Girl in Blue

Girl in Blue

by Ann Rinaldi
4.4 50

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Girl in Blue 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book when I was 12 and I still like it at 14. The beginning brings the reader into Sarah's world and brings them up to date on everything that is happening in her life. It sets a very good historical background, making sure the reader knows that this novel is set during the Civil War. Then Ann Rinaldi takes the reader on a whirlwind journey that takes a turn in the middle of the book that I didn't expect. Finally, she neatly ties up the ending, but also leaves us wanting more. I have read this book about five times and each time I have found something different to enjoy. I would recommend this book to someone who loves history but also people who are thirsting for a bit of adventure, through a teenager's eyes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book rocks. I don't usuasally like to read, but this book made me think differently. I read the book in three days, books that long usally take me at least a week to read. It is so suspenseful. You don't know whats going to happen until it happens. I am going to tell my teacher about this so the next 8th grade class can read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story of family, comradship, and love is one of the best I've ever read! Worth every penny! Ann Rinaldi has done it again, I recommend her to even those who don't usually like history.
carlyt More than 1 year ago
Although the path is usually dark, there is always a light at the end for Sarah. This book has many true historical facts, but has several twists that make it fun to read. I give Girl in Blue four stars, for sixth grade readers and up, because it is an easy but exciting and informing book. Girl in Blue is set during the civil war, when the army was recruiting anyone who would join. When I read a book it needs to catch me in the first or second chapter, and this one did the trick. Sarah Wheelock, a sixteen-year-old girl from Michigan ran away from home to avoid being wed to her disgusting neighbor. She decided to go all out and join the 2nd Michigan army. She cut her hair and disguised herself as a man, only to be discovered as a woman after only a month. "She felt herself collapsing" were the words used to describe Sarah's feelings when she was discovered, but instead of going to jail, she was sent to be a woman spy with a famous detective agency. Even now her adventure had just begun. When thinking of the Civil War, I think of Virginia and Washington D.C. Sarah's house was located in Michigan. This twist makes you realized that the war effected everyone. Along the way, Sarah met several people who were from all different places; not just Virginia and Michigan. The fact that she would risk her life to get away from a man just shows how brutal times were back then. This story is an entertainer as well as an informer, but you'll never know you are learning. The history in this book was organized in such a way that I became part of the story; unlike other books I have read that just throw facts at you. The four stars that I give this book were well earned. Although this book was excellent, it needs suspense. After reading it once I would not go back and read it again because it would spoil the surprises woven into the plot. Off to the army, then to be a spy, then what? Girl in Blue is a great and exciting story for almost anyone.
Ravenrocks More than 1 year ago
This is one of the best books i have ever read. I love how sassy Sarah is. I would defiantly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
It is 1861 and Sarah Louisa Wheelock, age fifteen, lives on a farm near Casey’s Mill, MI, with her father, mother, sister Betsy, and brother Ben. Her older sister Clarice is married. She has learned to hunt and ride better than any boy. Their abusive father, who beats both Sarah and her mother, plans to wed Sarah to their odious neighbor, Ezekiel Kunkle, who is a widower with two children. So she runs away, dresses as a boy named Neddie Compton, and joins the Union Army. As Neddy Sarah is sent to Washington, DC, but after the first Battle of Bull Run she is discovered. However, obviously being good at disguising herself and acting a part, she is recruited by Allan Pinkerton to serve as a maid in the home of the notorious Southern spy Rose Greenhow to help with surveillance and see if she can find out how Rose is sending messages. She begins to fall in love with Lt. Sheldon, head of the surveillance team, but then has reason to believe that he might be a traitor. Will her position be compromised so that she is found out again? And what should she do about Sheldon? How weird is this! I obtain different books from different sources at different times and in different places and then put them in different piles to be read on different occasions. So the books that I am reading at any particular point are the result of happenstance. Back in 2011, I picked up some young people’s Civil War fiction books while visiting in Gettysburg, one of which, No Girls Allowed by Alan Kay, is a completely fictional account of a girl who dresses as a boy to fight in the Union Army. I just recently started reading it, but before I finished it, I began another book entitled A Soldier’s Secret by Marissa Moss which had been sent to me early in 2012 by the publisher for review and is a fictionalized account of the life of Sarah Edmonds who dressed as a boy to fight in the Union Army. Then before I finished that, I began reading Rinaldi’s book which I had actually first seen in a 2006 Scholastic Book catalogue and then bought later in 2012 at Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield Park near Springfield, MO. Rinaldi writes, “While Sarah Wheelock is a character of my own invention, I have based her somewhat on ‘Franklin Thompson,’ the male alias for Sarah Emma Edmonds, one of the most famous male soldier impersonators in the Civil War.” There is enough similarity so that having read A Soldier’s Secret I was immediately able to recognize the resemblances, but Rinaldi’s story is much more fictionalized, with changed names and many plot differences. Girl in Blue is well written and easy to read. It has fewer objectionable elements than Moss’s book, omitting the euphemistic sexual references to male anatomy. However, while it is listed for ages eight and above, the “d” and “h” words are both used occasionally, the terms “God” and “Lord” are sometimes found as interjections, there are several instances of drinking beer, whiskey, and wine, and a few of the fighting scenes are a little intense with some gory detail. Therefore, I would recommend it for ages twelve and above. Rinaldi writes concerning the real Sarah Edmonds, “Her tenure in the army was longer than my Sarah’s, and she never served with the Pinkerton detective agency,” and said, “I have invented all the rest of the characters, with the exception of Abraham Lincoln, General McClellan, Doctor Hammond, Allan Pinkerton and his operatives, and Rose Greenhow and the women spies incarcerated with her at Fort Greenhow.” While a couple of reader reviewers felt that the novel doesn't measure up to other Ann Rinaldi books and is not her best work, they still agreed that it is a suspenseful historical fiction story with a bit of adventure and a dash of romance. Amelia's War is another Civil War historical by Rinaldi.
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clemmy More than 1 year ago
Sarah Wheelock is awesome. Very few people would have the nerve to enter the military, much less become a Union spy after you've been found out. Sarah is spunky and clear-headed. She is very responsible and easily respected. I have read this book multiple times, and it never gets old. For those with a romantic bent, I will save you from yourself; she does not end up with a guy, but the ending is positive, and Sarah is the kind of character you can trust to find a man on her own.
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Beenabug1 More than 1 year ago
Good Historical Read. Has a lot of facts behind it but adds life to the history and the scenes. Never boring and has a few small twists and turns through the story. Is not meant to be a challenging read but is a very good enjoyable one. Rinaldi out did herself with this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
i was so mad when se was falling for sheldon i thought the dockterwas better i was so happpy when he turned out to be the bad guy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was so good! The first time I read it I wasn't really sure because I'm more into the American Revolution but then I just read it again and I was like WOW! It's such an amazing book and you won't want to put it down!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an amazing book! I have read it like three times and it doesn't get old. The story keeps you on the edge of your seat till the very end. Highly Recomended!!!