Overview

Ghostwritten by David Mitchell

By the New York Times bestselling author of The Bone Clocks and Cloud Atlas


A gallery attendant at the Hermitage. A young jazz buff in Tokyo. A crooked British lawyer in Hong Kong. A disc jockey in Manhattan. A physicist in Ireland. An elderly woman running a tea shack in rural China. A cult-controlled terrorist in Okinawa. A musician in London. A transmigrating spirit in Mongolia. What is the common thread of coincidence or destiny that connects the lives of these nine souls in nine far-flung countries, stretching across the globe from east to west? What pattern do their linked fates form through time and space?

A writer of pyrotechnic virtuosity and profound compassion, a mind to which nothing human is alien, David Mitchell spins genres, cultures, and ideas like gossamer threads around and through these nine linked stories. Many forces bind these lives, but at root all involve the same universal longing for connection and transcendence, an axis of commonality that leads in two directions—to creation and to destruction. In the end, as lives converge with a fearful symmetry, Ghostwritten comes full circle, to a point at which a familiar idea—that whether the planet is vast or small is merely a matter of perspective—strikes home with the force of a new revelation. It marks the debut of a writer of astonishing gifts.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307426024
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/18/2007
Series: Vintage Contemporaries
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 448
Sales rank: 173,350
File size: 2 MB

About the Author

David Mitchell is the award-winning and bestselling author of Slade House, The Bone Clocks, The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, Black Swan Green, Cloud Atlas, Number9Dream, andGhostwritten. Twice shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, Mitchell was named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time in 2007. With KA Yoshida, Mitchell translated from the Japanese the internationally bestselling memoir The Reason I Jump. He lives in Ireland with his wife and two children.

Customer Reviews

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Ghostwritten 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 47 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I literally have no idea what I just read. None of the individual character stories were very interesting to me, but I forced myself to continue reading - hoping it would come together later, as Cloud Atlas did. I WAS SORELY DISSAPPINTED. I just finished and feel like I wasted my time. I suppose there is the chance that it went over my head and I failed to understand some greater meaning - but I missed the point entirely. I thoroughly enjoyed Cloud Atlas, which I read first, and that was fairly complicated and I loved it, so I just don't know if it was me or if the book just stunk. I vote stinky.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'd love to loan this out to my friends, but fear I wouldn't get it back. Fabulous writing. Plotting so tight you're not aware it's happening. Draws on a range of experiences and a depth of knowledge that should be impossible at his age. Perhaps Mr. Mitchell is the reincarnation of a past great writer.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I discovered Don Delillo not too long ago with White Noise, I was pleased to find that this great author was not new by any means, only new to me. This meant that there were many other books of his out there that I could look into. Such is not the case with David Mitchell though, as GhostWritten is his first novel (although you wouldn't know it upon reading it). He seems too polished and talented for this to be his first book. I now wish all the books that I read were written by him. I was amazed at just how good this book was, and like AHWOSG by Eggers, it just got better and better the further you read. I loved it and would recommend it to anyone, regardless of tastes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book and enjoyed it very much and then read the reviews here and realized I completely missed the reoccuring symbolism and other 'writerly devices.' I read the book just as an interesting book and enjoyed it very much, especially the section set in China, which functions very well as an unique view of the events that have taken place in China's history. I also enjoyed seeing how the characters all inter-related. My only con was that I felt, to truly understand the book deeply, you would have to read it with a fine tooth comb, which would be very well suited for a modern lit college class, but not for reading for enjoyment. I think this would be a more enjoyable book the second time around, but I was not overly tempted to start the book all over again. My rec is to buy this if you want to work through your read, not sleep through it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This collection of shortstories defies categorisation. The cover reviews talk about cyberpunk, but I have no idea what that means. To me, this a book in an old-fashioned and tried and trusted tradition of great storytelling. Characters are fantastically rich, and the references to Eastern mythology add greatly to this work. A simply tremendous book.
cloggiedownunder More than 1 year ago
Ghostwritten is the first novel by British author, David Mitchell. Told by nine different narrators, with a plot spanning centuries and continents, this is an amazing debut novel. The narrators are a member of a doomsday cult who releases poison gas in a subway in Tokyo, and details his retreat to Okinawa and a small nearby island, Kume-jima; a jazz aficionado who works as a sales clerk in a Tokyo music store; a lawyer in a financial institution in Hong Kong who has been moving large sums of money from a certain account; a woman who owns a Tea Shack on China's Holy Mountain and speaks to a tree; a non-corporeal sentient entity which is searching for who or what it is; a gallery attendant in Petersburg who is involved in an art theft scam; a ghostwriter/drummer living in London who saves a woman from being run over by a taxi; an Irish nuclear physicist who quits her job when she finds her research is being used for military purposes; and a late night radio talkback DJ who finds himself fielding calls from an intriguing caller referring to himself as the zookeeper. Mitchell weaves together these nine narrations into a cohesive whole with vague or occasionally direct references to a myriad of common themes, characters, objects, or words (including, but not limited to, albino conger eels, camphor trees, an earth-bound comet, Kilmagoon whiskey, jazz music, cleaning toilets and artificial intelligence) in each narration. His characters muse on, ponder and articulate on various themes: love/lust; chance/fate; brainwashing; propaganda; one's own place in the world; why we are who we are; principles; and the character of London Underground Lines; There is humour, irony, intrigue, and a plentiful helping of tongue-in-cheek comments. And when Mo Muntervary tells Father Wally “Phenomena are interconnected regardless of distance, in a holistic ocean more voodoo than Newton”, she could be describing Mitchell’s own love affair with connections: fans of Mitchell's work will also recognise certain characters and concepts from his other novels, in particular, Cloud Atlas, Black Swan Green and number9dream. This is a brilliant debut novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Best book I have read in a long time. It's bound to become a classic. As I read chapter after chapter I kept thinking, where does this guy get this stuff from? Totally amazing. Fresh, different and to the point. Right up to the minute. The perfect start to a new millenium. Now on my second read and its even better...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
donnareads911 More than 1 year ago
The reviews claim this is "gracefully plotted", a "marvelous puzzle", or a "well-crafted relief map". Truly, more like "plodded", a puzzle that's missing pieces, lots of pieces, and a relief map? More like a map to nowhere, and a relief that the book was done! I really was looking forward to finding out what this special destiny was, or how the puzzle would come together. Time to sweep these pieces in a box and recycle...
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 2005, I read Cloud Atlas. I enjoyed this book as much - they are really good stories that I did not want to finish. The inter-relationships of the stories are fascinating. I have become a David Mitchell fan.
Anonymous 8 days ago
Words cannot do justice to this amazing book. Read it for yourself.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mitchell gets you hooked right¿ away even when not having an idea where this novel is taking you. It takes you to many parts of this world. Superbly written. Witty, soul searching and entertaining.
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Some good moments, but mostly a disappointment compared with "Cloud Atlas," which I read first.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has anti-consumer DRM. You will be prevented from reading it on a non-Nook reader, DO NOT BUY.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago