Great Classic Stories III: Unabridged Classic Short Stories

Great Classic Stories III: Unabridged Classic Short Stories

by Authors Various

Audiobook(CD - Unabridged)

$19.99 $29.95 Save 33% Current price is $19.99, Original price is $29.95. You Save 33%.
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Thursday, August 24 , Order now and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Overview

Great Classic Stories III: Unabridged Classic Short Stories by Authors Various

A great new collection of classic short fiction, brilliantly read by a selection of narratorsThis recording includes the following stories:- "The Lightening-Rod Man" by Herman Melville- "One of the Missing" by Ambrose Bierce- "The Leopard Man's Story" by Jack London- "Tennessee's Partner" by Bret Harte- "The New Catacomb" by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle- "A Pair of Silk Stockings" by Kate Chopin- "My Watch" and "The Widow's Protest" by Mark Twain- "An Ideal Family" by Kate Mansfield- "A Painful Case" by James Joyce- "Small Fry" by Anton Chekhov- "The Road from Colonus" by E. M. Forster- "Silhouettes" by Jerome K Jerome- "The Voice of the City" by O. Henry- "Dalyrimple Goes Wrong" by F. Scott Fitzgerald- "The Diamond Mine" by Willa Cather- "The Man with the Golden Brain" by Alphonse Daudet- "Morella" by Edgar Allan Poe- "The Necklace" by Guy de Maupassant- "The Portrait" by Edith Wharton- "The Philosopher in the Apple Orchard" by Anthony Hope- "Monkey Nuts" by D. H. Lawrence

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781609983130
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date: 09/20/2011
Edition description: Unabridged
Sales rank: 796,732
Product dimensions: 5.10(w) x 5.90(h) x 1.20(d)

About the Author

Bronson Pinchot, an Audie Award-winning narrator and Audible's Narrator of the Year for 2010, received his education at Yale University. He restores Greek Revival buildings and appears in television, film, and on stage whenever the pilasters and entablatures overwhelm him.

Jennifer Bradshaw has lent her voice to a number of audio books, including Secret Life of a Vampire: Love at Stake,
Willow Springs, and The Crime Is Murder.

John Lee, a stage actor and writer and a coproducer of feature films, has narrated more than one hundred audiobooks of every conceivable genre, earning some three dozen Earphones Awards and the prestigious Audie Award.

Gerard Doyle was born of Irish parents and raised in Hertfordshire, England. In Great Britain he has enjoyed an extensive career in both television and repertory theater and toured nationally and internationally with the English Shakespeare Company. He has appeared in London's West End in the gritty musical The Hired Man. In America he has appeared on Broadway in The Weir and on television in New York Undercover and Law & Order. A seasoned narrator of audiobooks, he has been awarded eleven AudioFile Earphones Awards and in 2006 won the prestigious Audie Award for his reading of Blackstone's recording of The Dead Yard by Adrian McKinty. He lives with his wife and two children in Sag Harbor, New York.

Herman Melville (1819–1891) was born in New York. Family hardships forced him to leave school for various occupations, including shipping as a cabin boy to Liverpool in 1839—a voyage that sparked his love for the sea. A shrewd social critic and philosopher in his fiction, he is considered an outstanding writer of the sea and a great stylist who mastered both realistic narrative and a rich, rhythmical prose.

Ambrose Bierce (1842-ca. 1914) was an American journalist, short-story writer, and poet. Born in Ohio, he served in the Civil War and then settled in San Francisco. He wrote for Hearst's Examiner, his wit and satire making him the literary dictator of the Pacific coast and strongly influencing many writers. He disappeared into war-torn Mexico in 1913.

Jack London (1876-1916) was an American author, journalist, and social activist. Before making a living at his writing, he spent time as an oyster pirate, a sailor, a cannery worker, a gold miner, and a journalist. He was a pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction and was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction writing. He is best known for his novels The Call of the Wild and White Fang, both set during the Klondike gold rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire," "An Odyssey of the
North," and "Love of Life." He also wrote of the South Pacific in such stories as "The Pearls of Parlay" and "The
Heathen." He was a passionate advocate of unionization, socialism, and the rights of workers and wrote several powerful works dealing with these topics,
including The Iron Heel, The People of the Abyss, and The War of the Classes.

Kate Chopin (1851-1901) was born Katherine O'Flaherty in St. Louis in 1851. She was a popular social belle, admired for her wit and beauty. In 1871 she married Oscar Chopin and lived in Louisiana until his sudden death in 1882. Chopin began writing about the Creole and Cajun people in the South, gaining acclaim for her finely crafted short stories. Upon publication in 1899, her now-classic novel The Awakening was widely condemned for its controversial themes, and Chopin was devastated by its harsh critical reception. She died in 1904, denied in her lifetime the recognition she desperately wanted and richly deserved.

