Grade Level 3: Teacher Edition: Grammar and Writing

Grade Level 3: Teacher Edition: Grammar and Writing

Other Format(Spiral Bound - Revised, Teacher Edition)

$81.95

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Eligible for FREE SHIPPING

Overview

Grade Level 3: Teacher Edition: Grammar and Writing by Patricia Healey, Irene Kervick, Anne B. McGuire, Adrienne Saybolt

Let Your Words Take You Where You Want to Go!

The new 2011 edition of Voyages in English: Grammar and Writing is the result of decades of research and practice by experts in the field of grammar and writing. Responding to the needs of teachers and students, this new edition provides ample opportunities for practice and review to ensure mastery and improved performance on standardized tests.

Voyages in English 2011

  • Enables children to master grammar through direct instruction, rigorous practice, written application, and ongoing assessment.
  • Provides master and novice teachers with support and straightforward, practical lesson plans that can be presented with confidence.
  • Guides children to experience, explore, and improve their writing through the in-depth study of unique writing genres, writing-skill lessons, and the implementation of the writing process.
  • Provides children and teachers with opportunities to use technology as a means to learn, assess, apply new skills, and communicate outside of the school setting.
  • Gives children the speaking and writing practice and tools they need to communicate with clarity, accuracy, and ease.

New 2011 Features
We’ve taken the best of the past and incorporated learning tools for today’s students and the world they live in.

  • More exercises in all components offer additional opportunities for review and practice.
  • Daily Maintenance offers quick, daily practice for grammar concepts previously taught to ensure mastery of skills.
  • Improved assessments offer more thorough testing of topics. Grammar and writing assessments are not integrated, providing more flexibility for teachers.
  • ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator CD allows for 25% more testing questions and flexibility in creating individualized tests.
  • Integration opportunities are included in the lessons to naturally show the relationship between grammar and writing.
  • Tech Tips and technology opportunities allow teachers to incorporate technology into lesson plans and homework assignments.
  • Online resources provide additional support for teachers and additional practice for students.

 

Program Components

Student Edition
Developed in a student-friendly manner to engage all learners, the Student Edition provides clear instruction and guided practice in the writing process, the traits of effective writing, and the structure and mechanics of language.

Teacher Edition
Consistent in structure and full of helpful instructional tools, the Teacher Edition offers a straightforward, flexible plan for integrating grammar and writing. Teacher Planning Pages provide additional background information and teaching tips for ease in lesson planning.

Practice Book*
Additional exercises connected to the textbook offer ample review and practice opportunities in grammar and writing skills.

Assessment Book*
Effective assessment enables teachers to record progress, differentiate instruction, and challenge students accordingly. A variety of assessments are included.

Test Generator*
The ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator provides an adaptable tool to create a variety of assessments. The preformatted yet customizable assessments correspond with the Assessment Book and provide an additional 25% new test items for each assessment. 

*Supplemental component


Web Site

Web Features

For Students

  • Additional opportunities to build and practice grammar and writing skills
  • Grammar and Mechanics Handbook for at-home use
  • Interactive games for more practice
  • Additional writing activities expand learning.

For Teachers

  • Tools and support to plan and execute lessons
  • Grammar Guides online resource helps you teach grammar clearly, creatively, and confidently.
  • Video Tools to effectively implement grammar lessons and writing chapters into your classroom.
  • Lesson Plan Charts show how to integrate the grammar and writing sections.

Two Core Parts—One Cohesive Program
Voyages in English is organized into two distinct parts: grammar and writing. The student books are divided in this way to help teachers tailor lesson plans to student needs and to differentiate instruction. The benefits of this organization include the following:

  • Grammar lessons have a greater level of depth, giving students the tools needed to learn the structure of language.
  • Writing instruction is relevant to students’ lives, to the literature they read and enjoy, and to the writing they experience every day.
  • Integration opportunities are built into the program, allowing teachers to show the relationship between grammar and writing.
  • Flexible planning becomes simple, allowing for adaptations based on students’ developmental levels.
  • Long-range and thematic planning is effortless, allowing teachers to cover the required standards.

Grammar: Part I The Structure of Language

  • Parts of speech
  • Usage
  • Mechanics
  • Agreement
  • Punctuation/capitalization

Writing: Part II Written Expression

  • Elements of effective writing
  • Genre characteristics
  • Sentence structure
  • Word and study skills
  • Seven-step writing process

Voyages at a Glance
Voyages in English 2011 is a comprehensive English language arts program of the highest quality. Voyages in English aligns with and supports

  • NCLB recommendations
  • NCTE/IRA Standards for English language arts 
  • State Guidelines and standards

 

Student Edition: Grammar
Systematic Grammar Study

  • Thorough explanations and clear examples are provided for every grammar topic.
  • Ample practice ensures skill mastery.
  • Integration Opportunity: Grammar in Action challenges students to spot the importance of grammar in real-life writing.
  • Tech Tips offer suggestions for practical technology integration.
  • Integration Opportunity: Apply It Now presents solid skill application to demonstrate comprehension.
  • Grammar Review for every section is used as review or informal assessment.
  • Grammar Challenge follows each Grammar Review to extend the learning or offer another opportunity for informal assessment.
  • Sentence Diagramming helps students analyze and visualize sentence structure.

Teacher Edition: Grammar
Easy-to-Use, Flexible Format

  • Daily Maintenance revisits previous grammar concepts to ensure mastery.
  • Warm-Ups introduce grammar concepts in a relevant way.
  • Easy four-step teaching approach is implemented in every lesson: Teach, Practice, Apply, Assess.
  • Diagram It! highlights  sentence-diagramming opportunities.
  • Writing Connections help teachers transition easily between the writing and grammar sections.

Student Edition: Writing
Comprehensive Writing Practice

  • Integration Opportunity: Link demonstrates a writing concept or skill within the context of real-life writing or literary works.
  • Easy-to-follow, practical explanations and examples make writing relevant and engaging.
  • Integration Opportunity: Grammar in Action offers grammar application that happens naturally within the context of writing.
  • Step-by-step practice is led by a model student.
  • Complete coverage of writing skills and the writing process improves standardized test-taking success.
  • Traits of effective writing are integrated in natural, relevant ways.

Teacher Edition: Writing
Consistent Instructional Steps

  • Read, Listen, Speak offers opportunities for small-group discussion.
  • Grammar Connections allow seamless integration between writing and grammar.
  • Teaching options help teachers meet the needs of all students: Reteach, Multiple Intelligences, and English-Language Learners
  • For Tomorrow provides practical writing assignments for homework or independent classwork.

Teacher Planning Pages
Background and Support

  • Grammar essentials provide all the background you need to teach grammar.
  • Common Errors advise how to correct frequent mistakes.
  • Grammar Expert answers questions about grammar.
  • Diagramming Basics show sentence structure.
  • A genre summary explains the fundamentals of each writing genre.
  • Literature lists offer ideas for additional genre demonstration and exploration.
  • Rubrics allow for a clear, easy grading process.
  • Grammar connections provide relevant ways to incorporate grammar into the Writer’s Workshop.

