ISBN-10:
1462047084
ISBN-13:
9781462047086
Pub. Date:
Publisher:
Greatness-Cored Leadership: Keys to Becoming a Great Human Resources Leader

Greatness-Cored Leadership: Keys to Becoming a Great Human Resources Leader

by Tri Junarso

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Overview

If you work in a human resources department, you have a great opportunity to display leadership by thinking like a businessperson, shaping the company culture, and hiring the right people. With this guidebook, you'll learn strategies to improve your performance as a human resources professional so you can exude great leadership. Discover how to



• promote entrepreneurship;

• promote teamwork through a corporate manifesto;

• stretch your organization's capabilities to achieve growth;

• build more engaged cultures by energizing employees.



Today's human resources professional is a key player in driving growth and innovation. It's no longer enough to just be effective; you must also be a leader and take steps to help your company achieve its goals.



Step out of the back office and take on key roles as a business partner, strategic thinker, and profit builder. With Greatness-Cored Leadership, you'll understand the key challenges that companies face and learn how to translate visions into reality.


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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781462047086
Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
Publication date: 09/02/2011
Pages: 392
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.81(d)

Read an Excerpt

GREATNESS-CORED LEADERSHIP

KEYS TO BECOMING A GREAT HUMAN RESOURCES LEADER
By Tri Junarso

iUniverse, Inc.

Copyright © 2011 Tri Junarso
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4620-4708-6


Chapter One

1st

Corporate Manifesto

Corporate manifesto is designed to bring everyone in the organization together. Corporate manifesto states the core intention of the company, the guiding principles of it, and the policies that guide organizations to effectively realize the stated intention. It describes:

a. Who should benefit most from all the effort that is put into the corporate: Strengthen company's mission through personal commitment.

b. Company's purpose into employees' feelings. It's mode of encouraging why an employee should do more than the minimum required.

The manifesto must be something not only worth reading, but worth acting on.

c. Who owns the corporate, how corporate behaves, importance of the corporate: Embed guiding principles in the day-to-day language of business.

Corporate manifesto is a declaration of what the company is really all about. It captures what employees stand for and strive to deliver. Corporate manifesto has characteristics as follows:

a. Articulate credible, realistic attractive future for the company: To succeed in a business environment characterized by ongoing change, employees must never forget 'cause of company existence'—who we are. It is important to always keep in mind beliefs and values make the company unique.

Acting in accordance with company's beliefs and values will keep employees on the right course, and will continually increase the strength of the company.

Company's beliefs and values drive behaviors and enable achievement of company's mission.

b. Stretch the company beyond its current capabilities. Companies' resources and capabilities is seen more critical to the strategic action than the external environment.

Corporate strategy, in general, that is resource-based perspective, is based on the view of the company as a collection of capabilities.

The resource-based perspective highlights the need for a fit between the external market context in which a company operates and its internal capabilities.

"When I struck it, it just had to go in," says Andres Iniesta, who scored the latest-ever winning World Cup (2010) goal for Spain, sealing his team's 1-0 victory over the Netherlands.

c. Be clear, focus on action and interface with the strategy of the company: Make sure the alignment of Human Resource Management with strategic company goals.

Global revolution is changing business, and business is changing the world. Technology and innovation makes old borders obsolete. No part of business is immune.

The structure of the company is changing; relationships between companies are changing; the nature of work is changing; the definition of success is changing.

We are in the business of change. Companies are looking for a new way to do something, a way to change the process, to reduce costs, improve revenue, etc. Change is something we want everyone in our company doing.

Company manifesto should be flexible, it would change whenever required to adopt the new environment.

Culture

Culture, vision, mission, value and goal will sharpen the trust, which needs to describe why the corporate exists. Culture describes 'how we do things around here'— it is created from the messages that are received about how people are expected to behave.

Cultures develop in any organization, which its people spend time together and who are bound together through shared goals, beliefs, routines, needs or values.

Corporate culture is like our personality. Since personality is made up of the values, beliefs, underlying assumptions, interests, experiences, upbringing, and habits that create our behavior.

Corporate culture is the 'glue' that holds organizations together by providing cohesiveness and coherence among the parts.

Corporate culture defines the behavior, habit, and rule which stakeholder uses to interact with each other or moral, social, and behavioral norms of a corporation based on the beliefs, attitudes, and priorities of stakeholders.

Culture is something that we cannot actually see, except through its physical manifestations in our workplace.

There are lots of companies out there that can attest to their success in building the right culture for their organization.

KFC is one of three highest-ranked large organizations in Britain's Top Employers 2010 in best HR practice.

KFC is the quick service restaurant operation famous for its 'finger lickin' good' chicken dishes. Its staff surveys generate high response rates (the last one was 93%) and consistently show that people find KFC's culture to be friendly, fun and challenging, yet supportive.

"The thing that I would single out KFC for more than anything else is a recognition culture," says Managing Director Martin Shuker. "This stems all the way down from our Chairman to team members working on the floor. It's something we do all the time."

A HR leader must be particularly strong in shaping and enhancing the company's values. Values are the cornerstone of a company's culture.

