ISBN-10:
0201516500
ISBN-13:
9780201516500
Pub. Date:
12/31/1994
Publisher:
Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Graphics Techology / Edition 3

Graphics Techology / Edition 3

by James H. Earle

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780201516500
Publisher: Prentice Hall Professional Technical Reference
Publication date: 12/31/1994
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 676
Product dimensions: 8.36(w) x 9.34(h) x 1.42(d)

About the Author

James H. Earle is a recognized authority in the field of engineering graphics. Dr. Earle received his bachelor of architecture and his Ph.D. in education from Texas A&M, and he taught in the engineering design graphics department from 1957 until his retirement in 1995. He has been active in the American Society for Engineering Education and has held positions from secretary through chair in the Engineering Design Graphics division. From 1986-1991, he served as chair of the Annual Conference Committee. His books have introduced the concepts and techniques of engineering graphics to over half a million students.

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Graphics Technology covers the principles of engineering graphics and graphical problem solving for courses in two-and four-year programs. Its content is based on the needs of industry and is presented in a classroom-tested format that is as functional and understandable as possible.

Content

The major areas of engineering graphics that this text presents are:

  • working drawings
  • descriptive geometry
  • computer graphics
  • introductory design
  • specialty areas
  • communications in general

Knowledge of all of these areas is important to the career of the engineer, technologist, and technician.

The principles of working drawing preparation area based on the ANSI standards, and include dimensioning, tolerances, welding, and material specifications. Descriptive geometry principles are covered to aid three-dimensional problem solving and spatial analysis.

Chapter 30 gives an overview of two-and three-dimensional computer graphics. Introductory design is covered in Chapter 2, along with design problems that can be assigned as projects. Specialty areas of pipe drawing, electronic drawing, technical illustration, data analysis, and nomography are included to broaden the students' understanding of graphics technology.

Format Features

Graphics Technology has been designed to be as teachable as possible by including a number of features that make teaching easy for the teacher and learning easy for the student. These features are especially useful when students areworking and studying on their own without the help of their teacher.

Features that help this learning transfer include:

  • A second color which highlights steps in the solution
  • Clear, teachable examples that assist with visualization
  • Problems and examples that are presented using step-by-step illustrations
  • Key points noted on the illustrations
  • Human figures that show viewpoints
  • Industrial examples which make problems meaningful

A Career Reference Book

Some materials in this book may not be covered in the course for which it is used due to time limitations or the emphasis of the course by the instructor. Because the course may be the only graphics course that a student will encounter, this book should be retained for reference.

An engineering drawing is not just a document that is essential for a project to become a reality; it is a legal contract. As such its preparation must adhere to strict standards and be as clearly prepared as possible. Students can use this book as a reference throughout their professional careers.

A Learning System

This book can be used in combination with the supplements listed inside the back cover to create a complete teaching system.

Textbook Problems

Over 500 problems are available to aid the student in mastering important concepts.

Problem Manuals

Nineteen problem books and guides (with outlines, problem solutions, tests, and test solutions) are available for use with this book, and new problem books will be introduced in the future. Fifteen of the manuals include computer graphics versions of the exercises on the backs of the problem sheets, allowing the student to find the solution to each problem by both computer and pencil.

Acknowledgments

We are grateful for the assistance of many who have influenced the development of this volume. Numerous industries have furnished photographs, drawings, and applications that have been acknowledged in the corresponding legends. The Engineering Design Graphics staff of Texas A&M University have been helpful in making suggestions for this book. Professor Tom Pollock provided valuable information on various metals in Chapter 12.

We are indebted to Neal Alen, Rodger Payne, and Jimm Meloy of AutoDesk, Inc. for their assistance with AutoCad®. We appreciate the assistance of Karen Kershaw of MegaCADD, Inc. David Ratner of Biomechanics Corporation was helpful in providing HUMANCAD® software.

We are appreciative of the many institutions that have though enough of our publications to adopt them for classroom use. It is an honor for one's work to be accepted by colleagues. We are hopeful that this textbook will fill the needs of engineering and technology programs. As always, comments and suggestions for improvement and revision of this book will be appreciated.

College Station, Texas
Jim Earle

Table of Contents

Introduction to Engineering and Technology.
The Design Process.
Drawing Instruments.
Lettering.
Geometric Construction.
Orthographic Sketching.
Orthographic Drawing With Instruments.
Auxiliary Views.
Sections.
Screws, Fasteners, and Springs.
Gears and Cams.
Materials and Processes.
Dimensioning.
Tolerances.
Welding.
Working Drawings.
Reproduction of Drawings.
Three-Dimensional Pictorials.
Points, Lines, and Planes.
Primary Auxiliary Views in Descriptive Geometry.
Successive Auxiliary Views.
Revolution.
Vector Graphics.
Intersections and Developments.
Graphs.
Nomography.
Empirical Equations and Calculus.
Pipe Drafting.
Electric/Electronics Graphics.

Preface

PREFACE:

Graphics Technology covers the principles of engineering graphics and graphical problem solving for courses in two-and four-year programs. Its content is based on the needs of industry and is presented in a classroom-tested format that is as functional and understandable as possible.

Content

The major areas of engineering graphics that this text presents are:

  • working drawings
  • descriptive geometry
  • computer graphics
  • introductory design
  • specialty areas
  • communications in general

Knowledge of all of these areas is important to the career of the engineer, technologist, and technician.

The principles of working drawing preparation area based on the ANSI standards, and include dimensioning, tolerances, welding, and material specifications. Descriptive geometry principles are covered to aid three-dimensional problem solving and spatial analysis.

Chapter 30 gives an overview of two-and three-dimensional computer graphics. Introductory design is covered in Chapter 2, along with design problems that can be assigned as projects. Specialty areas of pipe drawing, electronic drawing, technical illustration, data analysis, and nomography are included to broaden the students' understanding of graphics technology.

Format Features

Graphics Technology has been designed to be as teachable as possible by including a number of features that make teaching easy for the teacher and learning easy for the student. These features are especially useful when studentsareworking and studying on their own without the help of their teacher.

Features that help this learning transfer include:

  • A second color which highlights steps in the solution
  • Clear, teachable examples that assist with visualization
  • Problems and examples that are presented using step-by-step illustrations
  • Key points noted on the illustrations
  • Human figures that show viewpoints
  • Industrial examples which make problems meaningful

A Career Reference Book

Some materials in this book may not be covered in the course for which it is used due to time limitations or the emphasis of the course by the instructor. Because the course may be the only graphics course that a student will encounter, this book should be retained for reference.

An engineering drawing is not just a document that is essential for a project to become a reality; it is a legal contract. As such its preparation must adhere to strict standards and be as clearly prepared as possible. Students can use this book as a reference throughout their professional careers.

A Learning System

This book can be used in combination with the supplements listed inside the back cover to create a complete teaching system.

Textbook Problems

Over 500 problems are available to aid the student in mastering important concepts.

Problem Manuals

Nineteen problem books and guides (with outlines, problem solutions, tests, and test solutions) are available for use with this book, and new problem books will be introduced in the future. Fifteen of the manuals include computer graphics versions of the exercises on the backs of the problem sheets, allowing the student to find the solution to each problem by both computer and pencil.

Acknowledgments

We are grateful for the assistance of many who have influenced the development of this volume. Numerous industries have furnished photographs, drawings, and applications that have been acknowledged in the corresponding legends. The Engineering Design Graphics staff of Texas A&M University have been helpful in making suggestions for this book. Professor Tom Pollock provided valuable information on various metals in Chapter 12.

We are indebted to Neal Alen, Rodger Payne, and Jimm Meloy of AutoDesk, Inc. for their assistance with AutoCad®. We appreciate the assistance of Karen Kershaw of MegaCADD, Inc. David Ratner of Biomechanics Corporation was helpful in providing HUMANCAD® software.

We are appreciative of the many institutions that have though enough of our publications to adopt them for classroom use. It is an honor for one's work to be accepted by colleagues. We are hopeful that this textbook will fill the needs of engineering and technology programs. As always, comments and suggestions for improvement and revision of this book will be appreciated.

College Station, Texas
Jim Earle

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