 

Practice Book

Grammar Practice
Every grammar section of the Practice Book begins with Daily Maintenance opportunities to review grammar concepts. Every grammar topic receives at least one page of additional practice.

Writing Practice
The writing portion of the Practice Book includes one page of practice for every writing lesson.

 

Assessment Book

The Assessment Book provides teachers with a variety of assessments to guide instruction and differentiation. Includes assessments on

  • Grammar Skills
  • Summative Grammar Skills
  • Writing Skills
  • Writing Process

ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator
These preformatted yet customizable assessments correspond with the Assessment Book but provide an additional 25% new test items for each assessment. With this CD, teachers can build and administer tests and analyze results.

Each grade-level CD provides

  • Alignment to key national and state standards
  • The ability to save questions in Question Banks for compilation into multiple study guides and assessments
  • Variety of question-selection methods and question types
  • Question-scrambling capability for multiple test versions and secure test conditions
  • Multiple test-delivery methods
  • Grade assessments through a variety of scanning methods, track progress, and generate reports
  • On-screen help

 

 

 

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780829428223
Publisher: Loyola Press
Publication date: 08/01/2010
Series: Voyages in English 2011
Edition description: Revised, Teacher Edition
Pages: 608
Product dimensions: 10.88(w) x 12.25(h) x 1.50(d)
Age Range: 7 - 13 Years

About the Author

Patricia Healey, IHM BA, Immaculata University MA, Temple University
20 years teaching; 20 years in administration

Anne B. McGuire, IHM BA, Immaculata University MA, Villanova University MA, Immaculata University
16 years teaching; 14 years as elementary principal; 10 years staff development

Irene Kervick, IHM BA, Immaculata University MA, Villanova University
46 years teaching

Adrienne Saybolt, IHM BA, Immaculata University Pennsylvania State Board of Education, professional certification MA, St. John’s University
40 years teaching
 

Read an Excerpt

Welcome to Voyages in English, a core English language arts curriculum that has been an outstanding success in elementary and middle schools since 1942. From the time of first publication, Voyages in English (Voyages) has focused on providing students with the tools necessary to become articulate communicators of the English language. For over 65 years, those who wrote, published, and used Voyages for classroom instruction never abandoned the belief that communication skills are crucial for opportunities and success in education and eventually in employment.
With these expectations in mind, Voyages has advanced the best values of the past to meet the demands of communication in the twenty-first century. The curriculum meets the following goals:

  • Enable children to master grammar through direct instruction, rigorous practice, written application, and ongoing assessment.
  • Guide children to experience, explore, and improve their writing through the in-depth study of unique writing genres, writing skill lessons, and the implementation of the writing process.
  • Give children the speaking and writing practice and tools they need to communicate with clarity, accuracy, and ease.
  • Provide children and teachers with opportunities to use technology as a means to learn, assess, apply new skills, and communicate outside the school setting.
  • Provide master and novice teachers with support and straightforward, practical lesson plans that can be presented with confidence.

When learning is presented as a positive opportunity and a challenging adventure, children respond. Voyages in English subscribes to this idea, just as previous editions have. Regular, consistent use of Voyages helps create successful communicators in school and—eventually—in society. So welcome to Voyages in English: Grammar and Writing—enjoy the journey!

Complete and Comprehensive

Voyages in English: Grammar and Writing for grades 3 through 8 fully prepares students to become literate masters of the written and spoken word. The components and lessons in this program are the result of decades of research and practice by experts in the field of grammar and writing. The result—better writers, readers, listeners, and speakers as well as happy teachers, principals, and parents!

Student Editions

Teacher Editions

Practice Books Grades 3–8

Assessment Books Grades 3–8

Additional Student Practice www.voyagesinenglish.com

Optional Customizable Assessment Grades 3–8
ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator

Additional Teacher Support www.voyagesinenglish.com

Program Overview

Two Core Parts—One Cohesive Program

 Voyages in English is organized into two distinct parts: grammar and writing. The student books are divided in this way to help teachers tailor lesson plans to student needs and differentiate instruction. The benefits of this type of organization include the following:

  • Grammar lessons have greater depth, giving students the tools needed to learn the structure of language.
  • Writing instruction is relevant to students’ lives, to the literature they read and enjoy, and to writing that they experience every day.
  • Integration opportunities are built into the program, allowing teachers to show the relationship between grammar and writing.
  • Flexible planning becomes simple, allowing for adaptations based on students’ developmental levels.
  • Long-range and thematic planning is effortless, allowing teachers to cover required standards.

Part I: Grammar
The Structure of Language

  • Parts of speech
  • Usage
  • Mechanics
  • Agreement
  • Punctuation/capitalization

Part II: Written and Oral Communication
Written Expression

  • Traits of effective writing
  • Genre characteristics
  • Sentence structure
  • Word and study skills
  • Seven-step writing process

Integration Opportunities
Throughout the program, ample integration opportunities are built in to provide a systematic review of essential concepts.

Part I: Grammar
Writing Integration

Part II: Written and Oral Communication
Grammar Integration

 

Student Edition: Grammar

An excellent education in the acquisition and application of language has never been exclusively about memorizing parts of speech in isolation or diagramming a sentence as an end in itself. Because of this, Voyages in English takes grammar further, helping students become polished, articulate, and intelligent communicators.
The grammar portion of the Student Edition focuses on the needs of the students and in building their confidence so that when they speak, others listen, and when they write, others understand their message and want to read more. In other words, Voyages in English has what it takes to help students succeed: more practice, more rigor, more application, more integration.

  • Thorough explanations and clear examples are provided for every grammar topic.
  • Ample practice ensures skill mastery.
  • Grammar in Action features challenge students to spot the importance of grammar in real-life writing.
  • Tech Tips offer suggestions for practical, simple ways to integrate technology.
  • Apply It Now features present solid skill application to demonstrate comprehension.
  • A Grammar Review for every grammar section helps build student confidence and offers two full pages that can be used as review or informal assessment.
  • A Grammar Challenge follows each Grammar Review to extend the learning or offer another opportunity for informal assessment.
  • Sentence Diagramming at every grade level helps students analyze, visualize, and unlock the English language.
  • The Grammar and Mechanics Handbook provides a quick reference tool for grammar, usage, and mechanics topics.

 

Teacher Edition: Grammar

The core values and competencies that fortify Voyages in English have always been focused on high-level instruction that challenges the most able of students and supports those who struggle. Therefore, the Teacher Edition of Voyages in English is crafted with an easy-to-use, flexible format that includes support for teachers of all experience levels who serve children at all levels of development.

Background and Planning Support

  • An at-a-glance skills list provides focus for each grammar section.
  • Clear and straightforward grammar essentials provide all the background teachers need to teach the grammar topic.
  • Detailed materials lists allow for easy planning.
  • Ideas for literature invite teachers to show grammar skills in context.
  • Common Errors features alert teachers to errors students often make and advise how to correct them.
  • Diagramming basics review concepts so teaching is easier.
  • Grammar Expert questions and answers offer even more support to bring teachers up to speed on grammar.

