×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Grateful Dead Reader
     

The Grateful Dead Reader

5.0 2
by David Dodd
 

See All Formats & Editions

Arranged in chronological order, these pieces add up to nothing less than a full-scale history of the greatest tour band in the history of rock. From Tom Wolfe's account of the Dead's first performance as the Grateful Dead (at an Acid Test in 1965), to Ralph Gleason's 1967 interview with the 24-year-old Jerry Garcia, to Mary Eisenhart's obituary of the beloved leader

Overview

Arranged in chronological order, these pieces add up to nothing less than a full-scale history of the greatest tour band in the history of rock. From Tom Wolfe's account of the Dead's first performance as the Grateful Dead (at an Acid Test in 1965), to Ralph Gleason's 1967 interview with the 24-year-old Jerry Garcia, to Mary Eisenhart's obituary of the beloved leader of the band, these selections include not only outstanding writing on the band itself, but also superb pieces on music and pop culture generally. Fans will be fascinated by the poetry, fiction, drawings, and rare and revealing photographs featured in the book, as well as the anthology's many interviews and profiles, interpretations of lyrics, and concert and record reviews. Still, The Grateful Dead was more than a band--it was a cultural phenomenon. For three decades it remained on one unending tour, followed everywhere by a small army of nomadic fans. This phenomenon is both analyzed and celebrated here, in such pieces as Ed McClanahan's groundbreaking article in Playboy in 1972, fan-magazine editor Blair Jackson's 1990 essay on the seriousness of the drug situation at Dead concerts, and Steve Silberman's insightful essays on the music and its fans.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Diehard Deadheads Dodd and Spaulding, a husband-and-wife editorial team, have compiled 41 short selections from the more than 4000 entries in The Grateful Dead and the Deadheads (Greenwood, 1997), the definitive Grateful Dead bibliography, gathered by Dodd and fellow collaborator Rob Weiner. With the exception of an excerpt from Tom Wolfe s landmark Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968), the editors favor more obscure extracts from fiction, interviews, record liner notes, poems, articles, and concert reviews. They divide the material into four sections, chronicling the band s Haight heyday (1967 75), the growth of the Deadhead legion (1976 86), commercial success (1987 94), and Jerry Garcia s death. Except for two revealing interviews with Garcia and lyricist Robert Hunter, the editors have resurrected Dead ephemera that adds little to the mounting Dead literature that already includes standards such as Robert Greenfield s Dark Star: An Oral Biography of Jerry Garcia (LJ 6/1/96) and Dead manager Rock Scully s Living with the Dead (LJ 12/95). Recommended for Deadheads only. Dave Szatmary, Univ. of Washington Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
What a Long, Strange Trip It Was: a comprehensive, thoughtful anthology depicting the phenomena and foibles encompassing the 30-odd year "unending tour" of the Grateful Dead. Husband-and-wife editors Dodd (The Grateful Dead and Deadheads, not reviewed) and Spaulding shrewdly cast a wide net in addressing the Deadhead phenomenon, and the plurality of perspectives and information helps even neophytes understand the band's tenacity in outlasting the Haight-Ashbury days, their development as an underground phenomenon, and their dedication to musical experimentation (as reflected in everything from idiosyncratic side projects to their obsession with live sound and encouragement of tape trading among their hardcore fans). Though these pieces do not dispel a conception of this Deadhead subculture as solipsistic and clubbish, there's much fine writing here nonetheless. Key pieces include Tom Wolfe's account of an early "Kool-Aid Acid Test," essays on the Dead's beginnings by pioneering pop journalist Ralph Gleason, and accounts of the 1970-era period (when it became evident the band had evolved beyond being a mere California rock group into something more unpredictably fluid) by Steve Silberman, George W.S. Trow, and novelist Ed McClanahan. While contributors like Silberman, Mary Eisenhart, and Blair Jackson are connected within the Dead organization (and, to their credit, find insiders' insights), the rock critical establishment is represented by short, lively pieces from Robert Christgau and Richard Meltzer, as well as writers not associated with the Dead's milieu (like screenwriter Charlie Haas and fiction writer Lee Abbott). Substantial interviews with keyDeadmembers Jerry Garcia, Phil Lesh, and lyricist Robert Hunter also appear. While many pieces hew to depictions of the Dead-related lifestyle as an elaborate traveling utopia, fan-magazine editor Jackson portrays darker qualities in his 1990 depiction of a scene consumed by both overindulgence and undercover drug warriors looking for easy prosecutions. Although the book ends abruptly with saddened consideration of Garcia's 1995 demise (without discussing the Dead's influence upon current cultish, touring "jam bands"), it remains a satisfying and thought-provoking compendium of countercultural commentary.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780199728633
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication date:
08/24/2000
Series:
Readers on American Musicians
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,034,836
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

David G. Dodd and Diana Spaulding are a husband-and-wife editorial team. David is a branch manager with the Marin County Free Library in San Rafael, California. He co-edited (with Robert Weiner) the definitive Grateful Dead bibliography, The Grateful Dead and Deadheads. He also maintains the Annotated Grateful Dead Lyrics site on the Internet. Diana is a reference librarian for Fireman's Fund Insurance. They live in Petaluma, California.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Grateful Dead Reader 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Hoosker More than 1 year ago
I am extremely disappointed that every sentence has a typo. What is wrong here? Is it the e-format? Not sure who to complain to but it's very hard to read this and other e-books because of all the squares, dots, grammar and spelling errors. I love this book though!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book gives an excellent insight to how it really was to be a deadhead. It chonicalized major events, ending with the mournful death of Jerry Garcia. It gives a real sense of the free love generation.