Glasshouse

Glasshouse

by Charles Stross
4.0 30

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Overview

Glasshouse by Charles Stross

In the twenty-seventh century, accelerated technology dictates the memories and personalities of people. With most of his own memories deleted, Robin enters The Glasshouse-an experimental polity where he finds himself at the mercy of his own unbalanced psyche.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101208595
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 06/27/2006
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 352
Sales rank: 318,670
File size: 427 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Charles Stross was born in Leeds, England in 1964. He holds degrees in pharmacy and computer science, and has worked in a variety of jobs including pharmacist, technical author, software engineer, and freelance journalist. He is now a full-time writer.

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Glasshouse 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 30 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great book. Something I have been yearning for--a strong story, unusual ideas, interesting people. An author worth grabbing on to. Thoughtful, thought provoking
Anonymous 11 months ago
I read this book for its gender bending, body swapping, excitement and I got it. In spades. Written in the tradition of Jack Chalker, it effortlessly wove these together with some hard scifi. There were times I admit when the vocabulary and narrative were a little confusing, but the overall narrative was so well written and effortlessly wove everything together that by the end I just had to sigh...wow!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Started off so strong! But lost me in the last quarter of the story, which seemed almost unrelated to what had come before.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Made me think. Introduces an interesting idea of immortality and existence in general. Really, really enjoyed it.
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hls1966 More than 1 year ago
This book does what all good science fiction does. Makes you THINK! And to enjoy this book, you do have to think quite a bit while you're reading. It's not an easy read, but it is worth the work. If you consider how our modern lives are "in the cloud" (online backup, sync, sharing, social networking), we've already begun living our digital lives in this world.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I didn't think I would enjoy this book, but it was pretty good. Not great, but pretty good. Strong statements are made regarding proprietary file formats and how this will effect the future's view of us. The author leads you down the dark discovery of the hero's past. He questions if evil actions, even during war time, make one evil. And, if you don't remember these evil actions, are you still the same person? A good look into how memory and thought shape our lives with a strong plot with few holes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
SteveTheDM More than 1 year ago
This was a really fascinating book. Stross has managed to create a setting that looks back at 1950s to 1990s culture from the perspective of far-future humanity. That juxtaposition of world views makes for a rich set of conflicts, and the book really shines when those conflicts are the subject at hand. Intertwined with that is mixed a plot of the aftereffects of a viral-based information war actually set in that far-future humanity. The culture shock portions of the novel are by far the best. Characterization is wonderful, and there is lots of humor to be had in those crazy things historical humans used to do. The war stuff was not nearly as good. Unfortunately, that really hurts the end of the book, where the two plots twist together. You get the feeling Stross may have felt the same way, because the ending seems very rushed. 4 of 5 stars.
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