God and the Welfare State

God and the Welfare State

by Lew Daly

Paperback(Reprint)

$35.00
View All Available Formats & Editions
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Wednesday, April 24

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780262533898
Publisher: MIT Press
Publication date: 12/16/2016
Series: Boston Review Books
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 154
Product dimensions: 4.50(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Lew Daly is an independent scholar who lives in New York City. He studied religious ethics at Union Theological Seminary and has worked as a prison chaplain.

What People are Saying About This

Bill Moyers

As the Religious Right speaks with denunciatory dogma and grows all the more shrill and the Religious Left whispers feebly back, Lew Daly offers a fresh and original way to think about democracy, politics, and religion when thinking has just about disappeared from the discourse. Pay attention: there is hope here.

Endorsement

As the Religious Right speaks with denunciatory dogma and grows all the more shrill and the Religious Left whispers feebly back, Lew Daly offers a fresh and original way to think about democracy, politics, and religion when thinking has just about disappeared from the discourse. Pay attention: there is hope here.

Bill Moyers

From the Publisher

As the Religious Right speaks with denunciatory dogma and grows all the more shrill and the Religious Left whispers feebly back, Lew Daly offers a fresh and original way to think about democracy, politics, and religion when thinking has just about disappeared from the discourse. Pay attention: there is hope here.

Bill Moyers

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lew Daly cuts through a lot of fruitless posturing on the right and left to look at the intellectual roots of George W. Bush's much-maligned faith-based initiative. People who care about policy will find a fascinating story here of how Catholic and Calvinist ideas about the state have come to play a central role in the evolving history of welfare reform. Daly convincingly argues that the church-state challenge of the faith-based initiative is much more serious, and plausible, than liberal opponents think. For religious readers, Daly lucidly exposes the 'bad faith' of the faith-based initiative. The focus on helping religious providers, even if one were to accept the theory behind it (and Daly mainly does), is not any kind of anti-poverty policy. It's a policy about the state and its role in society, with only a hypothetical connection to the goal of reducing poverty--the unproven (and barely tested) hypothesis being that more religion in the social safety net will solve more problems.