The shared values of the organization provide a common sense of direction for all of employees and basic guidelines for their day-to-day behavior.

The culture was created over time by the leaders, employees and the management they use.

The leader must assure that there is consistency between the company's stated values and all other aspects of their vision including the strategies, the people plans and the company's operational plans.

Organizations work well because of both the talents of the people and the actions that people take. There is a clear alignment between the core elements of the organization's strategy and the behaviors of people within the organization.

Cultures of successful organizations attract and retain people with desired talents, and encourage and reward desired performance.

Culture is, in fact, the result of what has been rewarded, what has been punished and how these consequences occurred. HR leaders understand this process, and know how to implement practices that create the desire culture, which include:

a. Value, a belief, a mission, or a philosophy that is really meaningful to the company.

Bank of America has increased lending to small and mid-sized businesses in 2010.

Since the economy collapsed into a deep recession in late 2007, one area that has resisted recovery has been credit for small and mid-sized businesses.

Consequently, any increase in lending to those sectors, which provide nearly three-quarters of all U.S. jobs, is seen as good news.

"Small and mid-sized businesses are the engine of job growth, so the extent to which creditworthy businesses are able to get credit is integral to economic recovery," said Greg McBride, of Bankrate.com.

The greatest potentials for the growth of company are generated by a commitment to corporate values.

b. Behavior, the manner in which HR leaders and employees behave; how people, individuals, and groups act in organizations.

When Human Resources came around, employees weren't a cost they were an asset. They were an investment. They were a resource.

"People were looking to the leaders to act in a matter that demonstrated competence and professionalism," said Michael Alan Hamlin, author of "High Visibility."

When we treat people like resources, we dehumanize them. Employees are people, not merely resource. That doesn't mean that we can't demand great performance or that we should tolerate mediocrity.

When we think of employees as people, it changes the way we recruit, manage performance and focus on development. We may stop simply utilizing resources and start inspiring people to do amazing things.

Culture is the behavior that results when a group arrives at a set of—generally unspoken and unwritten—rules for working together which may need:

i. Place emphasis on employees in changing organizations and on efforts to enhance the quality of the employees, as well as organizational effectiveness.

People are the most critical resource a business has, and effective utilization of employee capability is the focus of the HR leader.

ii. Have emphasis on innovation and commitment: Develop organizational capability in innovation. Some of the best innovations come from applying new.

HR leaders foster a culture that promotes the values company wide. They encourage people for making productive mistakes. Innovation cannot happen without mistakes.

The mistakes may happen because someone dreams big and goes for it.

iii. Non-discriminatory: Maintain a work environment that is free from discrimination or harassment.

HR leaders ensure adherence to a balanced approach to employment equity, equal employment opportunity and exercise appropriate oversight to ensure employees are treated equally and with consistency regarding employment, compensation, benefits, promotion, work rules, transfer, discipline and termination.

Good looks can kill a woman's chances of snaring jobs considered 'masculine,' according to a study.

Attractive women faced discrimination when they applied for jobs where appearance was not seen as important.

These positions included job titles like manager of research and development, director of finance, mechanical engineer and construction supervisor.

They were also overlooked for categories like director of security, hardware salesperson, prison guard and tow-truck driver.

"In these professions being attractive was highly detrimental to women," researcher Stefanie Johnson said, adding that attractive women tended to be sorted into positions like receptionist or secretary.

iv. Committed to safety culture: Develop and maintain policies, practices and programs for demonstrating concern for employee safety, health and well—being.

Companies are to protect employees and will not tolerate labor violations.

v. Compete vigorously: Competition among companies grows to such an intense level that many firms were forced to re-examine their strategy, especially in terms of the tradeoffs among the competitive priorities, i.e. cost, quality, delivery/ service, and flexibility.

HR leaders encourage employees to compete on competencies.

They explore the potential of Human Resource Management to facilitate or inhibit the development and utilization of organizational competencies.

The HR leader focuses on the activities, functions, and processes that enhance or impede competency accumulation and exploitation, complements the behavioral perspective that potentially enhances the understanding of strategic Human Resource Management.

There is only one competence that can make us a winner in the organizations; and that is competitive competence.

The core competence is only useful as long as it is our competitive competence. Once the companies loose their competitiveness, they loose everything.

Therefore in today's business world where competitive landscape sizzles with innovation, the competitiveness must be robust enough to stand, and yet flexible enough to evolve as conditions demand.

Competitive-competence is at the heart of a company's ability to compete. It can be distinctive technological expertise, or skill set to provide better benefits to customers that rivals cannot match.

The creation and provision of customer value that other companies cannot compete is the essence of competitive-competence and is not limited to any particular industry.

The mantra today is to obsolete innovation and maintain our competitiveness.

Development of the key capabilities has strategic importance for organization, as it offers the benefits, i.e. lower operational costs, higher organizational effectiveness, higher market share, high customer retention, be faster and reduce cycle times, take new opportunities ahead of competitors. Competitiveness is characterized by:

1. Efforts to over-ride goal: Human Resource Management follows a set of guidelines with an objective of profitable business.

Goal setting is a powerful process for thinking about organization future, and for motivating employees to turn vision of the future into reality.

The setting of employee goals provides a useful means of measuring business success. It provides a direct means of feedback.

Goal-setting is what successful people do. People perform much better, both professionally and personally, when they have a clearly defined and time-framed goal to focus on.

By knowing precisely what we want to achieve, we know where we have to concentrate our efforts. We'll also quickly spot the distractions that would otherwise lure us from our course.

Properly-set goals can be incredibly motivating, and as we get into the habit of setting and achieving goals, we'll find that their self-confidence builds fast.

People get motivated to ride beyond the previous achievements. People will try to set aside them, and create new goals to aim overriding the old ones.

Understanding the person's personality preferences will add a new dimension to team interaction and with customers and prospects. Knowing what motivates individuals to action, how they prefer to communicate and how they make decisions brings teams to a new level.

2. Continuous and rapid improvement: Provide expertise, methodologies and tools that address the specific situation and this often leads us to additional areas where capabilities, improvements and change are needed.

3. Demonstration of competitive excellence: Excellence fosters quality, compliance to requirements and continuous improvement.

Organizations direct all resources to meet the highest standards for satisfied customers, superior products and services, engaged employees, safe working environments and financial results.

In today's interconnected, globally competitive world, organizations are realizing that strategic talent recruitment and human capital development are the new differentiators.

Bringing HR function to Top Management is gaining currency. The wisdom to embrace strategic HR demonstrates not just that people are the central resource for the organization, but that its calculated, mission-driven development is at the center of competitive excellence.

c. Habit, a mental attitude of HR leader, employees and organization. It may require to:

i. Evaluate the needs of the organization, and find out people to fill those needs: Build capabilities, commitment, programs and tools that fit the needs of the organization.

ii. Provide an optimum environment conducive to high levels of motivation and performance. Organizational climate mediates the relationship between Human Resource practices and employees satisfaction.

World-class organizations fill open positions 31 percent faster than typical companies, and see 66 percent fewer voluntary terminations.

The lower turnover rate has benefits on two levels. It shrinks the direct cost of administering the employee life cycle processes, including hiring, orientation training, enrollment programs and termination processes, and also reduces the time and resources necessary to recruit and train new hires.

iii. Adhere to code of ethics and business conduct guidelines: The HR leaders can play an important part in role modeling, in the cultural initiatives the organization may choose to take on.

To influence in a credible fashion, HR functions must first and foremost be a model for the future culture of the company.

The companies in the top 50 layoff crowd cut 531,000 jobs between November 2008 and April 2010.

"CEOs are clearly not hurting," researchers say. "But they are causing others to needlessly hurt—by cutting jobs to feather their own already comfortable executive nests. The damage done by these champions of the cutback is enormous."

iv. Regularly consult with CEO as they develop their strategic workforce plans: HR leader is committed to have regular consultation with CEO and Top Executives in relation to change initiatives and in the development and/or review of Human Resources policy.

Where HR leader is considering a restructure of the workforce, introduction of new technology or changes to existing work practices which affect employees and company, he/she must take the opinion of CEO.

A successful HR leader demonstrates habit of management consultation more than six times; than poor leaders.

d. Rules—Guide for conduct or action which employees and organization use to interact with each other; i.e.:

i. Work without doing evil, i.e. Employee who exhibits inappropriate or disruptive workplace behavior that can be deemed threatening or potentially threatening may be subject to disciplinary action.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from GREATNESS-CORED LEADERSHIP by Tri Junarso Copyright © 2011 by Tri Junarso. Excerpted by permission of iUniverse, Inc.. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

FOREWORD....................vii
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT....................xi
1st Corporate Manifesto....................1
Culture....................3
Vision....................16
Mission....................20
Goal....................22
Strategy....................24
2nd Human Resources....................29
Human Resource Management....................31
Human Capital Management....................35
3rd Value and Capacity....................44
Value....................44
Capacity....................82
Leader And Manager....................88
4th Greatness Cored Leadership....................106
5th Growth....................124
Success....................129
Visioning....................132
Development....................133
Empowerment....................147
Sleepover....................160
Training....................163
6th Responsibility....................169
Performance Management....................177
Accountability....................187
Profit....................198
7th Entrepreneurship....................221
Standard....................223
Quality....................225
Ethics....................229
Harassment....................236
Morality....................244
Value Creation....................251
Spirituality....................252
Happiness At Workplace....................253
Technology....................257
Innovativeness....................259
Teamwork....................263
Challenge....................265
8th Authenticity....................269
Integrity....................276
Maturity....................277
Humility....................279
Character....................288
Control....................289
Discipline....................293
Direction....................297
Commitment....................301
Action....................309
Presence....................315
9th Trust....................321
Credibility....................327
Competence....................332
Integrity....................336
Recognition....................339
Promotion....................345
Conditional Promotion....................348
Situational Promotion....................349
Categorical Promotion....................353
Courage....................358
Change....................359
Reference....................363

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