Great Apes

Great Apes

by Will Self
4.5 6

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Great Apes 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
What demarcates Self's style in this text is his reluctance to make a mere dialectial inversion of human and ape. Instead, Self retains the inherent features of both species and merely transposes the power relation. The apes, so to sign, retain their attributes through ritual grooming, polygamy, and guttural sounds, fusing with the human world we now recognize. The humans, too, retain their elements of non-touch, monagamy, and other such attributes although they exist in the place of apes in our own world: as spectacles in zoos or laboratory subjects. What Self so brilliantly effects in his prose is a conceptual extension of those effects of that which makes us elementally human or apish, reversing the power regime. Whether or not Self woudl maintain that this text also ostenisbly operates as a critique of the arts and pyschoanalysis as innately apish, we leave aside. The recurring figure of Zack Busner lives again in more hirsute flesh...
Guest More than 1 year ago
Will Self forces us humans to take a glimpse into the lives of chimpanzees to recognize the faults in our own 'humane society.' During the course of this book the reader will find him/herself disgusted with the world that Self has created, but upon stepping back will realize that Self's world resembles ours in a number of ways. This book is a must read for anyone whose view of the human population and practices are a bit jaded, and anyone who looks at anything skeptically
Guest More than 1 year ago
a wonderful account of our culture's beliefs and perceptions with a planet of the 'nonhuman primates' type twist. it all results in getting lost in self's fantasy world but later realizing that it's really not that different there than it is out here in real life right now. would be a bit frightening to the masses i believe...
Guest More than 1 year ago
Simon Dykes is a perfectly normal London artist who wakes up one morning with the sudden delusion (perhaps brought on by a drug binge the night before) that he is human, and that everyone else in the world used to be human. He is in bed with a mate of his, and he finds her chimpanzee form so panic-inspiring that he needs to be subdued and committed to a mental hospital. He finds ordinary chimpanzee social interaction deeply disturbing, and persists in the delusion that he is human, but under the care of the famous therapist Zack Busner (at least partly modelled after Oliver Sacks), he becomes well enough to leave the institution. He comes home to live with Busner and his pack, and over the course of the book slowly and imperfectly manages to reconnect with his chimpanzee nature and with the chimps around him. An excellent (if not tremendously easy) read.