Instruction

  • Daily Maintenance features help maintain proficiency in grammatical concepts that have already been taught and assessed.
  • Warm-Ups offer relevant, practical ideas for introducing each grammar concept in a way students can understand.
  • Systematic, direct instruction is provided for each grammar concept.
  • An easy four-step teaching approach is implemented in every lesson: Teach, Practice, Apply, Assess.
  • Teaching Options allow teachers to tailor instruction to student needs through Reteach, Multiple Intelligences, English-Language Learners, and Diagram It!
  • Writing Connections help teachers transition easily and naturally between the writing and grammar sections.
  • Diagram It! features highlight sentence diagramming opportunities throughout the year.

 

Student Edition: Writing

Writing Lessons
A truly excellent writing program always sets its sights on lifetime communication competence. Voyages in English is rooted in its tradition of excellence by helping students employ writing concepts, skills, and strategies that have stood the test of time.

  • Link features demonstrate a writing concept or skill within the context of real-life writing or literary works.
  • Easy-to-follow, practical explanations and examples make writing relevant and engaging.
  • Grammar in Action features offer grammar application that happens naturally within the context of writing.
  • Ample practice encourages writing mastery.
  • Tech Tips provide simple, natural ways to integrate technology in the classroom or at home.
  • Writer’s Corner experiences offer skill application for each writing concept.

Writer’s Workshop
In the span of one year, students work through a seven-step writing process to develop and publish eight written pieces that span eight distinct writing genres, including research reports. The systematic and evolutionary development of each piece sets in motion the goal of producing reflective, creative, critical, and articulate communicators.

  • Step-by-step practice is led by a model student.
  • Traits of effective writing are integrated in natural, relevant ways.
  • Complete coverage of writing skills and the writing process can increase standardized test-taking success.

The seven-step writing process mirrors the process often used by professional writers:

  • Prewriting
  • Drafting
  • Content editing
  • Revising
  • Copyediting
  • Proofreading
  • Publishing

Complete coverage of genres includes

  • Personal narratives
  • Research reports
  • Persuasive writing
  • Descriptions
  • Expository writing
  • How-to articles
  • Formal letters
  • Friendly letters
  • Multiple forms of creative writing

 

Teacher Edition: Writing

Since all students deserve a strong, interesting, and challenging curriculum with high-level results, Voyages in English not only raises the bar for expected outcomes but also provides strong and consistent instructional steps and support for teachers. A clear, easy-to-follow format gives new teachers and seasoned professionals the tools and confidence they need to guide students.

Background and Planning Support
In the Genre Planner, teachers are provided with clear definitions of the elements and characteristics of the specific writing genres they will present, allowing them to teach with confidence and consistency.

  • Detailed materials lists allow for at-a-glance planning.
  • A genre summary explains the fundamentals of the writing genre.
  • Literature lists offer ideas for additional genre demonstration and exploration.
  • Helpful ideas are presented to enhance and extend the Writer’s Workshop.
  • Grammar connections provide relevant ways to incorporate grammar into the Writer’s Workshop.
  • Rubrics guide instruction and allow for a clear, easy grading process.

Instruction

  • Read, Listen, Speak features offer small-group discussion of the writing assignment.
  • Grammar Connections allow seamless integration between writing and grammar.
  • Systematic, direct instruction is provided for each topic.
  • Link offers ways that popular writing can be used as a model.
  • A simple four-step teaching approach: Teach, Practice, Apply, Assess
  • Activities in a variety of learning styles: Reteach, Multiple Intelligences, and English-Language Learners
  • For Tomorrow features provide practical writing assignments and additional practice for homework or in-class study.

Rubrics
The Teacher Editions provide reproducible rubrics for students and teachers.

 

Practice book: Practice Makes Perfect

Research shows that the more exposure and practice students have using newly introduced skills, the more likely they are to internalize and master them. That’s why Voyages in English provides ample opportunity for additional practice.

Grammar Section Practice
Each grammar section of the Practice Book begins with Daily Maintenance opportunities that are described in each Teacher Edition lesson. Every grammar topic receives at least one page of additional practice.

  • Easy-to-understand directions
  • Plenty of practice
  • Point-of-use reminder and reference tool
  • A clear explanation of the grammar skill
  • Quick daily practice opportunities help students maintain grammar proficiency.

Writing Chapter Practice
The writing portion of the Practice Book is in one-to-one correspondence with the Student Edition and the Teacher Edition.

  • A concise definition of the lesson topic
  • Targeted practice
  • Handy reference for review
  • Clear directions

 

Assessment book: The Key to Informed Instruction

Effective assessment helps teachers note progress, guide instruction, and reveal opportunities for differentiation. Each day, in various ways, Voyages in English offers a variety of assessment opportunities that help teachers obtain targeted information about their students’ development.

Assess Grammar
Each grammar assessment challenges students to display their knowledge of previously taught content.

Assess Over Time
Summative assessments offer teachers the ability to assess over time—combining two or more grammar sections into one test.

Assess Writing
The writing assessments ask students to show their knowledge of specifically taught skills as well as use the writing process to craft a written piece. Writing-process assessments help prepare students for standardized tests.

Assess According to Class Needs ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator
Today’s teachers need flexibility to customize assessment to meet the needs of all students, offer assessment in a variety of formats, and analyze results quickly and easily. Therefore, Voyages in English is proud to offer the ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator, “a complete toolset in three seamless applications.”
Voyages in English Test Generator is available for separate purchase. With this CD, teachers can build comprehensive tests with the Test Generator, administer customized tests with the Test Player, and analyze results with the Test Manager.

Each grade-level CD provides teachers with the following:

  • Preformatted yet customizable assessments that correspond with the Assessment Book while offering 25% new test items for each test
  • Alignment to key national and state standards
  • The ability to save questions in Question Banks for compilation into multiple study guides and assessments
  • Wide variety of question-selection methods and question types
  • Question-scrambling capability for multiple test versions and secure test conditions
  • Multiple test-delivery methods: printed, LAN, or export the test as an HTML file to be manually posted to a Web site
  • Grade assessments through a variety of scanning methods, track progress, and generate reports
  • On-screen help

Contact your sales representative at 800-621-1008 for more information or visit us online at www.voyagesinenglish.com.

Students: Technology Integration

In the Book
Students are invited to communicate, collaborate, research, and problem-solve using technology. Online resources and digital tools are suggested to enhance writing and reinforce grammar topic application.

  • Tech Tips invite students to creatively apply their grammar skills, using a variety of technologies.
  • Direct technology instruction embedded into student lessons
  • Students explore ways to publish their work using technology.

On the Web
Find additional opportunities for students to strengthen and polish their grammar and writing skills at www.voyagesinenglish.com.

  • Grammar and Mechanics Handbook for at-home use
  • Additional writing activities expand learning.
  • Interactive games for more practice

 

Teachers: Technology Integration

In the Book
Easy, practical tips allow teachers to make technology a natural part of the language-arts classroom.

  • Tech Tips offer teachers techniques to get the most out of technology.
  • Many For Tomorrow activities invite students to use technology as part of their homework.
  • Teaching Options include technology to enhance learning.

