Good Brother, Bad Brother: The Story of Edwin Booth and John Wilkes Booth

Good Brother, Bad Brother: The Story of Edwin Booth and John Wilkes Booth

by James Cross Giblin

Paperback(Reprint)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780544809741
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 01/10/2017
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 280,256
Product dimensions: 7.40(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 10 - 12 Years

About the Author

James Cross Giblin is the author of more than 20 critically acclaimed books for young people. His most recent book for Clarion, The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler, received the Robert F. Sibert Award for Informational Books. Mr. Giblin lives in New York City.

Table of Contents

Chapter 1A Brother's Crime1
Chapter 2Crowing Like a Rooster7
Chapter 3"Where Are Your Spurs?"16
Chapter 4Gold Pieces and Blizzards25
Chapter 5Hamlet in Honolulu33
Chapter 6Edwin in Love44
Chapter 7Marching Off to War56
Chapter 8"He Must Come at Once!"67
Chapter 9A Spy and a Blockade Runner76
Chapter 10"When Lincoln Shall Be King"87
Chapter 11"To Whom It May Concern"98
Chapter 12"Sic Semper Tyrannis!"110
Chapter 13The Terrible Aftermath125
Chapter 14"Hunted Like a Dog"136
Chapter 15"Useless, Useless"144
Chapter 16Death by Hanging155
Chapter 17Standing Ovations169
Chapter 18Into the Furnace179
Chapter 19Targeting Edwin188
Chapter 20Triumph in Germany198
Chapter 21A Toast to the Players207
Chapter 22The Last Hamlet216
Bibliography and Source Notes223
Index235

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Giblin is brilliant...breathtaking clarity...readers will be engrossed until the very last footnote." BOOKLIST, starred review

Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

"Giblin raises his biographical curtain....opens a wealth of avenues for further reading...put[s] faces to the history." HORN BOOK Horn Book

"The writing is engaging and eminently readable...consummate storytelling. What a story! This is nonfiction at its finest." SLJ, starred School Library Journal, Starred

"Compelling...fascinating biography of brothers during a time of war....readable and interesting." KIRKUS, starred Kirkus Reviews, Starred

"[A] dual biography by a master of the art...Giblin weaves high drama." The Washington Post BOOK WORLD The Washington Post

"Giblin...offers a particularly poignant picture...relates the fraternal saga with verve as well as diligence." BCCB Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

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Good Brother, Bad Brother the Story of Edwin Booth and John Wilkes Booth 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
ewyatt on LibraryThing 18 hours ago
I really enjoyed this biography of Edwin and John Wilkes Booth, and by extension the Booth family. I knew the events of the assassination of President Lincoln, but I knew very little about John Wilkes Booth and nothing at all about his older brother. It was interesting to read about the family's history and work in theatres around America and how the two brothers really had divergent points of view when it came to the Civil War. The book seems carefully researched.
lilibrarian on LibraryThing 18 hours ago
The story of John Wilkes Booth, who assassinated President Lincoln, and his actor brother, Edwin who was influential in the development of American theater.
pacifickle on LibraryThing 3 months ago
We all know the name of the man who assassinated Abraham Lincoln: John Wilkes Booth. But I never knew anything about him.This biography, usually in-depth for youth nonfiction, narrates the life of the Booth family- John Wilkes, as well as his older brother, Edwin. These two brothers are different throughout their lives in personality as well as politics, but were both famous actors in their time. This book speaks to their childhood until Edwin's death, with the perfect amount of detail.John Wilkes Booth thought himself a hero when assassinating Lincoln, and was shocked that the South didn't approve of his homicidal deed. He imagined himself with the glory of Brutus from the Shakespeare plays he performed so well, and was heartbroken to found he was considered a scoundrel. Edwin lived many many years afterwards, always heavyhearted with shame in being known, frequently even in playbills, as brother to the man who killed America's most beloved President.I would highly recommend this book to any adult interested in learning more about the Booth family, Lincoln's death, or the Civl War. It blends these topics wonderfully and was a great read.
welkinscheek on LibraryThing 3 months ago
Why, when the Civil War had finally ended its gruesome stranglehold over the country and many Americans were in the midst of celebration, would an actor end the life of Abraham Lincoln, herald of peace? James Cross Giblin¿s Good Brother, Bad Brother attempts to address this question, as well as many other mysteries surrounding the Booth family and the events that preceded and followed that fateful night at the Fords Theater.Through an unprejudiced presentation of facts, Giblin provides a detailed account of the life and ideals of John Wilkes Booth, as well as his brother, Edwin. As the title implies, these two have historically stood in contrast with one another; Edwin, the quiet child who eventually became known as the finest Shakespearean actor in America, and John, the favorite child who sympathized with the confederacy, briefly abandoned the stage to help with the hanging of a legendary abolitionist, and notoriously murdered the president. Giblin, however, challenges this polarized public perception of the brothers by portraying their humanity and the formative influences that made them as similar as they were distinct. Each short, informative chapter represents distinct times or events and can be read independently from the rest of the narrative as they are richly informative by their own right. The book¿s organizational structure makes chapter selection easy as it allows readers to navigate to only that information which is relevant their needs. The Table of Contents provides quick reference to events in the chronology of the era, and the clear yet intricate index allows readers to find specific mentions by general terms, and goes on to categorize those terms for even more precision. The author also includes a section of Bibliography and Source Notes, where he describes those sources that were most helpful to him. He follows this with Source Notes by Chapter, which informs readers about the sources that contained the information that appeared in each chapter. These features, along with extensive photographs and historical primary source documents, are a recipe for an exceptional, browse-able biography that will captivate young readers.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago