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Graduate Study For The Twenty-First Century
     

Graduate Study For The Twenty-First Century

4.2 4
by Gregory M. Colon Semenza, Michael Berube
 

Many graduate students continue to be regarded as "apprentices" despite the fact that they are expected to design and teach their own classes, serve on university committees, and conference and publish regularly. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that the attrition rate for American Ph.D. programs is at an all-time high, between 40% and 50% (higher

Overview

Many graduate students continue to be regarded as "apprentices" despite the fact that they are expected to design and teach their own classes, serve on university committees, and conference and publish regularly. The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that the attrition rate for American Ph.D. programs is at an all-time high, between 40% and 50% (higher for women and minorities). Of those who finish, only one in three will secure tenure-track jobs. These statistics highlight waste: of millions of dollars by universities and of time and energy by students. Rather than teaching graduate students how to be graduate students, then, the guide prepares them for what they really seek: a successful academic career.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781403969361
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
10/01/2005
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
5.51(w) x 8.15(h) x 0.85(d)

Meet the Author

Gregory Colon Semenza is assistant professor of English, University of Connecticut.

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Graduate Study For The Twenty-First Century 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was amazed to stumble upon this book a few weeks ago. After having read one 'go-get-'em-tiger' book about grad school after another, I felt only put upon after receiving this as a 'gift' for my birthday. Once I started reading, though, I was amazed by how different this book is from all those other 'survival' manuals. In fact, Semenza begins with the premise that surviving grad school isn't much of a goal in itself since just surviving might leave you unemployed. In a painfully realistic voice, Semenza goes on to describe the realities of academia for graduate students today, focusing mainly on professional development issues (chapters on publishing, conferencing, etc.), but also delving into the unionization controversy and such basic matters as grading and interacting with colleagues. The book is heavily reliant on Semenza's own expertise in a literature department, but I felt the information to be applicable across the humanities. A really valuable book.