For the Computer

  • Optional ExamView® Assessment Suite Test Generator (see page OV-17)

On the Web
Plenty of online support, including professional development and planning.

  • Ask An Expert provides additional teacher background to common questions.
  • Research document explains how Voyages is based and anchored in research.
  • Lesson Plan Charts show how to integrate the grammar and writing sections.


Creating a Plan That Works for You

Voyages in English provides a consistent, systematic teaching plan for student success and excellence in writing and grammar proficiency—with room for individual adaptation. The program can be used in many ways, supporting each teacher’s personal style.

Integrated Approach
Many teachers follow the integration suggestions that are provided in the book. To do this, teachers follow the Teacher Edition step by step. This is especially helpful to new teachers. Teachers build their plans based on the suggestions in the wrap-around text, leading them to toggle between the grammar and writing portions of the textbook. They cover the grammar lessons, writing skills, and the Writer’s Workshops.

Focus on Grammar Approach
Some teachers choose to separate the book sections and focus on grammar for direct instruction. They teach grammar as part of a grammar/language arts block every day, and then have students work through the writing portion of the book at a different time, such as during reading time as seatwork. They may also choose to teach writing less often than grammar.

Focus on Writing Approaches
Some teachers provide direct instruction throughout the writing chapters and have students work through the grammar portion of the book during their reading time. Or they assess students’ grammar skills and teach only the sections in which students need further development, freeing up time to focus on the writing chapters.
Other teachers follow the writing lesson plans, but as soon as the students have a grasp of the genre characteristics, they begin the Writer’s Workshop. The teacher continues teaching the writing skills lessons as needed only. This allows students more time to work on their final piece while they learn how to improve their writing and grammar skills.

Mixed-Order Approach
Teachers who integrate grammar and writing instruction into their set reading curriculum schedule often teach the grammar sections and writing chapters in an order that suits the stories that students are experiencing. For example, if students are reading an autobiography in reading class, teachers may choose to have students experience the personal narrative writing chapter and the pronouns grammar section.

 

Lesson Plans for the Integrated Approach
If you choose to implement the integrated approach, then use the following as a guide for how each grammar section and writing chapter work together.

Grade 3

Grammar
Sentences Nouns Pronouns Verbs Adjectives Adverbs and Conjunctions Punctuation and Capitalization Diagramming

Writing
Personal Narratives How-to Articles Descriptions Personal Letters Book Reports Persuasive Writing Creative Writing Research Reports

Grade 4

Grammar
Sentences Nouns Pronouns Adjectives Verbs Adverbs and Conjunctions Punctuation and Capitalization Diagramming

Writing
Personal Narratives Formal Letters Descriptions How-to Articles Persuasive Writing Creative Writing Expository Writing Research Reports

Grade 5

Grammar
Nouns Pronouns Adjectives Verbs Adverbs Prepositions, Conjunctions, and Interjections Sentences Punctuation and Capitalization Diagramming

Writing
Personal Narratives How-to Articles Business Letters Descriptions Book Reports Creative Writing Persuasive Writing Research Reports

Grade 6

Grammar
Nouns Pronouns Adjectives Verbs Adverbs Sentences Conjunctions, Interjections, Punctuation, and Capitalization Diagramming

Writing
Personal Narratives How-to Articles Descriptions Persuasive Writing Expository Writing Business Letters Creative Writing Research Reports

Grade 7

Grammar
Nouns Adjectives Pronouns Verbs Verbals Adverbs Prepositions Sentences Conjunctions and Interjections Punctuation and Capitalization Diagramming

Writing
Personal Narratives Business Letters How-to Articles Descriptions Book Reviews Creative Writing Expository Writing Research Reports

Grade 8

Grammar
Nouns Adjectives Pronouns Verbs Verbals Adverbs Prepositions Sentences Conjunctions and Interjections Punctuation and Capitalization Diagramming

Writing
Personal Narratives How-to Articles Business Letters Descriptions Expository Writing Persuasive Writing Creative Writing Research Reports

 

Lesson Planning Made Easy
Each grammar section provides a developmentally appropriate study of a part of speech that includes grammar lessons with ample practice, a review lesson, and a challenge lesson. The Writing Connection that culminates each grammar lesson leads to the writing portion of the book to create an opportunity for integration between the two main parts. Each writing chapter in Voyages in English is a study of a single genre—a chapter opener, six lessons, and the genre’s Writer’s Workshop. Here are the main instructional elements for each grammar section and writing chapter.

Part I: Grammar

  • Daily Maintenance
  • Warm-Up
  • Practice
  • Review
  • Challenge

Part II: Written and oral communication

  • Literature excerpt
  • Student model
  • Genre lessons
  • Writing skills lessons
  • Writer’s Workshops

If You Teach Grammar and Writing Three Days a Week,

  • condense Voyages into a three-day-a-week plan.
  • complete two of the activities and exercises shown in each grammar section and writing page span.

Monday
Grammar
1.1 Sentences
1.2 Declarative & Interrogative Sentences
Writing
Personal Narratives Introducing the Genre, pp. 210–211

Wednesday
Grammar
1.3 Imperative & Exclamatory Sentences
Writing
What Makes a Good Personal Narrative?, pp. 212–215

Friday
Grammar
1.4 Complete Subjects & Predicates
Writing
Introductions and Conclusions, pp. 216–219

If You Teach Grammar and Writing Every Day,

  • apply this five-day-a-week plan throughout the program.
  • complete all the activities and exercises shown in each grammar section and writing page span.

Monday
Day 1
Grammar
1.1 Sentences
Writing
Personal Narratives Introducing the Genre pp. 210–211
Reading the excerpt and student model

Tuesday
Day 2
Grammar
1.2 Declarative & Interrogative Sentences
Writing
What Makes a Good Personal Narrative?, pp. 212–213

Wednesday
Day 3
Grammar
1.3 Imperative & Exclamatory Sentences
Writing
What Makes a Good Personal Narrative?, pp. 214–215

Thursday
Day 4
Grammar
1.4 Complete Subjects & Predicates
Writing
Introduction, Body, & Conclusion, pp. 216–217

Friday
Day 5
Grammar
1.5 Simple Subjects & Predicates
Writing
Introduction, Body, & Conclusion, pp. 218–219

Monday
Day 6
Grammar
1.6 Compound Subjects
Writing
Study Skills: Time Lines, pp. 220–221

Tuesday
Day 7
Grammar
1.7 Compound Predicates
Writing
Study Skills: Time Lines, pp. 222–223

Wednesday
Day 8
Grammar
1.8 Direct Objects
Writing
Writing Skills: Exact Words, pp. 224–225

Thursday
Day 9
Grammar
1.9 Subject Complements
Writing
Writing Skills: Exact Words, pp. 226–227

Friday
Day 10
Grammar
1.10 Compound Sentences
Writing
Word Study: Contractions with Pronouns, pp. 228–229

Monday
Day 11
Grammar
1.11 Run-on Sentences
Writing
Word Study: Contractions with Pronouns, pp. 230–231

Tuesday
Day 12
Grammar
Sentence Review
Writing
Speaking & Listening Skills: Oral Personal Narrative, pp. 232–23

Wednesday
Day 13
Grammar
Sentence Challenge
Writing
Speaking & Listening Skills: Oral Personal Narrative, pp. 234–235
Writing Skills Assessment

Thursday
Day 14
Grammar
Sentence Assessment
Writing

Friday
Day 15
Grammar

Writing
Writer’s Workshop: Prewriting, pp. 236–237

 

Monday
Day 16
Writing
Writer’s Workshop: Drafting, pp. 238–239   

Tuesday
Day 17
Writing
Writer’s Workshop: Content Editing, pp. 240–241   

Wednesday
Day 18
Writing
Writer’s Workshop: Revising, pp. 242–243   

Thursday
Day 19
Writing
Writer’s Workshop: Copyediting and Proofreading, pp. 244–245   

Friday
Day 20
Writing
Writer’s Workshop: Publishing, pp. 246–247
Genre Assessment

Go to www.voyagesinenglish.com to find sample lesson plans for the whole year—one for each grammar section and writing chapter in the program.

 

Introducing the Program on Day One

Warm-Up
As a class, work together to write a three-sentence “text message” about a favorite book. Challenge students to use common text abbreviations, such as LOL, and convey the message in as few words and letters as possible. Write student ideas on the chalkboard. Read aloud the message two ways: literally and as it is intended. Together, note the differences in how the message sounds.
Explain to students that as technology moves us away from using standard English grammar and writing, it is even more important to learn, master, and use them correctly. Tell students that using grammar and writing correctly will help them be better readers, writers, listeners, and speakers as well as better students and workers when they are adults.

Teach
Guide students on a book walk through the textbook. Review the Table of Contents and the book’s organization and contents. Explain that students will be using Voyages in English in their journey to master English grammar and writing.

Practice
Provide students with a minute or two to review the book’s contents. Tour the room, pointing out interesting book features to individual students.

Apply
Have students go on their first Voyages in English scavenger hunt. Ask students to find features such as a grammar lesson, writing lesson, Writer’s Workshop, Link, Grammar in Action, and Tech Tip. Award points or prizes to the students who are first to find the features.

Assess
Ask students the following questions: Why is it important to study grammar and writing? What is one thing we will be learning this year? Which skill or topic might be most challenging for you? What do you think will be easiest to learn?

Extend
Have students study their book covers. Say: We know that words are powerful. When words are used carefully and correctly, they can take us where we want to go in life. Look at your cover. Choose a person in it. Where do you think he or she is going in life? Take a few minutes to jot some ideas.
Invite student volunteers to share their ideas. Close by saying: Now we’re going to go on a voyage together—to learn about words and writing so that we can go where we want to go. Let’s get started!

 

SECTION 1 PLANNER

“The words of the world want to make sentences.” —Gaston Bachelard

SECTION FOCUS

  • Subjects and predicates
  • Statements and questions
  • Question words
  • Commands
  • Exclamations
  • Kinds of sentences
  • Subjects
  • Predicates
  • Combining subjects and predicates
  • Combining sentences
  • Run-on sentences

SUPPORT MATERIALS

Practice Book
Daily Maintenance, pages 1–4
Grammar, pages 5–16
Assessment Book
Section 1 Assessment, pages 1–4
Test Generator CD
Writing Chapter 1, Personal Narratives
Customizable Lesson Plans
www.voyagesinenglish.com

CONNECT WITH LITERATURE

Consider using the following titles throughout the section to illustrate the grammar concept:

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst
Leonardo, the Terrible Monster by Mo Willems

GRAMMAR FOR GROWN-UPS
Understanding Sentences
A sentence consists of several parts of speech organized into a meaningful pattern that expresses a complete thought. Every sentence has two basic parts: the subject, or the explicit or implicit person, place, or thing talked about, and the predicate, what the subject is, has, or does.

A declarative sentence makes a statement and ends with a period.

Sebastian walked.

An interrogative sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark.

Did Sebastian walk?

An exclamatory sentence expresses strong emotion and ends with an exclamation point.

I can’t believe Sebastian walked!

An imperative sentence gives a command and ends with a period.

Walk, Sebastian.

In an imperative sentence the subject you is often implied and not stated explicitly.

Walk.

Subjects can be combined.

Mary and Juana sit together.

Predicates also can be combined.

Robert hopped and jumped.

Occasionally, two complete sentences are combined incorrectly into a run-on sentence.

The sun came up it was a new day.

A run-on sentence can be corrected by adding a comma and a coordinating conjunction.

The sun came up, and it was a new day.

COMMON ERRORS Identifying Fragments
Some developing writers write sentence fragments rather than complete sentences. This error occurs because young writers often forget that all sentences must have a subject and a predicate.

ERROR: Many children.
CORRECT: Many children play soccer.

ERROR: The frightened tiger.
CORRECT: The frightened tiger is hiding.

As students revise their writing, remind them to check each sentence for a predicate, a word or phrase that tells what something is or does.

SENTENCE DIAGRAMMING
You may wish to teach sentences in the context of diagramming. Review these examples. Then refer to the Diagramming section or look for Diagram It! features in the Sentences section.

You ran.
You           ran subject     verb

Did you run?
you          Did run subject   verb

Run!
(you)                         Run implied subject      verb

ASK AN EXPERT Real Situations, Real Solutions

Grammar Geek I need you to help me My students consistently misuse me and I when writing personal narratives. How can I help them?
It is I,
Maria K.

Maria Re: I need you to help me Display this visual.

Use I as a subject.
I like bananas.
Use I second when you are talking about two people.
James and I went fishing.

Use me in the predicate.
She gave me the ball.
Use me second when you are talking about two people.
Harry told Joey and me the joke.

Review it often with students, from the first week of school to the last.
From me but not I,
Grammar Geek

 

Grammar Geezer At a Complete Loss Some of my students write “sentences” with neither a subject nor a predicate. How can I help them turn these fragments into complete sentences?
Fragmented,
Joyce in Jersey

Joyce Re: At a Complete Loss Write on the board several fragments. Ask students the following questions: Who is this about? What did it/he/she/they do?
Work with the class to ll in missing information so that with every example students can answer the questions above. Remind students that they should be able to provide the necessary information with every sentence in their own writing.
Defragmenting, one sentence at a time,
Grammar Geezer

 

Part 1: Grammar

Section One: Sentences

1.1 Sentences
1.2 Statements and Questions
1.3 Question Words
1.4 Commands
1.5 Exclamations
1.6 Kinds of Sentences
1.7 Subjects
1.8 Predicates
1.9 Combining Subjects and Predicates
1.10 Combining Sentences
1.11 Run-on Sentences
     Sentence Review
     Sentence Challenge

1.1 Sentences

Objectives

  • To identify complete thoughts as sentences
  • To construct complete sentences

Daily Maintenance
Assign Practice Book page 1, Section 1.1. After students finish,

  1. Give immediate feedback.
  2. Review concepts as needed.
  3. Model the correct answer.

Pages 4–5 of the Answer Key contain tips for Daily Maintenance.

