×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Grandma Elephant's in Charge
  • Alternative view 1 of Grandma Elephant's in Charge
  • Alternative view 2 of Grandma Elephant's in Charge
     

Grandma Elephant's in Charge

by Martin Jenkins, Ivan Bates (Illustrator)
 

See All Formats & Editions

An entertaining, educational look at the everyday life of a family of elephants - who never forget who’s in charge.

Elephants are the biggest animals on land, and they live in big families, too. So who can possibly keep them in line? Grandma! After all, she’s been around long enough to know where all the best watering holes are, how to gather the

Overview

An entertaining, educational look at the everyday life of a family of elephants - who never forget who’s in charge.

Elephants are the biggest animals on land, and they live in big families, too. So who can possibly keep them in line? Grandma! After all, she’s been around long enough to know where all the best watering holes are, how to gather the tastiest food, and how to sniff out danger. In lively prose interspersed with fun facts (did you know that an adult elephant eats 1,000 pounds of food a day?), Martin Jenkins spins a striking story about this no-nonsense matriarch and her remarkable brood, while Ivan Bates brings the great beasts to rumbling, tumbling, lumbering life.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Conservation biologist Jenkins (Chameleons Are Cool) takes readers on safari into the world of African elephants with this blending of factual text and playful, at times soulful illustrations. Bates's (One Dark Night) watercolor washes feature elephants so expressive they sometimes seem to be smiling. His pencil strokes convey a sense of earth-shaking movement as the biggest land mammals make their way across the spreads, as well as a sense of intelligence behind the eyes. Enlarged, conversational text relays information about "the most important member of an elephant family"-the pachyderm grandmother ("Grandma's been around a long time and she knows lots of important things. She knows where the water holes are when it hasn't rained and the easiest places to cross the big river when it has rained"). Meanwhile, smaller bold typeface relates more straightforward elephant facts about life span, diet, etc. (e.g., "Adults eat about 1U tons of food each day"). This inviting nonfiction primer starring the matriarch of the elephant herd maintains a story-like appeal for young audiences as it delivers intriguing information. Ages 5-up. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Here is a book that combines the best of preschool picture book with the best of easy science. The author chooses a subject about an animal family that preschoolers can relate to from their own family experiences. Elephants are almost as popular as bears with this age group. The illustrations are big, friendly, and engaging and totally accurate. Information is imparted in an informal text about life in the herd. Additional details appear in only slightly smaller type. These can be skipped for the youngest listeners or included. They do not impede the flow of the main text. The book even includes a good simple index, a nice teaching tool at this level. On top of this, grandmothers come out looking good. 2003, Candlewick Press, Ages 4 to 7.
— Beth Guldseth
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-This picture book tells the story of a grandmother elephant and the role she plays in her herd. The narrative is printed in large text, and facts about these animals, presented in a smaller font, appear throughout. Unfortunately, Grandma's tale and these flimsy tidbits collide, as the two text elements cavort about the spreads, often confusing readers. In a valiant attempt not to misinform his audience, Jenkins frequently uses words and phrases such as "usually," "don't normally," and "or so" to qualify statements. Salt licks are defined as "places where the earth is full of minerals. Lots of animals eat the salty earth there, which helps to keep them healthy." To explain the elephant's diminishing habitat, the author states that "people have taken their land for farming." A section at the end provides a few more cautious details. The index suggests that children should "Look up the pages to find out about all these elephant things." The watercolor and colored-pencil illustrations are more successful as a variety of individual animals are presented with obvious craft and affection. All in all, the story isn't really a story and the related facts are too few and too vague to satisfy readers' curiosity.-Jody McCoy, The Bush School, Seattle, WA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Human grandmas and preschoolers will relish this picture-book look at grandma elephant, "the most important member of an elephant family." The author, a conservation biologist, explains that Grandma knows how to find the water holes and the best melons; she knows the easy places to cross a river; she tells the other elephants what to do with "a rumble, rumble, rumble, deep down in her throat." The large-type text is suitable for reading aloud, while smaller text on each page provides additional facts for the slightly older reader or researcher. The illustrator, using watercolor and pencil, creates great galumphing elephants with lots of personality in soft blues, grays, and golds. He cleverly conveys the elephant hugeness, with elephants too big to fit on a double page. The double-page centerfold of Grandma is suitable for display. He dedicates the title to his child's grandmas. While not all grandmas will appreciate comparisons to the ponderous pachyderms, ones with a sense of humor will enjoy sharing this title with their grandchildren. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763673819
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Publication date:
09/23/2014
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
855,673
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
810L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Martin Jenkins, a conservation biologist, is the author of several nonfiction books for children. He says, "I first saw wild elephants in the Masai Mara Reserve in Kenya, where a big family of them was making their way across the savanna. I’ve seen elephants lots of times since then, but I’ll never forget that first family, strolling across the plains without a care in the world - that was magic."

Ivan Bates has illustrated many books for children. He says of GRANDMA ELEPHANT'S IN CHARGE, "I have always found elephants to be fascinating creatures, capable of both extreme strength and tenderness. This, along with their mighty stature and a wonderful setting amid vast land- and skyscapes, makes them a joy to draw."

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews