Glass Houses (Chief Inspector Gamache Series #13)

Glass Houses (Chief Inspector Gamache Series #13)

by Louise Penny
4.7 50

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Glass Houses (Chief Inspector Gamache Series #13) 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 50 reviews.
Anonymous 11 months ago
I have loved each of the Inspector Gamache series. They are so riveting that I have trouble putting them down. Glass Houses is no exception. I enjoyed the way the readers are led scene by scene to the truth and eventual solving of the mystery. Penny is gifted in giving the readers enough juicy details to keep them on the edge of their seats. I can't wait for number 14, until then I will wonder how they are all doing and will miss them like good friends that live far away. Thank you.
Anonymous 10 months ago
This book is an excellent entry in a remarkable series. Her writing is masterful. The characters feel real, the mysteries are smart and intense, and the pacing is smooth. The dialogue is natural. As with her other books, Penny weaves a lot of threads into a complicated but beautiful pattern. Once started, it's hard to stop reading it. There is drama, action, mystery, humor, and wit. If you are a fan of Louise Penny's "Chief Inspector Gamache" series, then I believe you would also enjoy Craig Johnson's "Longmire" series. There may be a vast difference between Absaroka County and the Province of Quebec, but I think Sheriff Longmire and Chief Gamache are cut from the same cloth. They are both men of honor, fiercely intelligent, loyal, kind, and tough. I can picture Walt, Henry, and Gamache sitting together, having a drink, and truly enjoying each others' company. The meeting of Jean-Guy and Vic would probably be memorable, too!
Anonymous 11 months ago
I loved this book. I had a hard time putting it down. This is a wonderful series,
Anonymous 8 months ago
Besides being a great mystery story , I always learn about something new and different in Louise Penny's books and this one was no exception. She can always be counted on to have some intriguing aspect in her stories that I research after finishing the book. Can't wait for the next one!
Anonymous 11 months ago
Great plotting device, using a trial as the backdrop for a case that has its roots in the past. Interesting injection of new cultural information. Well done!
Anonymous 11 months ago
I'll be thinking long and hard about the issues Penny through her characters raises in this powerful compelling read - what extremes will be required to combat opioids and is there a higher law? No easy answers in these politically turbulent times but a lot to weigh - and so great to visit again with the quirky, relatable individuals of Three Pines I wished I knew in real life!
Anonymous 6 months ago
Good continuation of a fascinating series.
Anonymous 7 months ago
Having all the friends together again was wonderful for me. This story brought their love for each other out front or should I say in focus for all to see. Really special.
Anonymous 11 months ago
Beautifully written...a real page turner, and deeply thought provoking.
Anonymous 11 months ago
This one could stand alone without reading the others but it is even better if you have
Anonymous 6 months ago
Louise Penny has hit another home run with this book. The story, the characters, the community, not only keep you turning pages long after the lights should go out, but make you want to live among them to share the love and camaraderie. Can’t wait for the next Gamache.
Anonymous 6 months ago
I still want more Armand and Three Pines
Deb-Krenzer 7 months ago
Wow, how in the heck have I come this far in my life and never read Louise Penny before? I've known for a while that she has quite the following. And now, . . . I know why. Good Grief this was a great read for me. I spent three quarters of this book immersed in a trial without even knowing who the defendant was, or even if they were female or male. The story went from present to back history to a little further back history, then like six months before and then back to the trial, then like a month before. I mean it was jumping all over the place. And I absolutely loved the characters in Three Pines. Especially the VERY quirky ones. Ha!! Even though this was number 13 in the series of Armand Gamache, I still felt like I hadn't missed anything. I mean in the sense that I know there were other things that happened prior to this book, but I didn't feel as though I missed out on anything!!! I know I am preaching to the choir when I say that I was so mesmerized by this book. It did go back and forth a lot, and being an advanced reader, it was hard to keep up as I had to stop for a few seconds and wonder where I was but that did not deter me, AT ALL!!!!!! If you have not read Louise Penny, don't take as long as I did to figure out that it's an excellent read. Thoroughly enjoyed this book, laughed quite a few times and was definitely shedding some tears at the end. I grew to love these characters and really miss them now that I've left Three Pines. Thanks to St. Martin's Press and Net Galley for providing me with a free e-galley in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Exquisite