WARM-UP
Write the following subjects and predicates on note cards:

Subjects                      Predicates
Bill and José               has more boys than girls.
The girls                       take turns cooking dinner.
Our class                     are good friends.
Mom and Dad             plays soccer.
Jenny                            like to swim.

Have partners make complete sentences and read aloud the sentences to each other.
Read from a piece of writing that the class is currently reading. Emphasize that complete sentences provide complete thoughts.

Teach
Display a photograph or poster. Ask volunteers to describe what they see and how they feel. Write on the board students’ words, phrases, and sentences.
Have a volunteer read aloud about sentences. Tell students that a subject is a noun and a predicate tells what the noun is, has, or does.
Challenge students to identify which of their responses to the photograph or poster have a subject and a predicate and are sentences and which are not. Circle the complete sentences as students identify them.

Practice
Exercise 1
Have volunteers read aloud each item, tell if it is a sentence, and explain why or why not.
Exercise 2
Explain that the phrases in Column A are subjects and those in Column B are predicates. Invite volunteers to read aloud each subject with several predicates, choose one predicate, and tell why it makes the most sense.
Exercise 3
Have partners complete the exercise. Invite students to read aloud their sentences.

Apply
Apply It Now
Remind students that each of their sentences must include a subject and a predicate. Have partners exchange sentences and check that each has a subject and a predicate. Students should demonstrate the ability to identify and construct complete sentences.

Assess
Note which students had difficulty identifying and constructing complete sentences. Assign Practice Book page 5 for further practice.

WRITING CONNECTION
Use pages 210–211 of the Writing portion of the book. Be sure to point out complete sentences in the literature excerpt and the student model.

Teaching Options

Reteach
On a large poster board, copy a paragraph from a text that students have read. Cover parts of sentences with sticky notes so that only incomplete word groups remain. Slowly read the paragraph aloud. Ask students whether they had trouble understanding what you read. Have them explain their answers. Confirm that some of the sentences are incomplete and did not express complete thoughts. Remove the sticky notes and read the sentences aloud to illustrate that they are now sentences.

Meeting Individual Needs
Auditory Assign partners to describe their favorite games or sports to each other. Remind students to speak in complete sentences. Tell students to listen closely to each other’s descriptions. If one partner expresses an incomplete thought, encourage the partners to discuss how to make the thought complete.

Meeting Individual Needs
Challenge Have students choose an article from an age-appropriate magazine. Ask students to copy five sentences from the article. Then have students draw a vertical line to separate the subject and predict in each sentence. Challenge students to use either the subject or predicate from each sentence to write a new sentence.

Diagram It!
To practice these concepts in the context of diagramming, turn to Section 8.1.

Part 2: Written and Oral Communication

Chapters

1 Personal Narratives
2 How-to Articles
3 Descriptions
4 Personal Letters
5 Book Reports
6 Persuasive Writing
7 Creative Writing: Realistic Fiction
8 Research Reports

Chapter 1 Planner Personal Narratives

Chapter focus
Lesson 1: What Makes a Good Personal Narrative?
Lesson 2: Beginning, Middle, and Ending

  • Grammar: Sentences
  • Writing Skills: Strong Verbs
  • Word Study: Colorful Adjectives
  • Study Skills: Dictionary
  • Speaking and Listening Skills: Oral Personal Narratives
  • Writer’s Workshop: Personal Narratives

Support Materials
Practice Book
Writing, pages 132–136
Assessment Book
Chapter 1 Writing Skills, pages 39–40
Personal Narrative Writing Prompt, pages 41–42
Rubrics
Student, page 247y Teacher, page 247z
Test Generator CD
Grammar
Section 1, pages 1–26
Customizable Lesson Plans
www.voyagesinenglish.com

What is a personal narrative?
Personal narratives are about significant events in writers’ lives. The writer of a good personal narrative knows how to let his or her personality shine through by the use of humor, phrasing, dialogue, or a combination of these. Good personal narratives use natural language that does not seem stiff or contrived.
A good personal narrative includes the following:

  • A topic relating to a real event in the writer’s life
  • A first-person point of view
  • A structure that includes an engaging introduction, a cohesive body, and a satisfying conclusion
  • A coherent organization that uses chronological order, flows logically, and excludes unnecessary details
  • Strong verbs and colorful adjectives
  • A voice that allows the narrator’s personality to come through

Use the following titles to offer your students examples of well-crafted personal narratives:

Cal Ripken, Jr.: Play Ball! by Gail Herman, Cal Ripken, and Mike Bryan
Uncle Andy’s by James Warhola
Water Buffalo Days by Huynh Quang Nhuong
When Everybody Wore a Hat by William Steig

Writer’s Workshop Tips
Follow these ideas and tips to help you and your class get the most out of the Writer’s Workshop:

  • Review the traits of good writing. Use the chart on the inside back cover of the student and teacher editions.
  • Encourage students to keep a journal to record important or interesting personal experiences.
  • Invite students to bring in family photos or drawings of favorite family events.
  • Fill your classroom library with autobiographies and novels written in the first person.
  • Bring in songs that tell a first-person narrative.
  • Bring in podcasts or recordings of personal narratives from public radio programs, the library, or the Internet.
  • Have partners interview each other about significant life events. Tell students that the questions can prompt ideas for developing their personal narratives.
  • Show documentaries of children or adults telling their own stories.
  • Have students create time lines of their personal narratives.
  • Invite columnists or memoirists to speak to the class about why and how they publish their own stories.

Connect with Grammar
Throughout the Writer’s Workshop, look for opportunities to integrate sentences with writing personal narratives.

  • During the drafting stage, encourage students to use statements, questions, commands, and exclamations in their personal narratives.
  • During the copyediting stage, have students read aloud and combine sentences to improve sentence fluency.
  • During the proofreading stage, have students make sure each sentence has a subject and a predicate.
  • Have students identify and correct run-on sentences.

Scoring Rubric
Personal Narrative

Point Values
0 = not evident
1 = minimal evidence of mastery
2 = evidence of development toward mastery
3 = strong evidence of mastery
4 = outstanding evidence of mastery

Ideas                                                                                                 Points
topic relating to a real event   
events in time order   

Organization   
a beginning   
a middle   
an ending   

Voice   
the writer’s point of view, using I, me, we, and us   

Word Choice   
colorful adjectives   
time words   

Sentence Fluency   
strong verbs   

Conventions   
correct grammar and usage   
correct spelling   
correct punctuation and capitalization   

Presentation   
neatness   
consistent margins and spacing   
photos or illustrations  

Additional Items

                                                                         Total   

Full-sized, reproducible rubrics can be found at the end of this chapter.

Chapter 1
Personal Narratives

Introducing the Genre
Tell students they will learn about personal narratives in this chapter. Write the following sentence on the board:

Each student will have a personal copy of the book.

Ask the following question: What do you think the word personal means? (It means “individual,” or “belonging to someone.”) Then tell students that narrative means “story.” Explain that if you asked the question What did you do last weekend? their answer would be a personal narrative.
    Introduce the following characteristics of a personal narrative:

  • A personal narrative is a true story about the writer.
  • A personal narrative is told from the writer’s point of view.
  • A personal narrative has a beginning, a middle, and an ending.
  • The events are described in the order in which they happened.

Reading the Literature Excerpt
Have a student read aloud the excerpt. Ask volunteers to point out reasons that this piece is a personal narrative. Ask students to name similar pieces they have read or heard.

Water Buffalo Days
The excerpts in Chapter 1 introduce students to relevant examples of personal narratives. Water Buffalo Days is a strong example of a personal narrative because it does the following:

  • Tells a true story about the writer
  • Is told from the writer’s point of view
  • Has a clear beginning—the writer’s birth

As students encounter the different examples throughout the chapter, be sure to point out characteristics of personal narratives. You may wish to have students identify kinds of sentences, subjects and predicates, and combined sentences in the literature excerpts.

Reading the Student Model
Explain that the story on page 211 is about Melissa and Charlotte. Write the names on the board. Have a volunteer read aloud the model. Ask who is telling the story (Charlotte). Ask what words in the story helped to know that Charlotte is telling the story (I, me). Ask a volunteer to read what he or she thinks is the beginning of the story (It all started when . . .). Remind students that the topic is what the story is about. Ask students to tell what the topic of this story is (how Charlotte got stuck in and rescued from the mud).
Read aloud the entire personal narrative. Ask students to tell the order of events in the story. As students identify the events, list them on the board.
Ask students what might happen if the events were told out of order. (The story would not make sense.) Emphasize the importance of putting events in the order they happened.

Scavenger Hunt
Have small groups search the classroom and the library for examples of personal narratives. Remind students to look for stories about events that really happened to the writers. Suggest that students look for the words I, me, and my to be sure the story is about the person who wrote it.

For Tomorrow
Have students find an example of a personal narrative. Explain that personal narratives can be stories, letters, and newspaper or magazine articles. Point out that an e-mail can even be a personal narrative if it has the right characteristics. Tell students they should be prepared to share what they have found during the next class. Bring in your own example of a personal narrative to share.

LESSON 1: What Makes a Good Personal Narrative?

Objective

  • To recognize the characteristics of a personal narrative

Warm-Up Read, Listen, Speak
Read aloud the personal narrative you brought in for yesterday’s For Tomorrow homework. Point out the characteristics of a personal narrative in your example. Have small groups share their personal narratives. Challenge students to explain how they know their examples are personal narratives.

Grammar Connection
Take this opportunity to talk about sentences and statements and questions. You may wish to have students point out sentences and statements and questions in their Read, Listen, Speak examples.

TEACH
Invite a volunteer to read aloud the opening paragraph. Then have volunteers read aloud the second paragraph and the section Topic. Challenge students to name topics for personal narratives they might write.
Read aloud the first paragraph of the section Point of View. Have students turn to page 211 and count the occurrences of the word I. Ask students why they think the writer uses the word I instead of her name (because the writer is writing about herself). Then read aloud the second paragraph. Ask students to say sentences using the words listed. Tell students to remember to use these words when they write personal narratives.
Have a volunteer read aloud the section Time Order. Ask students to suggest sentences using each time word. Emphasize that telling a story in the order it happened makes the story easier to understand.

PRACTICE

Activity A
Have partners complete the activity. Encourage students to share their answers with the class. Compare the interesting details students mentioned in their answers.

Activity B
Ask students to tell the events of the student model. Write them on the board. Then have small groups complete the activity. Invite volunteers to present and explain their comic strips.

Activity C
Have a volunteer read aloud the personal narrative. Then ask volunteers to read aloud and to answer each question.

APPLY
Writer’s Corner
Explain that students will be choosing topics to write their own personal narratives. Help students brainstorm possible topics such as A Scary Night, My First Day of School, The Best Birthday Ever. Challenge students to draw three pictures that show the beginning, middle, and ending of their stories. Invite volunteers to share their work. Students should demonstrate the ability to recognize the characteristics of a personal narrative.

ASSESS
Note which students had difficulty understanding the characteristics of a personal narrative. Use the Reteach option with those students who need additional reinforcement.

TEACHING OPTIONS Reteach
Have students develop a checklist of the characteristics of a personal narrative. Ask students to find words and phrases on pages 212–213 to use in their checklist. Some examples are topic, point of view, beginning, middle, ending, and time order. Then give students a personal narrative to read. Ask them to check off each item on their checklist as they find it in the personal narrative.
Getting Ready for School
Have students draw comic strips showing what they do to get ready for school each morning. Remind students to make sure all the frames are in the correct order. Challenge students to write under each frame one sentence that describes the picture. Display students’ work in the classroom.

For Tomorrow
Have students ask an adult family member to share a personal narrative from his or her life. Tell students to write the events of the story in order. Remind students to bring their notes to the next class. Obtain a narrative from a friend or family member and bring in your list of events to share.

Table of Contents

Contents

    Introduction    Welcome to Voyages in English    OV-1
        Program Overview    OV-2
        How to Use This Program    OV-20

Part 1: Grammar

    Sentences Teacher Preparation    1a–1b

Section 1    Sentences    1
    1.1    Sentences    2
    1.2    Statements and Questions    4
    1.3    Question Words    6
    1.4    Commands    8
    1.5    Exclamations    10
    1.6    Kinds of Sentences    12
    1.7    Subjects    14
    1.8    Predicates    16
    1.9    Combining Subjects and Predicates    18
    1.10    Combining Sentences    20
    1.11    Run-on Sentences    22
        Sentence Review    24
        Sentence Challenge    26

        Nouns Teacher Preparation    27a–27b

Section 2    Nouns    27
    2.1    Nouns    28
    2.2    Common and Proper Nouns    30
    2.3    Singular and Plural Nouns    32
    2.4    More Plural Nouns    34
    2.5    Irregular Plural Nouns    36
    2.6    Singular Possessive Nouns    38
    2.7    Plural Possessive Nouns    40
    2.8    Irregular Plural Possessive Nouns    42
    2.9    Collective Nouns    44
    2.10    Nouns as Subjects    46
    2.11    Words Used as Nouns and as Verbs    48
        Noun Review    50
        Noun Challenge    52

        Pronouns Teacher Preparation    53a–53b

Section 3    Pronouns    53
    3.1    Pronouns    54
    3.2    Subject Pronouns    56
    3.3    Object Pronouns    58
    3.4    Possessive Pronouns    60
    3.5    Possessive Adjectives    62
    3.6    Agreement of Pronouns and Verbs    64
    3.7    I and Me    66
    3.8    Compound Subjects and Objects    68
        Pronoun Review     70
        Pronoun Challenge     72

        Verbs Teacher Preparation    73a–73b

Section 4    Verbs    73
    4.1    Action Verbs    74
    4.2    Being Verbs    76
    4.3    Helping Verbs    78
    4.4    Principal Parts of Verbs    80
    4.5    Regular and Irregular Verbs    82
    4.6    Bring, Buy, Come, and Sit    84
    4.7    Eat, Go, and See    86
    4.8    Take, Tear, and Write    88
    4.9    Simple Present Tense    90
    4.10    Simple Past Tense     92
    4.11    Future Tense with Will    94
    4.12    Future Tense with Going To    96
    4.13    Present Progressive Tense    98
    4.14    Past Progressive Tense    100
    4.15    Is and Are, Was and Were    102
    4.16    Contractions with Not     104
        Verb Review    106
        Verb Challenge    108

