The Good Soldier

The Good Soldier

by Ford Madox Ford
3.6 37

NOOK Book(eBook)

$3.49 $4.00 Save 13% Current price is $3.49, Original price is $4. You Save 13%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Overview

The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford

At the fashionable German spa town Bad Nauheim, two wealthy, fin de siecle couples — one British, the other American — meet for their yearly assignation. As their story moves back and forth in time between 1902 and 1914, the fragile surface propriety of the pre — World War I society in which these four characters live is ruptured — revealing deceit, hatred, infidelity, and betrayal. "The Good Soldier" is Edward Ashburnham, who, as an adherent to the moral code of the English upper class, is nonetheless consumed by a passion for women younger than his wife — a stoic but fallible figure in what his American friend, John Dowell, calls "the saddest story I ever heard."

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486111117
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 05/31/2012
Series: Dover Thrift Editions
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 160
Sales rank: 1,032,095
File size: 747 KB
Age Range: 14 Years

About the Author

Ford Madox Ford was born on 17 December 1873 in Merton, Devon. He began writing in the 1890s and both his fiction and his criticism are celebrated. His most famous works are The Good Soldier (1915) and Parade's End (1924-8). His other major contribution to literature was the foundation of the English Review in 1908 and the Transatlantic Review in 1924. Ford changed his surname from Hueffer in 1919 after serving in the British army in France during the First World War. After 1927 Ford lived in the United States and France, and he died in Deauville on 26 June 1939.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Good Soldier 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 37 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This arch narrative, covering the subtle, adult betrayals of four members of a pair of couples visiting spas and various grand estates in the early part of the 20th century, conveys as much tragedy as any play by O'Neill and tells you as much about England as any work of Shakespeare. Published in 1915, THE GOOD SOLDIER conveys a sense of Britain's decline not usually detailed in British literature until the 1930s. It seems extraordinarily modern. In some ways, it seems less naive than something written today. Its prose is Jamesian, but these characters are decadent to the core. James never quite describes decadence. It is, also, somehow, a very funny book. HAMLET can be funny, too, of course, so, beware: This is a dark tale indeed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The best French novel in the English language' lives up to its description (I forget by whom). I was lucky to find (and abscond with) it in my uncle's old book closet. It is a fascinating read; the characters slowly develop and morph as the book continues, and the reader has the pleasure of watching the narrator's own perception of the incidents morph upon extended reflection. I agree with the previous review: once you've finished it, you'll find it just begs to be read a second time.
RomiandHenri More than 1 year ago
Skip the intro. It tells you everything that happens and takes away the joy of discovery. You can read it after you finish the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿If for nine years I have possessed a goodly apple that is rotten at the core and discover its rotteness only in nine years and six months less four days, isn¿t it true to say that for nine years I possessed a goodly apple?¿ Amazing. Is ignorance bliss? This book is a classic case of the 'unreliable narrator.' Don't trust what Dowell says- draw your own conclusions. Therein lies the brilliance of the story. Read it again and you'll only discover more...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book just proves there is nothing new under the sun. The narrator was so wrapped up into himself that he never realized til his wife was dead that she had played him like a card! The author writes this in a realistic vein. After learning that his entire marriage has been a sham, the narrator is so upset he has to journal the events on paper. I can't say chronicle because he didn't write anything in order.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Good Soldier is a truly brilliant book. While I was a little distressed to realize I was in my 30's by the time I got around to reading it, I also suspect I might not have fully appreciated this masterpiece at a younger age, and I don't say that very often. The Good Soldier's innocuous title masks a dark, complex, and perceptive portrait of "the falling to pieces of a people." Ford Madox Ford makes masterful use of the "dim witted" narrator trick to infuse much of this dark tale with a surprisingly effective wit, in a manner reminiscent of, but much sharper than, Wilkie Collins's Moonstone character Betteredge. Indeed, Ford takes several unconventional techniques and perfects them in this book, such as the use of a non-chronological narration a la Henry James. The novel will cause you to wade up to the knees in rich and often sinister word play, but it manages to seldom feel overwhelming. I highly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A riveting masterpieece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago