Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy

Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy

by John A. Quelch, Katherine E. Jocz
5.0 2

Hardcover

$31.50 $35.00 Save 10% Current price is $31.5, Original price is $35. You Save 10%.
View All Available Formats & Editions
Eligible for FREE SHIPPING
  • Get it by Thursday, January 25 ,  Order by 12:00 PM Eastern and choose Expedited Delivery during checkout.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
sergevansteenkiste More than 1 year ago
John Quelch and Katherine Jocz plead in ¿Greater Good¿ for a closer collaboration between marketing and democracy. Quelch and Jocz systematically point out the respective strengths and weaknesses of marketing and democracy. They do it through the study of the six characteristics that marketing and democracy share with each other in part one. These six characteristics are: 1) exchange of value, i.e., goods and services, 2) consumption of goods and services, 3) choice that allows the satisfaction of physical and psychological needs, 4) free flow of information, 5) engagement and involvement of as many people as possible, and 6) inclusion of the same people in the marketing and democratic processes. Quelch and Jocz review several interrelationships in part two: 1) marketing and politics, 2) marketing and the media, 3) marketing and programs, and 4) marketing and nations. Marketing and programs is by far the weakest of the four interrelationships under study in part two. The examination of the interrelationships of both politics and the media with marketing probably represents the most interesting section of ¿Greater Good.¿ To summarize, Quelch and Jocz make an original contribution to leveraging both marketing and democracy toward a greater good.