Bret Harte (1836-1902) was born in Albany, New York, and was raised in New York City. He had no formal education, but he inherited a love for books. Harte wrote for the San Franciscan Golden Era paper. There he published his first condensed novels, which were brilliant parodies of the works of well-known authors, such as Dickens and Cooper. Later, he became clerk in the US branch mint. This job gave Harte time to also work for the Overland Monthly, where he published his world-famous "Luck of the Roaring Camp" and commissioned Mark Twain to write weekly articles. In 1871, Harte was hired by the Atlantic Monthly for $10,000 to write twelve stories a year, which was the highest figure paid to an American writer at the time.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930) was born of Irish parentage in Scotland. He studied medicine at the University of Edinburgh, but he also had a passion for storytelling. His first book introduced that prototype of the modern detective in fiction, Sherlock Holmes. Despite the immense popularity Holmes gained throughout the world, Doyle was not overly fond of the character and preferred to write other stories. Eventually popular demand won out and he continued to satisfy readers with the adventures of the legendary sleuth. He also wrote historical romances and made two essays into pseudoscientific fantasy: The Lost World and The Poison Belt.

Mark Twain (1835–1910) was born Samuel L. Clemens in the town of Florida, Missouri. One of the most popular and influential authors our nation has ever produced, his keen wit and incisive satire earned him praise from both critics and peers. He has been called not only the greatest humorist of his age but also the father of American literature.

Anton Chekhov (1860–1904) was the author of hundreds of short stories and several plays and is regarded by many as both the greatest Russian storyteller and the father of modern drama.

Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923) was born in Wellington, New Zealand, and settled in Europe to finish her education. She published her first short fiction in The New Age, then in Rhythm, whose editor, the British writer and critic John Middleton Murry, she soon married. Her writing contributed to the development of the stream of consciousness technique and to the modernist use of multiple viewpoints, and her style has had a powerful influence on subsequent writers in the same genre.

James Joyce (1882–1941) was an Irish expatriate writer, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the twentieth century. He is best known for his landmark novel Ulysses and its highly controversial successor Finnegans Wake, as well as the short-story collection Dubliners and the semi-autobiographical novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.

Edward Morgan Forster (1879–1970) was born in London and raised by his mother and paternal aunts. He pursued his interests in philosophy and classics at Cambridge and there began his writing. He wrote six novels, short stories, essays, and other nonfiction. He is known for his liberal humanism, notably exemplified in his greatest novel, A Passage to India.

Alphonse Daudet (1840-1897) was a French novelist and the father of writers Leon Daudet and Lucien Daudet. He is regarded as one of the most iconic names in French literature.

Guy de Maupassant (1850-1893) was a popular nineteenth-century French writer, considered one of the fathers of the modern short story and one of the form's finest exponents. A protege of Flaubert, his stories are characterized by their economy of style and efficient, effortless denouement. Many of the stories are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s, and several describe the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught in the conflict, emerge changed. He authored some three hundred short stories, six novels, three travel books, and one volume of verse.

Anthony Hope (1863-1933), a thirty-year-old barrister, wrote The Prisoner of Zenda in 1893. His mythical Ruritania, with its witty hero and shrewd villains, became so popular that he gave up his law practice after the book's publication.

F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940) was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, and educated at Princeton, where he was a leader in theatrical and literary activities. He began writing his first novel, This Side of Paradise, while serving in the army. Its publication in 1920 established him as the spokesman for the Jazz Age. His major novels include The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night.

Willa Cather (1873-1947), the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of more than fifteen books, is widely considered one of the most distinguished American writers of the early twentieth century. She grew up in Nebraska and is best known for her depictions of frontier life on the Great Plains in novels such as O Pioneers!, My Antonia, and Song of the Lark. In 1944 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1848) transformed the American literary landscape with his innovations in the short story genre and his haunting lyrical poetry, and he is credited with inventing American gothic horror and detective fiction.

David Herbert Lawrence (1885-1930), novelist, short-story writer, poet, critic, playwright, and essayist, was one of the most important and controversial figures of twentieth-century English literature. His works confront the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization and are notable for their passionate intensity and for a sensuality that centers on the erotic. Though his opinions earned him enemies, persecution, and censorship during his lifetime, he is now recognized as an artistic visionary.

Jerome K. Jerome (1859–1927), English humorist, novelist, and playwright, was born in Staffordshire and brought up in London. After a series of jobs including clerk, schoolmaster, actor, and journalist, he became joint editor of the Idler in 1892 and launched his own twopenny weekly, To-Day. His magnificently ridiculous Three Men in a Boat (1889) established itself as a humorous classic of the whimsical. His other books include Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow (1886); Three Men on the Bummel (1900); Paul Kelver (1902); the morality play The Passing of the Third Floor Back (1907); and his autobiography, My Life and Times (1926).

Edith Wharton (1862-1937) was born in New York and is best known for her stories of life among the upper-class society into which she was born. She was educated privately at home and in Europe. In 1894 she began writing fiction, and her novel The House of Mirth established her as a leading writer. Her novels The Age of Innocence and Old New York were each awarded the Pulitzer Prize. She was the first woman to receive that honor. In 1929 she was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Fiction.

O. Henry (1862-1910), born William Sydney Porter in Greensboro, North Carolina, was a short-story writer whose tales romanticized the commonplace, in particular, the lives of ordinary people in New York City. His stories often had surprise endings, a device that became identified with his name. He began writing sketches around 1887, and his stories of adventure in the Southwest United States and in Central America were immediately popular with magazine readers.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews