Gods without Men

Gods without Men

by Hari Kunzru
3.8 24

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Overview

Gods without Men by Hari Kunzru

In the desert, you see, there is everything and nothing . . . It is God without men.
—Honoré de Balzac, Une passion dans le désert, 1830

Jaz and Lisa Matharu are plunged into a surreal public hell after their son, Raj, vanishes during a family vacation in the California desert. However, the Mojave is a place of strange power, and before Raj reappears inexplicably unharmed—but not unchanged—the fate of this young family will intersect with that of many others, echoing the stories of all those who have traveled before them.

Driven by the energy and cunning of Coyote, the mythic, shape-shifting trickster, Gods Without Men is full of big ideas, but centered on flesh-and-blood characters who converge at an odd, remote town in the shadow of a rock formation called the Pinnacles. Viscerally gripping and intellectually engaging, it is, above all, a heartfelt exploration of the search for pattern and meaning in a chaotic universe.
 
This eBook edition includes a Reading Group Guide.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780307957498
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 03/06/2012
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 378,782
File size: 5 MB

About the Author

Hari Kunzru is the author of the novels The Impressionist, Transmission, and My Revolutions, and is the recipient of the Somerset Maugham Award, the Betty Trask Prize from the Society of Authors, a British Book Award, and the Pushcart Prize. Granta has named him one of its twenty best young British novelists, and he was a Fellow at the New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. His work has been translated into twenty-one languages, and his short stories and journalism have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, The New Yorker, the London Review of Books, Wired, and the New Statesman. He lives in New York City.
 
www.harikunzru.com

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Gods Without Men 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
guitaoist3 More than 1 year ago
nietzsche quotes, ufos, pot and talking coyotes. just the kind of book ive been missing
Adaptoid More than 1 year ago
I haven't expanded my thoughts to such far-reaching borders in many years. This novel explores the journey one must undertake to 'experience' without truly understanding the 'unknowable' god. Such profound ideals are what have kept me wavering between atheism and agnosticism my entire life and have acted as a foundation for any relevant sanity I've maintained in a world where a vast majority of people simply can't be bothered.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ever get involved with book or movie where a mystical or otherworldly element is central to the plot and then it ends with no resolve or explanation for what's happening? That's this book. It's well written and the development is interesting... until the Author's cop-out leaves you holding almost 400 pages that don't really go anywhere... A disappointment for this reader.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Compulsively readable and engaging, <i>Gods Without Men</i> develops into a multi-decadal puzzle box with which you can't stop tinkering, and which, like real life, refuses to give up its secrets. To this reader's mind, it bears a close kinship with Umberto Eco's <i>Foucault's Pendulum</i> , another meditation on the ways we humans insist on finding meaning and pattern behind the chaos of the world, and the follies it leads us to. Like Eco, Kunzru parodies that human drive at the same time as he shows the deepest sympathy with it. Kunzru's wide ranging examples are less self-consciously erudite, drawing more on American pop culture and folklore. That will make his book accessible, after a fashion, to a broader audience. But steer clear if you want an author who will, like a kind grandmother, wrap it all up for you at the end in some Hercule-Poirot drawing room flash of clarity.
juliusa More than 1 year ago
Not bad, not good. Holds your interest while going nowhere. Interesting, but maybe not worth your $.
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Any one who talks about this book in a bad way is not worthey to coment on books that involvs with GOD boo
donjuanMS More than 1 year ago
Another great book from Hari Kunzru.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It was the best book I ever read.
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RPFAT More than 1 year ago
I had never read this author before. I will now. Just the kind of book I like - complex, many characters, separate stories with a common thread that develops over time and a little crazy. Keeps my mind working.