The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788-1800

The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788-1800

by Jay Winik
4.4 9

NOOK Book(eBook)

$8.99
View All Available Formats & Editions
Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
Want a NOOK ? Explore Now

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788-1800 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Winik's new book has dared to be written on the premise that the world in the 18th century was indeed connected much more than we imagine. American was not a completely isolated new world wholly apart from the happenings of Europe. Winik argues that events in France during the revolution had a noticeable impact on the politics of the American Republic. Viewing such events as the Whiskey Rebellion juxtaposed with events like the storming of the Bastille or the violence that erupted in the French countryside know as the Great Fear give a new perspective in which to view familiar American historical events. The events in Russia are maybe a little less directly applicable to the US experience but nonetheless it gives the book a sense of completeness. A major player in international politics of the time that is missing its own chapters is Great Britain. But I suppose due to space and time constraints, Winik choose to include the lesser known Russian region. Overall a very entertaining and interesting read that gives justification for looking at history from a global perspective regardless of the time period.
Roweking More than 1 year ago
Great book - put the American experience into the worldwide story of the day.
glauver More than 1 year ago
Historian Jay Winik has pulled together the 1788-1800 histories of the United States, France, and Russia and asked the question, “Why did each nation follow the path it took?” Some of the narrative is familiar, some not. Winik really shines in his portraits of the characters. Catherine the Great, the Founding Fathers, Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI, John Paul Jones, the architects of the French Revolution and the Terror; the list goes on and on. Winik is too shrewd to present a simple analysis of the decade. He believes that the main reason for the survival if democracy in America was the leadership of George Washington. Catherine turned away from liberalism and became a reactionary; France wearied of the carnage and uncertainty of the Revolution and embraced Napoleon. As a result, the 1800s did not fulfill the dreams of the preceding century. Those interested in history's turning points should not miss this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago