The Gods Themselves

The Gods Themselves

by Isaac Asimov
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Overview

The Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov

Only a few know the terrifying truth—an outcast Earth scientist, a rebellious alien inhabitant of a dying planet, a lunar-born human intuitionist who senses the imminent annihilation of the Sun. They know the truth—but who will listen? They have foreseen the cost of abundant energy—but who will believe? These few beings, human and alien, hold the key to the Earth's survival.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780345318312
Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
Publication date: 10/12/1984

About the Author

Isaac Asimov began his Foundation series at the age of twenty-one, not realizing that it would one day be considered a cornerstone of science fiction. During his legendary career, Asimov penned more than 470 books on subjects ranging from science to Shakespeare to history, though he was most loved for his award-winning science fiction sagas, which include the Robot, Empire, and Foundation series. Named a Grand Master of Science Fiction by the Science Fiction Writers of America, Asimov entertained and educated readers of all ages for close to five decades. He died, at the age of seventy-two, in April 1992.

Date of Birth:

January 20, 1920

Date of Death:

April 6, 1992

Place of Birth:

Petrovichi, Russia

Place of Death:

New York, New York

Education:

Columbia University, B.S. in chemistry, 1939; M.A. in chemistry, 1941; Ph.D. in biochemistry, 1948

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Gods Themselves 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the author's few books dealing with intelligence other than humans and human-made robots, and his only extended treatment of sexuality among extraterrestrials. The three parts of the novel take place on Earth, in a parallel universe with different values for basic constants of physics, and on the Moon, illustrating the three parts of the quote from Schiller cited in the foreword, "Against stupidity, the gods themselves contend in vain." Written in the 1980's (as a result of a challenge to write about "alien sex", according to the author's memoirs), the story is an amusing yet salient lesson about the danger of fooling with the natural environment (in a way which, thankfully, seems to be against our current understanding of natural law) to obtain seemingly free energy, and a logical resolution to the impasse between the antagonist's warnings and short-sided policies of humans and aliens. The reader should have a nodding acquaintance with quantum physics, but given the author's famous explanatory talents, no more than needed to follow the plot of a Star Trek episode. It is not for younger children since it does involve vague, sanitized descriptions of ALIEN sexuality within the context of the aliens' family structure, and of the danger of low-gravity sex between a new immigrant from Earth and a native of a human lunar colony. At least a middle school understanding of both the science and the sexual implications would be advisable. I shipped this copy to my grown son, who has never read it, so he may also review this book from his perspective.
John Aveni More than 1 year ago
In the 1970s, this was the book that made me rank Asimov above the other sci-fi greats, and it hasn't really dated itself since. With our continued dependence on fossil fuels, this cautionary tale about the perils of a scientific miracle energy source that seems too good to be true remains chillingly plausible. Sadly, the least believable part is the idea that our heroes may be able to avert the crisis before it's too late.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The book that got me started on science fiction. This is highly original and inspirational work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very imaginative and creative. There's even a chance it will tug at your heart strings.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
People are free to think that way, but they are thinking wrong. Alien sexual biology is merely a side note in a much broader story. Asimov does create a fascinating alien culture with this fine work, and prompts the reader to weigh moral arguments about the benefits versus the pitfalls of technology. The issue of utilizing new technology when there are questions about it's negative effects is the real theme in this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A very good read. The mid section will make you gasp when you uncover the truth about the aliens in the alternate universe. The stuff about the moon and the energy gets a little tedious though. Still not as good as his work in the 50's like the Galactic Empire novels and the 'The End of Eternity.'
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Terrific story, with believable characters and all too realistic politics
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry, but 2/3 of this bood is spent in an alternate universe where amoeba like creatures which merge, mate, communicate, etc, etc...but I just didn't care. If you prefer 'hard' sci fi...then I don't think this book is for you. It wasn't for me.