Anonymous 8 months ago
One of the best in awhile and perhaps my favorite. Just finished, so I need to tnink about it.
Anonymous 8 months ago
Classic Gamache and company. Can't wait for the next.
gloriafeit 9 months ago
From the publisher: When a mysterious figure appears on the village green on a cold November day in Three Pines, Chief Inspector Gamache, who now resides there, knows something is wrong. Yet since no laws are being broken, he does nothing. But a shadow falls over Three Pines, and unease sets into the community. Soon the figure disappears, and not long after, a body is discovered. During the ensuing investigation and later, when a trial begins against the accused, Gamache considers the events he set into motion long ago, disastrous means to an uncertain end, and if there will be a reckoning. “This case began in a higher court,” he says at his testimony. “And it’s going to end there.” And regardless of the trial’s outcome, Gamache understands that in the end, he will have to face his conscience. A gripping and haunting mystery, “Glass Houses” explores what Gandhi called the court of conscience and asks us, when the chips are down, is there a court that supersedes all? This is the 12th book in the series, all of which take place in and around the aforementioned Quebec village of Three Pines, variously described as lost, hidden in the hills, and not on any map or GPS, in the middle of nowhere, and a place where “getting lost was almost a prerequisite for finding the place.” All the residents of the village are present, and the many fans of the series will welcome them: Gamache, former Chief Inspector of the Surete, a post now held by Isabella Lacoste, Gamache now the Superintendent, heading up the division that oversees Homicide and Serious Crimes; his wife, Reine-Marie; Myrna, a large black woman who runs a new and used bookstore and was once a prominent psychologist in Montreal [referred to by others in the novel as “a verbal speed bump”]; Ruth Zardo, an eccentric, award-winning and “demented old” poet, and Rosa, her beloved pet duck; Gabri and Olivier, the lovers who run the bistro and the B&B; Monsieur Beliveau, the grocer; Clara Morrow, an artist and portraitist; as well as Henri, Gamache's German shepherd; Jean-Guy Beauvoir, second in command in the Surete [formerly Gamache's second in command] and now married to his daughter; and Madeleine Toussaint, the first woman in charge of Serious Crimes and the first Haitian to head up any department. Three Pines, and its residents, remain as charming as ever. Shortly after the book opens, a trial is about to begin, the defendant being accused of the above-mentioned murder, Gamache being a key witness, the judge one Maureen Corriveau, handling her first murder case, a murder which seemingly had no motive behind it. The identity of the defendant is withheld from the reader until much later in the novel. The villain in the piece, a figure known as “the cobrador,” is a fascinating creation, apparently with its origin in Spain, in fact a Spanish debt collector, who followed and shamed people into paying their debts. Thee is much here that is timely, dealing as it does with issues of drug/opiod use/abuse [present in our newspapers on almost a daily basis], and political corruption, among other things of national importance today. As always the writing is never less than elegant, and the book is recommended.
Anonymous 9 months ago
Excellent. I have enjoyed all Louise Penny's novels. Her characters are memorable. I lose myself in her stories.
Anonymous 10 months ago
Three Pines will always be a dream.
Anonymous 10 months ago
Anonymous 10 months ago
So wonderful to visit Three Pines again. Wish I could have stayed longer.
Anonymous 9 days ago
Anonymous 11 days ago
It’s been fun to watch these books improve as Ms. Penny hones her craft. Book #12 was riveting, and I was concerned at how she could possibly follow up from that. Well, she did.
Anonymous 16 days ago
I am always truly immersed in Three Pines and all of the characters. The story is both gripping, wanting more, and yet pulling at your heartstrings. Always eager to turn the next page, I find it difficult to put the book down. I am eagerly awaiting the next one!
Delphimo 4 months ago
Louise Penny tells a moving story with eloquent language and heart-rending emotion. This story deals with conscience for your deeds and people void of any conscience. The village of Three Pines harbors a brutal killer, but the authorities cannot determine a motive. Gamache and his select team rush to complete a sting of the drug lords and find the murderer in Three Pines. Are the two projects connected? Louise Penny creates multi-dimensional characters and a sweeping setting. The story seesaws between the past and the current trial of the murderer, but the reader does not know who sits in the defender's seat until the end of the book. My favorite characters, besides Gamache, are Ruth and Clara. These two women possess the heart of the community.