God's Signature: Understanding Paul Beauchamp on Creation in the First Testament

God's Signature: Understanding Paul Beauchamp on Creation in the First Testament

by JR Pambrun

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9789042933941
Publisher: Peeters Publishing
Publication date: 04/01/2018
Series: Terra Nova Series , #3
Pages: 743
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)

About the Author

James Pambrun is Professor Emeritus, Faculty of Theology, Saint Paul University / Université Saint-Paul, Ottawa, Canada, where he taught systematic theology. His research explores foundational and methodological questions in theology, particularly in the area of theological hermeneutics.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Part I Methodological Considerations and the Classes OF Writings 15

Chapter 1 Systematic Theology and the Question of Creation in Scripture 17

1.1 A Theological Encounter with the Scholarship of Modern Science 18

1.1.1 Crafting Theological Inquiry: The Emergence of a Hermeneutical Form 20

1.1.2 On Behalf of Crafting a Form of Inquiry 26

1.2 The Encounter between Systematics and Exegesis 33

1.2.1 Historical Consciousness 34

1.2.2 The Act of Understanding 39

1.3 Richard Clifford's Insight and Moving towards Paul Beauchamp 41

Chapter 2 Scripture as a "Book" and the Organization of Meaning 49

2.1 The Classes of Writings and the Surface of the Text 49

2.2 Properties of Acts of Meaning in the Classes 56

2.3 The Speculative Moment and the Classes 59

2.4 La Deutérose as a Speculative Wisdom Moment 62

Chapter 3 La Deutérose as a Speculative Mode 73

3.1 Deuteronomy and the Law 73

3.2 Proverbs and Wisdom 77

3.3 Deutero-Isaiah and the Prophets 78

3.4 La Deutérose and the Modes of Time 82

3.5 The Encounter among the Classes of Writings 86

3.6 Concluding Remarks 93

Chapter 4 The Telos of Meaning and the Book: The Impact of the Exile 99

4.1 The Telos of Meaning and the Role of an Ending 101

4.2 Apocalyptic Discourse and the Meaning of an Ending 102

4.3 The Role of the Reader and the Meaning of an Ending 106

4.4 The Act of Writing and the Role of an Ending 112

4.5 The Exile and the Act of Writing 117

Chapter 5 Figurative Interpretation and Narrative 131

5.1 Figure and Operations of Meaning 131

5.2 The Eschatological Character of the Figure 142

5.3 From Figures to Narratives 145

5.4 General Features Regarding the Role of Narrative 150

Chapter 6 Covenant and Narrative 157

6.1 Covenant 158

6.2 Complexity of Levels of Narrative 169

Part II Classical Creation Texts and the Classes of Writings 181

Chapter 7 Transition to Classical Creation Texts 183

7.1 Creation and the World of Meaning 184

7.2 Word and Body 191

Chapter 8 Deutero-Isaiah I: The Emergence of the Notion of Creation 201

8.1 Deutero-Isaiah and the Systematic Form of Creation 201

8.2 Transpositions in Meaning 209

8.3 Encounter Effected by the Module Narratif 215

8.3.1 Father-Son 215

8.3.2 Israel and the Stranger 218

8.3.3 The Individual apart from the Group 223

8.4 The Emergence of the Figure of the Single Individual 226

8.5 The Emergence of a Language of Creation 231

Chapter 9 Deutero-Isaiah II: Creation and the Surplus of Meaning 237

9.1 The Figure of the Suffering Servant and the Augment of Meaning 237

9.2 Voices in the Text - The Fourth Suffering Servant Poem 238

9.3 Who Is the Servant? 241

9.4 The Symmetry among the Levels of Narrative 244

9.5 Engendering a New People 250

9.6 The Significance of Food and the Recognition of the Other 256

9.7 Concluding Remarks 260

Chapter 10 From Deutero-Isaiah to Genesis 1 263

10.1 Tire Openness to the Future and the Present of Historical Existence 269

10.2 Refiguring the Past I: The Use of Figures 272

10.3 On Aesthetic Meaning 279

10.4 Refiguring the Past II: Figures and Narrative 289

10.5 Le Deutéronomisme and the Closure of the Pentateuch 296

10.6 Deepening the Meaning of the Law - A Second Law 300

10.7 The Second Law as a New Form of History 302

Chapter 11 Genesis 1:1 - 2:4a: Semantic Considerations Regarding the Cosmological Literary Form 313

11.1 Approaching the Text 313

11.2 The Significance of the Formules-cadre 323

11.3 Reinforcing the Priority of "God Said" 327

11.4 The Significance of Day Four 331

11.4.1 The Structure of Day Four 333

11.5 The Creation Narrative and Interpretation at the Measure of One's Age 340

11.5.1 The Nature of the Act of Creation 342

11.5.2 The Import of Light and the Separation of the Heavens 345

Chapter 12 The World of the Text: An Excursus 359

12.1 In View of the Self-Organization of the People 359

12.2 The Organization of the People 368

12.3 The Significance of an Excursus on Chronicles for Reading Genesis 1:1 - 2:4a 375

12.3.1 The Cosmological Form - Heaven and Earth and All Their Army 376

12.3.2 The Levitical Class and the Self understanding of the People 380

Chapter 13 The Experience of Creation 391

13.1 Admiration 394

13.1.1 To Separate / Séparer 395

13.1.2 Time / Le temps 399

13.1.3 The Word / La Parole 405

13.2 The Significance of the Narrative Character of the Text 410

13.3 Humanity in the Image and Likeness of God: The Import of Day Six 416

13.4 An Inventory of References to Humanity in Création et séparation 418

13.4.1 With Respect to the Formules-cadre 418

13.4.2 Structural Divisions 420

13.4.3 Action 422

13.4.4 The Distributive Force of God's Word 424

13.5 Concluding Remarks 426

Chapter 14 Humanity in the Image and Likeness of God: The Import of Genesis 9 for Genesis 1 431

14.1 The Reference to Food 433

14.2 The Logic of "Have Dominion" and "Subdue" 436

14.3 Uncovering the Dialectic in the Image of God 441

14.4 Genesis 9:1-7 and the Image of God 446

14.5 The Image of God and the Hope of a New Humanity 454

14.6 Concluding Remarks 467

Chapter 15 Wisdom and the Act of Reading 469

15.1 From the Law and the Prophets to Wisdom 469

15.2 The Scribe, the Reader, and the Act of Reading 485

Chapter 16 The Mediation of the Self: Word and Body 499

16.1 The Presence of the Sage to His/Her Own Word 500

16.2 The Presence of the Sage to His/Her Own Body 513

16.3 Concluding Remarks 525

Chapter 17 Wisdom and the Social Mediation of the Self: The Household and the Book 531

17.1 The Experience of a New Self 532

17.2 The Household 538

17.3 The Act of Reading and the Bodiliness of the Book 559

17.3.1 Resonance in the Act of Reading between the Sage and the People 562

17.3.2 The Character of the Book as Testimony - Bodiliness of the People 564

17.3.3 Relation to an Origin in Freedom and in History: Aesthetic and Ethical 567

17.3.4 Presence to Self as Event of Gestation 570

17.4 Concluding Remarks 572

Chapter 18 The Structure of the Poem of Woman Wisdom: The Origin of Engendering Life 577

18.1 Wisdom and the Radicalization of the Meaning of Creation 578

18.2 The Structure of the Text 588

18.3 Wisdom, Nature and Israel's Encounter with the Nations 604

Chapter 19 The House That Wisdom Built 611

19.1 "Delight to Be among the Children of Humanity," or Who Is Humanity? 613

19.2 "I Was There," or the King as Adamic Figure 622

Chapter 20 The Path of Wisdom: Reconciliation and "God's Earth" 647

20.1 The Suffering Servant 650

20.2 Wisdom and Justice: Exchanges 664

20.3 Wisdom and Justice: The Law and Proverbs 8 668

Chapter 21 Encounter, Justice, and Sabbath Time 673

21.1 Narrative and the Meaning of 'God's Earth' 675

21.1.1 Narrative and the Goods of Existence 677

21.1.2 Narrative and Its Relation to Time 678

21.1.3 Narrative and an Experience of an Origin in Us 681

21.2 Narrative and Law as Justice 684

21.2.1 Food, Narrative, and Ritual Meal 688

21.3 The Figure of a New Humanity: Nuptial Sabbath Time 694

Summing Up: From the Origin to the Cross 703

Works Cited 717

Works by Beauchamp 717

Related Works 719

General Works 720

Index 729

Subjects 729

Authors 741

Biblical References 742

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