The Great War and Modern Memory

The Great War and Modern Memory

by Paul Fussell
3.6 8

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The Great War and Modern Memory 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Literary critic Paul Fussell located our century's literary and martial birth in the appalling British trenches of World War I in his insightful and thoroughly documented book, 'The Great War and Modern Memory.' He covers in detail the memoirs of Siegfried Sassoon, Edmund Blunden, Robert Graves (of I, Claudius fame) and the poetry of Wilfred Owen, along with many others. We return to 1914, when there was no radio, no TV, no movies to speak of, and when the populace had implicit faith in their press, their King and 'progress.' The central irony of this book was that the population rushed to support the war in order to support these 19th century ideals, ideals which would be shattered in the war that gave birth to the twentieth century. Fussell documents how World War I gave us the standardized form, the wristwatch, daylight savings time, civilian censorship and bureaucratic euphemism--and for the first time, despair that technology was driving civilization into perpetual war. 'The Great War and Modern Memory' is probably one of the most significant academic works of the late 20th Century. Whether you agree with Fussell or not, you're bound to learn a lot--fortunately, his writing style is eminently comfortable.
Paul Iannetti More than 1 year ago
Any one interested in the history of the First World War should read this book. It stands alone. I am just complaining of the numerous typographical errors in this edition. Barnes and Noble charges good money for a clearly digitized version of a very scholarly work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a discussion of literature during the First World War. It lacks the research of a true historical text. It is more a book about poetry than a book of great historical importance. Fussell fails to explain many of his literary references. Unless you are someone with a vast content knowledge of World War One British literature you will be lost in places of this book.
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