        Adjectives Teacher Preparation    109a–109b

Section 5    Adjectives     109
    5.1    Identifying Adjectives    110
    5.2    Adjectives Before Nouns    112
    5.3    Subject Complements    114
    5.4    Compound Subject Complements    116
    5.5    Adjectives That Compare    118
    5.6    Irregular Adjectives That Compare    120
    5.7    Adjectives That Tell How Many    122
    5.8    Articles    124
    5.9    Demonstrative Adjectives    126
    5.10    Proper Adjectives    128
    5.11    Nouns Used as Adjectives    130
        Adjective Review    132
        Adjective Challenge     134

        Adverbs and Conjunctions Teacher Preparation    135a–135b

Section 6    Adverbs and Conjunctions     135
    6.1    Adverbs    136
    6.2    Adverbs That Tell When or How Often    138   
    6.3    Adverbs That Tell Where    140
    6.4    Adverbs That Tell How    142
    6.5    Negative Words    144
    6.6    Good and Well    146
    6.7    To, Too, and Two    148
    6.8    Their and There    150
    6.9    Coordinating Conjunctions    152
        Adverb and Conjunction Review    154
        Adverb and Conjunction Challenge     156

        Punctuation and Capitalization Teacher Preparation    157a–157b

Section 7    Punctuation and Capitalization     157
    7.1    End Punctuation    158
    7.2    Capitalization    160
    7.3    Abbreviations    162
    7.4    Personal Titles and Initials    164
    7.5    Titles of Books and Poems    166
    7.6    Commas in a Series    168
    7.7    Commas in Direct Address    170
    7.8    Commas in Compound Sentences    172
    7.9    Apostrophes    174
    7.10    Addresses    176
    7.11    Direct Quotations    178
        Punctuation and Capitalization Review     180
        Punctuation and Capitalization Challenge     182

        Diagramming Teacher Preparation    183a–183b

Section 8    Diagramming     183
    8.1    Subjects and Predicates    184
    8.2    Possessives    186
    8.3    Adjectives    188
    8.4    Adverbs    190
    8.5    Adjectives as Subject Complements    192
    8.6    Compound Subjects    194
    8.7    Compound Predicates    196
    8.8    Compound Subject Complements    198
    8.9    Compound Sentences    200
    8.10    Diagramming Practice    202
    8.11    More Diagramming Practice    204
        Diagramming Review     206
        Diagramming Challenge     208
 

Part 2 Written and Oral Communication

       Personal Narratives Teacher Preparation    210a–210b

Chapter 1    Personal Narratives    210
    Lesson 1    What Makes a Good Personal Narrative?    212
    Lesson 2    Beginning, Middle, and Ending    216
    Lesson 3    Writing Skills: Strong Verbs    220
    Lesson 4    Word Study: Colorful Adjectives    224
    Lesson 5    Study Skills: Dictionary    228
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Oral Personal Narratives    232
        Writer’s Workshop: Personal Narratives    236
        Rubrics    247y–247z

        How-to Articles Teacher Preparation    248a–248b

Chapter 2    How-to Articles    248
    Lesson 1    What Makes a Good How-to Article?    250
    Lesson 2    Parts of a How-to Article    254
    Lesson 3    Study Skills: Dictionary Meanings    258
    Lesson 4    Writing Skills: The Four Kinds of Sentences    262
    Lesson 5    Word Study: Compound Words    266
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: How-to Talks    270
        Writer’s Workshop: How-to Articles     274
        Rubrics    285y–285z

        Descriptions Teacher Preparation    286a–286b

Chapter 3    Descriptions    286
    Lesson 1    What Makes a Good Description?    288
    Lesson 2    Writing a Description    292
    Lesson 3    Writing Skills: Sensory Words    296
    Lesson 4    Study Skills: Five-Senses Chart    300
    Lesson 5    Word Study: Synonyms    304
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Oral Descriptions    308
        Writer’s Workshop: Descriptions    312
        Rubrics    323y–323z

        Personal Letters Teacher Preparation    324a–324b

Chapter 4    Personal Letters    324
    Lesson 1    What Makes a Good Personal Letter?    326
    Lesson 2    The Body of a Personal Letter    330
    Lesson 3    Literacy Skills: Personal E-Mails    334
    Lesson 4    Writing Skills: Compound Subjects    338
    Lesson 5    Word Study: Antonyms    342
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Telephone Conversations    346
        Writer’s Workshop: Personal Letters    350
        Rubrics    361y–361z

        Book Reports Teacher Preparation    362a–362b

Chapter 5    Book Reports    362
    Lesson 1    What Makes a Good Book Report?    364
    Lesson 2    Character and Plot    368
    Lesson 3    Study Skills: Parts of a Book    372
    Lesson 4    Writing Skills: Compound Predicates    376
    Lesson 5    Word Study: Prefixes    380
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Oral Book Reports    384
        Writer’s Workshop: Book Reports    388
        Rubrics    399y–399z

        Persuasive Writing Teacher Preparation    400a–400b

Chapter 6    Persuasive Writing    400
    Lesson 1    What Makes Good Persuasive Writing?    402
    Lesson 2    Beginning, Middle, and Ending    406
    Lesson 3    Study Skills: Idea Webs    410
    Lesson 4    Writing Skills: Compound Sentences    414
    Lesson 5    Word Study: Suffixes    418
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Persuasive Speeches     422
        Writer’s Workshop: Persuasive Writing    426
        Rubrics    437y–437z

        Creative Writing: Realistic Fiction Teacher Preparation    438a–438b

Chapter 7    Creative Writing: Realistic Fiction    438
    Lesson 1    What Makes Good Realistic Fiction?    440
    Lesson 2    Characters    444
    Lesson 3    Writing Skills: Dialogue    448
    Lesson 4    Word Study: Contractions    452
    Lesson 5    Writing Poetry: Lines That Rhyme    456
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Skits    460
        Writer’s Workshop: Realistic Fiction    464
        Rubrics    475y–475z

        Research Reports Teacher Preparation    476a–476b

Chapter 8    Research Reports    476
    Lesson 1    What Makes a Good Research Report?    478
    Lesson 2    Facts and Notes    482
    Lesson 3    Study Skills: Library Skills    486
    Lesson 4    Writing Skills: Revising Sentences    490
    Lesson 5    Word Study: Homophones    494
    Lesson 6    Speaking and Listening Skills: Oral Biographies    498
        Writer’s Workshop: Research Reports    502
        Rubrics    513y–513z

Proofreading Marks     514
Grammar and Mechanics Handbook     515
Index     530
Acknowledgments    T-535
Scope and Sequence    T-536
Proofreading Marks    inside back cover
Writing Traits    inside back cover
 

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews