The Godfather of Kathmandu (Sonchai Jitpleecheep Series #4)

The Godfather of Kathmandu (Sonchai Jitpleecheep Series #4)

by John Burdett
4.0 37

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The Godfather of Kathmandu (Sonchai Jitpleecheep Series #4) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
To summarize this novel is a challenge beyond me, so suffice it to say that I have read Burdett's other novels involving Sonchai Jitpleecheep and was at first put off by Burdett's opening pages. Only when the action shifted from Nepal to Bangkok was I back in familiar territory, and then I was along for the ride. In retrospect, the first 70 pages or so are meant to weed out any one not serious about going along on this tale of mystic spirituality and corruption. Yet I felt highly rewarded for sticking with it, and cannot imagine the mind that created all of this intrigue and madness. So, I do recommend that you trust yourself to Burdett, and take it on faith that you will be satisfied. But, that's only if you read the whole book.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In Bangkok Colonel Vikorn assigns his willing subordinate Royal Thai Police Detective Sonchai Jitpleecheep to protect his illegal kickbacks and recent major drug purchase from Nepal from his allegedly as avaricious boss General Zinna. However, as they work the counter attacks to bring down the vicious General, a nasty homicide occurs that forces the Buddhist sleuth to investigate. Someone killed Hollywood director Frank Charles who regularly visited Thailand to enjoy sexual pleasures. The victim was sliced and diced and apparently his brains dined a la The Silence of the Lambs. At the same time he struggles with making progress in the investigation that has global interest, Sonchai has issues with wife who has left him to become a nun since their offspring died, the actress Tara of Tantric fame, and the amazing criminal Dr. Moi. All that aside, it is being Vikorn's consigliore to the man's Godfather that has him mentally counting cash. His enlightened Tibetan guru Doctor Norbu Tietsin insists the Godfather loot is irrelevant when the Tibetan invasion of China one thought at a time is almost as crucial as selling his stash of heroin. This is an insane Thailand police procedural that feels like Elmore Leonard gave guidance to John Burdett. Unlike the previous Bangkok cases starring the felonious cop Sonchai (see Bangkok Haunts, Bangkok 8 and Bangkok Tattoo); the star's personal life overwhelms the investigation. Still this is a very enjoyable tale as Sonchai knows he made on major error in judgment when he gave his superior the Godfather DVDs. Harriet Klausner
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Camboron More than 1 year ago
While this latest Sonchai detective story was not as cohesive as the first three, and a little scattered in terms of its multiple storylines, it was still a satisfying whodunit. The dark humor of the series was just as plentiful as before, and there many chuckles to be had. Especially: Vikorn's ecological rationale for selling smack to Americans, how intuition reduces paperwork, comments on the British empire, and Sukun trying to be inconspicuous. It was also fun to see Sonchai bested spiritually by some Tibetans, although, when it comes to women, he is usually as capable as the three boys from the WoT series. There were a couple of things that brought down my esteem of this latest mystery. One was the repetition of certain details that always crop up throughout the series: the mentioning of the special food stalls that open up when the girls get off work, the commentary of seeing all the abandoned building while riding the elevated tramway, the kid with the broken windshield wiper, "there was a ship in the way," Zegna/Givenchy/Baker-Benjes ensemble, reptilian incarnations trapping one in sexual jealousy, etc. Also, annoying was the handling of exposition/recap of the previous books, such as Sonchai's explanation of his beliefs to Vikorn, Sonchai's incorruptible aspirations, "I surprised him with my total recall of the event", his "father" Traffaut, etc. I can understand needing some sort of perspective for a series, if you've picked up in the middle, but I've never understood why anyone would want to read only part of a series. Also, I like to re-read books, or read a web synopsis to refresh my memory. That's why I've never understood why it's in books. At least, the author is not recapping things from the actual novel that's being read, like Ken Follett likes to do. My co-worker tells me that I am abnormal, in reading books back-to-back, as frequently as I do, and other people need the refresher. So, I guess you can disregard this whole paragraph. Anyhoo, if you like the series, then you will like this book. Sonchai is admittedly more of a consigliore than a detective, but he still likes to solve the crime, even if he can't do anything about it. When Sonchai admits this, it's a reminder of the underlying reason to read the series. Behind the wicked humor, and the dark mysteries from book to book, lies Sonchai's spiritual journey to become a good Buddhist.
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Emmalini More than 1 year ago
This is a fabulous book without question. The characters are compelling and the story line is logical. You'll also learn quite a bit about Thai culture. I heartily recommend this series for those who enjoy mystery and intrigue.
Tigerpaw70 More than 1 year ago
Book 4 in the Sonchai Jitpleecheep series The writer's speciality is to take his readers on an exotic and mysterious jaunt exploring the back streets of Bangkok where sex is a marketable commodity. He drags us into a culture unknown to many with his observations of the drug trade and official corruption. He also touches through his protagonist the religious customs of Tibetan Buddhism. As the book opens, Sonchai is struggling with the loss of his son and is depending more and more on a mixture of drugs and Buddhism to carry on his day to day life. Nevertheless he takes on the case of Frank Charles, a famous film director, murdered in a gruesome manner at a local flophouse. Meanwhile, Sonchai's boss, Colonel Vikorn, is drawn into an alliance with his arch rival officer Zinna in one of the biggest drug deals to date. He appoints Sonchai as his trusted "Consigliere" to assist him in his dealings and on various errands. The word on the street between drug mules leads Sonchai to Kathmandu where he falls under the influence of his mantra and is smitten by Tara, a beautiful Tibetan Buddhist refugee. Eventually he returns to Bangkok and retargets his efforts to the Frank Charles investigation, finding the cause of death and the true culprit becomes a priority... Sonchai narrates many of his thoughts in the first person and shares them with his "farang" (western reader) as though the reader was his guardian angel. He also purveys a rather cynical tone and switches between the present and the past tense. His character is well-crafted, a rather unique, unusual and bizarre detective. The story is written with the intricacies of crime and the culture and seasoned with a vivid description of food, sights and the sounds of a vibrant city. The plot is meaty although I found the style to be challenging with its many surprises that continually jockey for the readers' attention. To enjoy this series depends strongly on personal taste; I find I am slowly losing interest.
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